Sarah Beecroft's favorites

Favorite sessions for this user

* A Tangled Tale

Forum-based interactive learning is an important open tech community activity. We will look at a storytelling-based example from the past.
Culture
Bart Massey

* Control Emacs with Your Beard: the All-Singing All-Dancing Intro to Hacking the Kinect

See! The Amazing Future of Human-Computer Interaction! Behold! The Awesome Power of Open-Source Libraries and Cheap Video-Game Accessories! Fake Beards!
Hacks
Devin Chalmers, Greg Borenstein

* Designing Error Aggregation Systems

So often we’re solely focused on the performance of our production systems. When disaster strikes, your team needs to know when error conditions begin, where they’re coming from, frequency, and an indication of the last time they occurred. Parsing logs isn’t fast enough, and email can’t keep up or preserve metadata.
Cooking
Gavin McQuillan

* How to Ask for Money

Have a project that just needs some cash to get off the ground? Need someone to fund beer and food for an event? Have a great idea and want to get paid for implementing it? Come find out how we did it.
Business
Selena Deckelmann, J Chris Anderson, Teyo Tyree

* Morning Keynote - Hacking for Freedom

The last year has shown the Internet and computers to be a major force for freedom and self-determination around the world. The presenter discusses his work as a hacktivist. Working with Anonymous and Telecomix, he has helped organized protests in support of WikiLeaks, provided communications support to Egypt and the Middle East, and generally fought the good fight.
Culture
Peter Fein

* Mozilla School of Webcraft @P2PU

P2PU School of Webcraft: Web developer training that’s free, open and globally accessible.
Culture
John Britton

* Online Community Metrics: Tips and Techniques for Measuring Participation

Do you know what people are really doing in your open source project? Having good community data and metrics for your open source project is a great way to understand what works and what needs improvement over time, and metrics can also be a nice way to highlight contributions from key project members. This session will focus on tips and techniques for collecting and analyzing metrics from tools commonly used by open source projects. It's like people watching, but with data.
Culture
Dawn Foster

* Open Source GIS Desktop Smackdown

See the leading open source GIS desktop systems solve real world problems.
Chemistry
David Percy, Darrell Fuhriman, Christian Schumann-Curtis

* Put THAT in Your Pipe and Deploy It!

A deployment pipeline combines several development best practices, fully automated and taken to their logical extreme. The result is almost magical: changesets go in one end, and fully-tested software packages come out the other. We'll take a tour of the components of a deployment pipeline, with concrete examples showing how to use Hudson, Rake, and Puppet to deploy PHP projects.
Cooking
David Brewer

* Seven Habits Of Highly Obnoxious Trolls

Developing more effective habits isn't just for the good guys. We'll discuss seven methodologies that make trolls more effective---and tell you what you can do about it.
Culture
Bart Massey, Selena Deckelmann, Duke Leto

* Transit Appliances

Disruptively low-cost real-time transit displays
Culture
Chris Smith

Favorite proposals for this user

* "You want me to test this !?!?" - Lessons learned from testing legacy code

In this talk I'll explore stategies for getting testing going inside your project, drawing upon experiences of making legacy code more testable.
Cooking 2011-02-02 04:22:53 +0000
John Mertic

* Build a DSL *Fast* With M4

The M4 macro preprocessor is a tool that inspires fear in the hearts of many open tech developers. It shouldn't. I'll show you how to build domain-specific languages quickly and easily in M4.
Cooking 2011-03-15 21:40:18 +0000
Bart Massey

* Community Source in EDU: Open Source Education

How are educational institutions working together to build technologies tailored to their needs and combine resources using open practices? Learn from examples in courseware (eg, Sakai), multimedia (eg, Opencast Matterhorn), and administrative systems (eg, Kuali).
Culture 2011-03-30 20:34:11 +0000
Nathan Angell

* FOSS Tools for Photographers

In this talk, Tim Harder will introduce you to all the crazy cool things you can do with FOSS panoramic photography tools like Hugin, open source viewers and more.
Cooking 2011-03-22 20:54:46 +0000
Tim Harder

* Git vs Subversion: The pragmatic showdown

If there's something that is beginning to challenge the age old "vi vs emacs" agrument, it's a projects choice of version control system. In this talk we'll throw the religious and technical arguments out the window of this debate, focusing instead on the pragmatic side of the argument. If you are wanting to figure out which VCS is better for your team and your project, this talk will give you practical advice about both to help you make a more informed decision.
Cooking 2011-02-22 16:48:28 +0000
John Mertic

* Introduction to OpenStack

The OpenStack project was launched last summer during OSCON by Rackspace, NASA, and a number of other cloud technology leaders in an effort to build a fully-open cloud computing platform. It is a collection of scalable, secure, standards-based projects consisting of compute, storage, images, and more. This session will introduce the projects, the principles behind it, and how to get started.
Cooking 2011-03-30 22:04:42 +0000
Eric Day

* Investigating Open Source Software Adoption in Governmental Contexts

Many value-creating strategies, products, and processes rely on information systems. Yet enabling access to these vital information resources through the procurement, implementation, and use of proprietary software is often complicated and costly. Proponents of open source software (OSS) claim that robust and yet affordable solutions are available because software engineers and programs around the world are able to contribute to source code that is open for anyone to modify and maintain overtime. This production model has shifted the notion of software as the intellectual property of a vendor, to a resource for all. However, questions remain about the viability of OSS for businesses and non-profits. For example, organizations seeking software-based solutions require the security of knowing that the software will not compromise their larger information infrastructure and hurt their business. Some software vendors now provide stable versions of open source software, which they call “vendor driven open source” that combine the strengths of open source with the security of having a direct contract with a company to provide technical/user support and software documentation. Through an exploratory field study of OSS use within city and state government, the researcher seeks insight into its viability for work operations.
Culture 2011-03-16 18:07:06 +0000
Erica Wagner

* LibreOffice and OO.org - The Evolution of Office

By founding the Document Foundation, a major part of the OpenOffice.org community left Oracle for speeding up development. This session shows how OO.org merged with Go-Oo and other projects to LibreOffice and how it is technically different from OO.org releases.
Chemistry 2011-02-22 00:05:44 +0000
Markus Franz

* MongoDb clustering: recipes and tall tales from a high-traffic production system.

Our production environment used an established, well-known Hybrid Cloud hosting company who offered the best IO bang for the buck., including all the bells and whistles: Web-based interface, Ubuntu support, good support and better performance than their competitors. The gotcha was that their massive lead in IO performance was due to their use of SAN storage mounted to each vm via iSCSI. As it turns out, once in a while this storage link would 'hiccup' every once in a while. The effect on MySQL was catastrophic, IOWAIT would go through the roof, and although the box was still up, it was dead as a doornail in terms of workload. It took us a day or tow to figure out what was happening, and then to also figure out that this was happening on the MongoDb replicas as well.
Cooking 2011-03-16 04:51:29 +0000
Jeff Griffiths

* Open source geocoding in PostGIS

We will explore the basics of "geocoding" (finding latitude/ longitude from an address string) and "reverse geocoding" (vice-versa) using the PostGIS TIGER geocoder.
Cooking 2011-03-29 18:35:49 +0000
Webb Sprague

* Open source, offline, custom mapping on the iPad

The MapBox team has been creating offline and mobile map browsing experiences that make it possible for users to better take advantage of geo-visualizations when working in the field. This presentation will focus specifically on the development of the MapBox iPad application, looking at the use cases that drove its development and the open source software stack that made it possible.
Cooking 2011-02-07 23:29:31 +0000
Justin Miller

* Oregon, Academia & Open Source: Highlights from the OSU Open Source Lab

You’re likely already aware that the Oregon State University Open Source Lab hosts some of the world’s most high-profile open source projects, from the Linux Kernel to the Apache Software Foundation. But did you know that OSU Open Source Lab releases its own software, teaches university students about open source development and that we’re spinning up a testing cluster for open source projects?
Culture 2011-03-29 21:28:55 +0000
Jeff Sheltren

* PHP and Multiple Inheritance ( or lack thereof )

In this talk, we'll survey what the problems with multiple inheritance are, how you can impliment a form of this today, and what's coming in PHP to better handle this problem.
Chemistry 2011-02-13 21:28:10 +0000
John Mertic

* Transit data hacking with the mobile web

The initial implementation of Nextbus used a jQTouch-based web client talking to the Translink API via a server-side proxy written in PHP. I eventually added basic stop search history support using localStorage, and recently have re-factored the app significantly: * a less webkit-centric interface * completely new workflow based around Geolocation instead of stop number lookup
Hacks 2011-03-16 05:16:47 +0000
Jeff Griffiths

* We should own our communications infrastructure, right?

As events in Egypt have shown dramatically, networks aren't always managed in the interests of their users. The actors might look different here in the US, but the effect isn't all that different.
Culture 2011-02-03 22:07:50 +0000
Russell Senior