Werner Dietl's favorites

Open Source Bridge 2012

Favorite sessions for this user

* <Your Favorite Programming Language> Loses

Every programming language ever created has some horrible mistakes: your favorite is no exception. We'll talk about some fundamental principles of PL design and how they fail to play out in various real languages.
Chemistry
Bart Massey

* A Crash Course in Tech Management

'Programmer' and 'Manager' are two different titles for a reason: they're two different jobs and skill sets. If you have managerial aspirations (or have had them foisted upon you), come to this session to learn some of the tricks of the managerial trade.
Business
VM Brasseur

* Adventures in Hipster Programming: Solving a Math Puzzle Using a Genetic Algorithm Programmed in OCaml

I heard Will Shortz pose a mathematical puzzle on NPR on a Sunday Morning in January and I thought, "Hey, I can solve that with a genetic algorithm!" In OCaml. I'll show you how in this talk.
Cooking
Phil Tomson

* Building Developer Platforms

How do you transform your site or service into a platform others build on top of? How do you clear the path, lower the barriers, and make it easy for new developers to get started?
Chemistry
Scott Becker

* Developing and Using Pluggable Type Systems

A pluggable type system extends a language's built-in type system to confer additional compile-time guarantees. We will explain the theory and practice of pluggable types.
Cooking
Werner Dietl, Michael Ernst

* Easy Beats Open: The Challenge of Growing Open Source

"Open Source, in its majestic equality, guarantees both programmers and non-programmers alike the right to alter and recompile their software." The battle for Open Source Legitimacy is largely over: in many sectors, it's actually the preferred alternative. In the task-focused world that most casual computer users inhabit, however, "open-ness" is a meaningless abstraction and the walled gardens of closed source competitors offer compelling advantages. In this session, I'll explore the reasons that people make their choices, point out why "moral arguments" about open source are unlikely to change those choices, and discuss ways that our communities can further the ideals of Open Source without demonizing Grandpa's iPad.
Culture
Jeff Eaton

* Logic Lessons That Last Generations

In the 1980s, my grandfather reached onto the bookshelves of his cigar-smoke-seasoned garage laboratory and pulled down a three-ring binder that would change my life. Come hear how a 50-year-old introduction to binary logic has managed to stay relevant after all these decades, and what it means for our own efforts to teach and document technical subjects.
Culture
Ian Dees

* Open Source and Intellectual Property - Busting [some of] the Myths

"If it's open source, that means it's public domain, right?" "Well, it's fair use if you only copy 5% of it." "I know, let's get a trademark and then nobody can use our idea!" A discussion of common myths about intellectual property and how it applies to open source.
Business
Paula Holm Jensen

* Open Source Music

What kind of open source music can you make? All kinds! Let's get our feet wet and jam!
Hacks
Cameron Adamez

* Practical Lessons from Exotic Languages

Esoteric programming languages never really get the attention they deserve in the mainstream programming culture. We'll examine idioms from several exotic languages and explain how they can improve the quality of more common codebases.
Cooking
Corbin Simpson

* Pro-Style Code Review

Code review is awesome. Do more of it.
Business
Lennon Day-Reynolds

* Using XMonad for a No-Nonsense, Highly Productive Linux Desktop Experience

Many Linux desktop environments try to be easy to use for the average user, but that's not you. You're at your computer all day writing code; you don't want to mess around with *dragging windows* or (ugh) watching *animated transitions*. David Brewer will demonstrate how by using xmonad, a tiling window manager, you can free yourself from the tyranny of the mouse.
Cooking
David Brewer

Favorite proposals for this user

* Kotlin: Making JVM a Better Place

Learn about Kotlin — a modern programming language targeting JVM (and JavaScript). Kotlin not only interoperates transparently with Java and re-uses all the existing Java libraries, but even allows you to make those libraries _better_. This session demonstrates how existing Java libraries may be enhanced in Kotlin.
Chemistry 2012-01-28 19:12:37 +0000
Andrey Breslav

* Opening Open Source: Making Your Project Friendly to Everyone

Many open source projects run into the question: how do we get more people involved? How do we grow our contributors? How do we make our community more diverse?
Culture 2012-02-28 19:38:27 +0000
Pam Selle

* Programming in the Future

How does programming change and what will it be like in 25 years when you take your flying car to the office? Do the past 25 years of Perl give us enough perspective to see 25 years into the future? We'll look at recent progress, new features, and see how you can use a deeper knowledge of the inner workings to revolutionize your approach solving problems today.
Chemistry 2012-03-17 06:59:40 +0000
Eric Wilhelm

* Putting the ideas together, a whirlwind tour of Modern Perl

Modern Perl is awesome. You can do amazing things and get stuff done with so much less code than before. You can turn this: say join(" ", reverse(split(" ", $string))); into $string->split(" ")->reverse->join(" ")->say; If you've ever written in Perl and found it not to your taste, or used to use Perl but now use something else, come to this talk to see if Perl in 2012 is something you can get excited about again.
Cooking 2012-03-16 14:31:36 +0000
Jacinta Richardson

* Reading Rainbow: How to Read Code and Documentation

One of the best methods for learning new coding techniques is to read open source code. However, unlike normal books, code isn't meant to be read from top to bottom, beginning to end. Instead, code is more like a choose-your-own-adventure book, where each function can take you down a different path. I'll highlight some well documented open source projects, what makes them easy to get started for readers, and how to get started learning a new technology. For veteran developers, this talk will point out common pitfalls in documentation and how to avoid them for beginners.
Culture 2012-03-21 18:30:03 +0000
Jerry Cheung

Open Source Bridge 2011 Birds of a Feather

Favorite sessions for this user

* Android

Android 3.1 and beyond
BOF
Sean Sullivan

Open Source Bridge 2011

Favorite sessions for this user

* "Why did you do that?" You're more automated than you think.

Your brain is really good at surviving in neolithic Africa, but not because of our powers of higher levels of thought; they're much too slow. Humans are so successful as a species because we're champions at automating things, including our own thoughts and behaviours. What's fascinating is that we're profoundly unaware of just how much our own lives run on automatic, and just how much our own behaviour is influenced by external factors. Join internationally acclaimed speaker Paul Fenwick as we examine the fascinating world of the human mind.
Culture
Paul Fenwick

* Give a Great Tech Talk

Why do so many technical presentations suck? Make sure that yours doesn't. Josh Berkus and Ian Dees will show you how to share your ideas with your audience by speaking effectively and (when the situation warrants it) showing your code.
Culture
Ian Dees, Josh Berkus

* GraphViz: The Open-Source Body Scanner for Code, Systems, and Data

Do you generate, manage, or analyze a lot of data? Do you develop software? Do you like pretty pictures? If your answer was "yes" to zero or more of these questions, this talk is for you.
Chemistry
Matt Youell

* Hacker Dojo: Anarchy with Respect

Imagine an open source project was an actual place: a place where people volunteer to make something better; contribute their time, knowledge and resources; a place to share ideas or just to get work done. Hacker Dojo is for hackers and thinkers and this session will describe how the open source ethos can successfully be applied to a physical space.
Culture
Kitt Hodsden

* How to Ask for Money

Have a project that just needs some cash to get off the ground? Need someone to fund beer and food for an event? Have a great idea and want to get paid for implementing it? Come find out how we did it.
Business
Selena Deckelmann, J Chris Anderson, Teyo Tyree

* IRL: How Do Geeks Undermine Their Presentations and Conversations with Body Language

Many geeks are uncomfortable interacting IRL with clients or audiences but you don't have to be. There are some simple physical tricks to keeping an audience (of 1 or 1k) engaged and not undermining your skills and yourself.
Hacks
Sarah Novotny

* Kick Asana

"Yoga for Geeks", sometimes known as "Yoga for Long-Haul Travelers", returns to Open Source Bridge! Come with your stiff shoulders, sore wrists, tight hips and aching back. Leave with ideas on how to incorporate 5 minutes of practice into your busy day to care for your body and mind.
Culture
Sherri Koehler

* Law is Code, and We're Here to Open Source It

Anyone can show how to save the world. We tell how to receive unsolicited love letters while doing it.
Culture
Robb Shecter, Lisa Hackenberger

* Learn Tech Management In 45 Minutes

It took me two years to get a master's in tech management. I save you $40K and give you the short version.
Business
Sumana Harihareswara

* Modern Perl Made Painless

Improvements in Perl 5 over the past several years allow great programmers to do great things with less code. You too can turn your Perl 5 code from mere scripting into powerful, clear, and modern programming--with help from a few tools the world's best Perl programmers already know and love.
Cooking
Chromatic X

* Morning Keynote - Hacking for Freedom

The last year has shown the Internet and computers to be a major force for freedom and self-determination around the world. The presenter discusses his work as a hacktivist. Working with Anonymous and Telecomix, he has helped organized protests in support of WikiLeaks, provided communications support to Egypt and the Middle East, and generally fought the good fight.
Culture
Peter Fein

* Open Source at Microsoft - Less Evil and More Organized Than You'd Think

There's more real open source going on at Microsoft than you'd think.
Business
Scott Hanselman

* Parrot: State of the VM

Parrot is an ambitious and long-lived project that aims to be a VM for interoperable dynamic language implementation. We'll take a look at what Parrot's developers have been doing of late, what kind of awesome goodies we've plundered from the OSS world and where we want to go in the next year.
Chemistry
Christoph Otto

* Preventing Runtime Errors at Compile Time

Are you tired of null pointer exceptions, unintended side effects, SQL injections, concurrency errors, mistaken equality tests, and other run-time errors that appear during testing or in the field? A compile-time tool named the Checker Framework has found hundreds of such errors. Oracle plans to include it in the Java 8 javac, but you can use it today to improve your code and avoid errors.
Cooking
David Lazar, Michael Ernst, Werner Dietl

* Sales-fu

Tricky to master. Sometimes the last thing you care about. (Let me code already, dammit.) However, a small amount of work on your sales-fu will pay off. So let's do this thing.
Business
Amye Scavarda

* The Independent Software Developer

So you love open source? Spend more time doing what you love: go into business for yourself.
Business
Peat Bakke

* Turning Mediocre Products Into Awesome Products

A holistic approach to design for people through sketching, product blueprints, and team overlap (used by Apple and others).
Business
Jeremy Britton