Larissa Shapiro's favorites

Open Source Bridge 2013 Birds of a Feather

Favorite proposals for this user

* Code N Splode / Geek Feminism Meetup

Join us for a meetup, then we'll go to the party together!
BOF 2013-06-19 21:30:27 +0000
Audrey Eschright, Addie Beseda

* PyLadies + OpenHatch: Make your first contribution to OSS!

Contribute with us! PyLadies PDX and OpenHatch are teaming up to host this drop-in session for those who want to contribute to open source, but don't know how to get started. Learn the basics and get set up with OpenHatch. Goal is to submit a patch by the end of the night!
BOF 2013-05-29 21:28:06 +0000
PyLadies PDX, Asheesh Laroia

Open Source Bridge 2013

Favorite sessions for this user

* Agile from the Open Source Trenches: Making agile work for Wikipedia engineering teams

Wikipedia’s innovative language and mobile engineering projects use agile development to create high-quality features and apps in faster iterations. This talk examines what works and what doesn’t when using agile development for large open source projects. This talk will help developers and engineering managers better implement a successful agile process for their open source projects.
Culture
Alolita Sharma

* Bugs, bugs, bugs!

Bugmasters from Wikimedia, Mozilla, and GNOME argue entertainingly about bug management. We shall reveal our best Bugzilla hacks as well as waxing philosophical about open source project developer communities!
Culture
Liz Henry, Andre Klapper

* Citizenship Online: Open Source Politics

Online deliberation refers to applications which help communities make decisions. This varies from Exploratory deliberation, like Amazon reviews, where an individual makes a decision by consulting their community, to very structured Decision Making deliberations where a community needs to forge a single legally and logically defensible decision.
Culture
Ele Munjeli

* Diversity in open source: What's changed in 2012 and 2013

A few stories we will cover: * 20% women attendees at PyCon US 2013 * 85% of JSConf attendees donated to women in open tech/culture * The success of Black Girls Code * Conferences with 100% white male speakers are now called out for not trying hard enough to find good speakers * Mozilla's adoption of community guidelines that prevent advocacy of discrimination on Planet Mozilla and other Mozilla forums * The rapid growth of PyLadies
Culture
Valerie Aurora, Sumana Harihareswara, Ashe Dryden, Liz Henry, Asheesh Laroia

* DIY: Creativity and Open Source

Panelists will discuss their uses of open source tools in creative applications, from design to art to hardware.
Culture
Melissa Chavez, Sarah Sharp, Cloë Latchkey, Cameron Adamez

* FAIL is Not a Four-Letter Word

Projects fail. Companies crash and burn. Screws fall out all the time; the world is an imperfect place. Just because it happens doesn’t mean we can’t do our best to prevent it or—at the very least—to minimize the damage when it does. As a matter of fact, embracing failure can be one of the best things you do for your organization.
Culture
VM Brasseur

* FirefoxOS

FirefoxOS is Mozilla's response to the problems that it sees with the mobile space. Walled gardens, platform fragmentation, and single-purpose SDKs in non-web programming languages threaten to close off the open web from the mobile space. In this presentation I will be covering the basics of FirefoxOS, and how it is the only mobile OS that answers to nobody but you.
Chemistry
Benjamin Kero

* How My Kids Are Learning to Program By Talking

My children have patiently tolerated a number of teach-STEM-quick schemes their dad has brought home. They've taught robots to dance, created simple animations using Scratch, and, quite frankly, made a lot of poop jokes. What's missing from these programming tools was storytelling. The ones we tried focused either on easy interactivity or expressive power. If only there were a way to combine the two... oh, wait, there was—46 years ago!
Culture
Ian Dees

* Keynote — Alex “Skud” Bayley

Keynote by Alex “Skud” Bayley
Culture
Alex Bayley

* Kicking Impostor Syndrome In The Head

Impostor syndrome -- the persistent belief that any minute everyone around you is going to figure out you're not at all qualified -- happens to a majority of the tech industry; nobody talks about it, because nobody wants to be the first to admit it. This talk confronts that feeling head-on, and addresses ways to readjust your perceptions of your accomplishments to accurately reflect reality.
Culture
Denise Paolucci

* Let The Internet Work For You

Creating a successful Open Source project isn’t intuitive, or easy. Converting a brilliant idea into a working code base, then publishing it to Github (with significant adoption) is hard enough, nevermind building an ideal development and release workflow. Sometimes, getting your OSS code out to the community is the easy part -- then the real work ensues. Juggling between the roles of; creator, maintainer and contributor while managing the interests of the group effort (IRC, mailing lists etc) and issue trackers can quickly scale from simple and exciting, to a time consuming full time job. I plan to take you on a ride, demonstrating how Open Source developers can leverage free service offerings (for open source) to make your life as a project maintainer easier and more rewarding; from development and QA automation through to continuous deployment.
Cooking
Sebastian Tiedtke

* Low-Friction Personal Data Collection

Have you ever wanted to track your movements, sleep, what you eat, who you spend time with, and all sorts of other personal data? In this talk I'll describe the tools I've been able to successfully use to track aspects of my life.
Cooking
Aaron Parecki

* Morning Keynote: James Vasile

Open source!
Culture
James Vasile

* Morning Keynote: Ashe Dryden

It's been scientifically proven that more diverse communities and workplaces create better products and the solutions to difficult problems are more complete and diverse themselves. Companies are struggling to find adequate talent. So why do we see so few women, people of color, and LGBTQ people at our events and on the about pages of our websites? Even more curiously, why do 60% of women leave the tech industry within 10 years? Why are fewer women choosing to pursue computer science and related degrees than ever before? Why have stories of active discouragement, dismissal, harassment, or worse become regular news?
Culture
Ashe Dryden

* Negotiation: Because You're Worth It

There's only one person who wins when you don't negotiate, and it's not you. But, as any logician will tell you, that doesn't tell us about what happens when you do negotiate. I'm here to help!
Business
Noirin Plunkett

* No, I Won't Contribute to Your Open Source Project

The growth of the open community is inspiring. Yet despite this, most projects find it remarkably difficult to get people to contribute. Why?
Culture
VM Brasseur

* Open Sourcing Depression

In the spirit of open source, I'd like to shine a spotlight on depression. Not because it's easy, but because it's important. Mental illness affects many of us, but the stigma attached to it dissuades most people from talking about it openly. That's not how we make progress. With this talk, I want to do my part.
Culture
Edward Finkler

* Product Management in the Open (Source) - community and direction

Product Management is a generally well defined discipline inside large corporate organizations. But how does it work in the open source world? Do we need it? How does product consensus happen in open source?
Business
Larissa Shapiro

* Quantitative community management

In this talk, you will learn the state of the art in community measurement, common mistakes made in surveying, and how to actively use data to improve activity within a project.
Culture
Asheesh Laroia

* Sharing Beyond "Sharing": Fostering an Open Sharing Culture in the Philippines

Filipinos are known for sharing. From chain text messages, to photos, to videos, even to gossip and covering recent events in our own little communities, there seems to be an openness to sharing information: in fact, the Philippines is the so-called "social networking capital of the world". But can this openness to sharing information translate into the open source movement? I seek to provide possible answers to that question.
Culture
Josh Lim

* The "Oh Shit" Graph: What We Can Learn From Wikipedia's Editor Decline Trend

Wikipedia and the other Wikimedia projects have been hemorrhaging editors for the past five years. We're going to talk about the reasons why, how they can affect other projects, and what you can do to prevent it in yours.
Chemistry
Brandon Harris

* The Care and Feeding of Volunteers: Lessons from Non-Profits and OSS

Volunteers are the lifeblood of OSS projects. From behemoths like the Linux Foundation to every little project on SourceForge, volunteers keep things moving forward. Retaining happy and motivated volunteers is a crucial step in creating a healthy organization. In this talk, I will discuss the whys and wherefors of encouraging and directing your volunteers in the context of both traditional non-profits and OSS projects.
Culture
Kat Toomajian

* Training the trainers

This long session is a tutorial, with exercises, on how to run welcoming, effective outreach events targeted at bringing newcomers into your communities.
Cooking
Asheesh Laroia

* We, the people.

Its a simple talk. About Us. We shall, explain things as they are around us, how we got into the community, give suggestions on how people can help more people get into the community from a similar environment.
Culture
Sucheta Ghoshal, Harsh Kothari

* Wikipedia's new editing system, and how you can use it too

Learn about Wikimedia's new OSS Javascript visual editor for HTML, how it works and how you can use it in your Web projects
Chemistry
Trevor Parscal, Roan Kattouw

Open Source Bridge 2012

Favorite sessions for this user

* A Crash Course in Tech Management

'Programmer' and 'Manager' are two different titles for a reason: they're two different jobs and skill sets. If you have managerial aspirations (or have had them foisted upon you), come to this session to learn some of the tricks of the managerial trade.
Business
VM Brasseur

* A Snapshot of Open Source in West Africa

Ever wonder why Wikipedia fund raising focuses that much on Africa? Are you curious about what Open Source means for West Africans? What it is used for and where it is going? Join to hear real world examples about us trying to build communities and businesses around open source in West Africa.
Business
Renaud Gaudin

* Building Developer Platforms

How do you transform your site or service into a platform others build on top of? How do you clear the path, lower the barriers, and make it easy for new developers to get started?
Chemistry
Scott Becker

* Coordinating Usability Testing in Free Software

Freedom 4: The freedom to use the program effectively, efficiently and satisfactory. For a software to truly be free, people need to be able to easily use it without help. A primer to usability testing in a distributed and independent development environment.
Cooking
Jan-Christoph Borchardt

* Easy Beats Open: The Challenge of Growing Open Source

"Open Source, in its majestic equality, guarantees both programmers and non-programmers alike the right to alter and recompile their software." The battle for Open Source Legitimacy is largely over: in many sectors, it's actually the preferred alternative. In the task-focused world that most casual computer users inhabit, however, "open-ness" is a meaningless abstraction and the walled gardens of closed source competitors offer compelling advantages. In this session, I'll explore the reasons that people make their choices, point out why "moral arguments" about open source are unlikely to change those choices, and discuss ways that our communities can further the ideals of Open Source without demonizing Grandpa's iPad.
Culture
Jeff Eaton

* Free for Open Source: Marketing to Developers

Developers, like hipsters are simultaneously dead simple and infuriatingly difficult as marketing targets. Learn how supporting open source can be used as a tool to entice developers into your product's world.
Business
Michael Bleigh

* How Not to Release Software

You've seen a million best practice talks. This is quite the opposite: I'll instruct you in the ways I've failed over twenty years of software development, and advise you how not to make the same mistakes.
Business
Laura Thomson

* How to Win Collaborators and Influence Community: Encouraging (& Not Discouraging) Novice Coders

Interested in helping others learn to code? How do you help give them a running start, without throwing roadblocks in their way? Come get better at helping other people get better.
Culture
Liene Verzemnieks

* How We Went Remote

Hiring remote workers is great for filling those holes on the team...but if you don't have the correct infrastructure in place you're just setting yourself--and your remote team members--up for a world of hurt. This session will detail how our engineering department went remote and thrived because of it.
Business
VM Brasseur

* Identity, Reputation and Gratitude: Designing for a Community

How is Wikipedia designing its user experiences? In a larger sense, how do you design for a collaborative community -- the type of social network where people make things together? Brandon Harris, senior designer for the Wikimedia Foundation, explains.
Chemistry
Brandon Harris

* Internationalization @Wikipedia: Helping Add the Next Billion Web Users

This presentation is about open source internationalization (i18n) tools and technologies that are being developed and rolled out to support 284 languages for Wikipedia communities that enable millions of users to read and edit Wikipedia content with open source IMEs and web fonts.
Chemistry
Alolita Sharma

* Introduction to Linux Containers

This presentation will be of interest to system administrators and developers that want to provide isolated environments for production applications or test machines without the overhead of virtualization.
Cooking
Brian Martin

* Keynote by Sumana Harihareswara

Sumana Harihareswara gave our opening keynote, "Be Bold: An Origin Story".
Culture
Sumana Harihareswara

* Keynote: Fear, Uncertainty, and Dopamine

Beer, cookies, psychopathy, happiness, regret—these are all things the world's greatest scientists have studied in detail. Learn how humans work, and how to get the most out of interacting with them.
Culture
Paul Fenwick

* Keynote: Open Source, Open Hostility, Open Doors

Jason Scott, a member of the activist preservation group Archive Team, describes how open source projects and outlook have helped and improved the achieving of the group's goals.
Culture
Jason Scott

* Open Education Tools for Mentoring and Learning

The internet is full of information. Some of this information was made to help people learn. A subset exists under open licenses. These open educational resources (OERs) are used all over the world for learning and teaching. This talk will cover what some of them are and explore ways they have been (and can be) used for mentors and self-learners--both as individuals and in peer-study groups.
Culture
Molly de Blanc

* Open Source and Intellectual Property - Busting [some of] the Myths

"If it's open source, that means it's public domain, right?" "Well, it's fair use if you only copy 5% of it." "I know, let's get a trademark and then nobody can use our idea!" A discussion of common myths about intellectual property and how it applies to open source.
Business
Paula Holm Jensen

* Outreach Events: My Triumphs, My Mistakes

We all love sprinting with other experts, but how do you design an event effectively to reach out to and train newbies? It takes more work than you might think (publicity, prep, structure, and followup), but here's how.
Cooking
Sumana Harihareswara, Asheesh Laroia

* Scaling Your Community by Nurturing Leaders

In this session, we’ll talk about strategies for nurturing, empowering and rewarding community leaders to help scale your open source community. Most of the examples will come from 10gen’s experience working with the community around the open source database MongoDB.
Business
Meghan Gill

* Text Lacks Empathy

Have you ever written a nice friendly email and gotten a reply that seems like they read a whole different email? Textual communication has special problems. This talk will help you mitigate them: ensuring that what you mean to say is what is understood; interpreting messages that seem totally out of whack; and increasing empathic bandwidth.
Culture
Michael Schwern, Noirin Plunkett

* The Art of Customer Engagement and Retention: Premium Support for Freemium Software

Your project won't be successful if people can't use it successfully. There are a lot of tricks to good tech support that won't break the bank.
Business
Chris "Fool" McCraw

* Thriving in Chaos: An Introduction to Systems Thinking

For centuries we have learned to solve problems with a linear approach. This originated with Isaac Newton in the sevententh century and assumes that everything in the world is connected through cause and effect. Systems thinking throws away that assumption and examines the universe as small pieces connected into a complex network. You will learn how a systems thinking approach can be used to create robust groups that don't have leaders.
Culture
Alex Kroman

* Toward an Open Source Process for Security Vulnerabilities

Security vulnerabilities can be a source of anxiety and lost sleep, or they can be a carefully managed opportunity to bring communities together, practice safe operational practices, and prevent problems. Join me to discuss how we can all manage our security issues sanely and cooperatively, and lose less sleep!
Business
Larissa Shapiro

* What the Hell Is Wrong with You People? Pushing Change Across an Organization from the Basement Office

You have a great idea, perhaps the best idea ever, but you work with a bunch of know-it-alls, scaredy cats, well poisoners and lazy asses. You need a project management cycle that praises, emboldens, listens and inspires. You need a project management cycle that works.
Business
Chris Chiacchierini, Chris Langford

* What We Talk About When We Talk About Project Management

We ask for a lot of things under the heading of 'project management'. This leads to pain and suffering when we are not clear for what we are asking for, or we're not set up to support what we're asking for. This is particularly special in open source companies and projects.
Business
Amye Scavarda

* When Google Maps Gives You Lemons, Make Lemonade

Make your life sweeter by replacing Google Maps with open-source alternatives.
Cooking
Wm Leler

* Why You Need to Host 100 New Wikis Just for Yourself

The Federated Wiki offers a new form of conversation well suited for charting our collective future.
Culture
Ward Cunningham

Favorite proposals for this user

* Documentation: Quick and Easy

Whether you’re just rolling out a new project, or you’re maintaining ten years and three major versions of legacy code, good documentation is vital for your users. But writing good docs doesn't need to be a long, painful process. This talk will get you started - and finished! - in no time.
Cooking 2012-03-14 01:05:02 +0000
Noirin Plunkett

Open Source Bridge 2011 Birds of a Feather

Favorite sessions for this user

* BIND and ISCDHCP Open Session

Ask (and maybe answer) questions about ISC's projects, BIND, DHCP, and whatever else. Open Source internet infrastructure and protocol geeks unite! Share the feature you want to see, ask questions, make suggestions....
BOF
Larissa Shapiro

Open Source Bridge 2011

Favorite sessions for this user

* "Don't Give that Book Away!": Why Every Project Needs an Open Source Book

So your project needs a book? Do you write it yourself, or do you approach a publisher? This talk walks you through everything that factors into this decision providing real world examples of projects and companies offering open source books.
Cooking
Tim O'Brien

* "Why did you do that?" You're more automated than you think.

Your brain is really good at surviving in neolithic Africa, but not because of our powers of higher levels of thought; they're much too slow. Humans are so successful as a species because we're champions at automating things, including our own thoughts and behaviours. What's fascinating is that we're profoundly unaware of just how much our own lives run on automatic, and just how much our own behaviour is influenced by external factors. Join internationally acclaimed speaker Paul Fenwick as we examine the fascinating world of the human mind.
Culture
Paul Fenwick

* A Tangled Tale

Forum-based interactive learning is an important open tech community activity. We will look at a storytelling-based example from the past.
Culture
Bart Massey

* Bitcoin 101

An introduction to the cryptocurrency system called Bitcoin. The cryptography, the economics of currency bootstrapping, and the traction its getting today.
Culture
Don Park

* Diary of an Open Source Sysadmin Entrepreur

Half the story of the building of Puppet Labs and half instruction on how to build your own company, Luke Kanies, the founder of Puppet and Puppet Labs, will tell how he built his company and product and how you can, too.
Business
Luke Kanies

* DNSSEC @ Mozilla

As the Internet world moves slowly towards implementing DNSSEC, this session aims to start at the basics of DNSSEC and goes on to discuss implementation details as well as best practices, some of the most common mistakes that happen during and after deployments and finally what’s in store for the near future.
Cooking
Shyam Mani

* Get 'Em While They're Young: Cultivating the Next Generation of Open Source Contributors

Many open source projects participate in college mentorship programs, but what about younger students? Should we be cultivating the next generation of contributors from an earlier age?
Culture
Jane Wells

* Give a Great Tech Talk

Why do so many technical presentations suck? Make sure that yours doesn't. Josh Berkus and Ian Dees will show you how to share your ideas with your audience by speaking effectively and (when the situation warrants it) showing your code.
Culture
Ian Dees, Josh Berkus

* How 5 People with 4 Day Jobs in 3 Time Zones Enjoyed 2 Years Writing 1 Book

Hear how a distributed team tackled a big project (a book about a large open source project) in our spare time. Along the way, we encountered tools, techniques, and working styles that may be useful to you in your own career—or at least serve as a humorous warning.
Business
Ian Dees

* How Governments are Building Communities with Open Source

This session will provide examples of major government uses of open source technology, and provide some examples and case-studies of how government is contributing to open source and the web.
Business
Chris Strahl

* How to Ask for Money

Have a project that just needs some cash to get off the ground? Need someone to fund beer and food for an event? Have a great idea and want to get paid for implementing it? Come find out how we did it.
Business
Selena Deckelmann, J Chris Anderson, Teyo Tyree

* IRL: How Do Geeks Undermine Their Presentations and Conversations with Body Language

Many geeks are uncomfortable interacting IRL with clients or audiences but you don't have to be. There are some simple physical tricks to keeping an audience (of 1 or 1k) engaged and not undermining your skills and yourself.
Hacks
Sarah Novotny

* Is your Community Connecting to the Future?

Are you taking the underlying infrastructure that allows you to do the cool stuff you do online for granted? Do you think that ubiquitous, affordable, high speed broadband will just happen? Merger mania in the telecommunications arena means we prosumers will have less and less of a choice in our connectivity options. What role can communities play in ensuring broadband communications infrastructure and connectivity strategies promote openness, and improve accessibility and responsiveness of government to citizens.
Culture
Mary Beth Henry

* Keeping Agile at the Heart of the Internet

BIND is the nameserver which runs 80% of DNS world wide... It is maintained by a non profit managed open source company and driven by an international user and developer community. What does product management, using scrum, on an open source project, with developers on three continents, look like?
Business
Larissa Shapiro

* Learn Tech Management In 45 Minutes

It took me two years to get a master's in tech management. I save you $40K and give you the short version.
Business
Sumana Harihareswara

* Marketing: You're Soaking In It!

Come join me as I dispel some of the clouds of pollution which obscure the name of marketing, show how it can help your projects, reveal how--whether you realize it or not--you already use marketing every day and how that's a very good thing indeed.
Business
VM Brasseur

* Morning Keynote - Hacking for Freedom

The last year has shown the Internet and computers to be a major force for freedom and self-determination around the world. The presenter discusses his work as a hacktivist. Working with Anonymous and Telecomix, he has helped organized protests in support of WikiLeaks, provided communications support to Egypt and the Middle East, and generally fought the good fight.
Culture
Peter Fein

* Online Community Metrics: Tips and Techniques for Measuring Participation

Do you know what people are really doing in your open source project? Having good community data and metrics for your open source project is a great way to understand what works and what needs improvement over time, and metrics can also be a nice way to highlight contributions from key project members. This session will focus on tips and techniques for collecting and analyzing metrics from tools commonly used by open source projects. It's like people watching, but with data.
Culture
Dawn Foster

* Open Source at Microsoft - Less Evil and More Organized Than You'd Think

There's more real open source going on at Microsoft than you'd think.
Business
Scott Hanselman

* Open Source Communities Panel

Learn from open source community leaders who work on projects big and small.
Culture
Audrey Eschright, Asheesh Laroia, Noirin Plunkett, Jane Wells, Chris Strahl

* Open Source: Open to whom?

What makes the culture of open source so hostile to women and how can we as individuals act to change it?
Culture
Valerie Aurora

* Open Source: Saving the World

Most of us get involved with open source as a way to solve the problems we face on a day-to-day basis. But technology in general, and open source software in particular, also provides the key to solving the more catastrophic problems that people face around the world today.
Culture
Noirin Plunkett

* Pulling the Plug

In order to keep a tree healthy, you have to prune its branches. This too is the case with an organization’s websites and projects. Let’s look at how Mozilla handles the end-of-life portion of a website’s life-cycle.
Business
Ryan Snyder

* Put THAT in Your Pipe and Deploy It!

A deployment pipeline combines several development best practices, fully automated and taken to their logical extreme. The result is almost magical: changesets go in one end, and fully-tested software packages come out the other. We'll take a tour of the components of a deployment pipeline, with concrete examples showing how to use Hudson, Rake, and Puppet to deploy PHP projects.
Cooking
David Brewer

* Sales-fu

Tricky to master. Sometimes the last thing you care about. (Let me code already, dammit.) However, a small amount of work on your sales-fu will pay off. So let's do this thing.
Business
Amye Scavarda

* Technical Debt

Technical debt is something that most project teams or independent developers have to deal with - we take shortcuts to push out releases, deadlines need to be met, quick fixes slowly become the standard. In this talk, we will discuss what technical debt is, when it is acceptable and when it isn't, and strategies for effectively managing it, both on an independent and team level.
Cooking
Elizabeth Naramore

* Turning Mediocre Products Into Awesome Products

A holistic approach to design for people through sketching, product blueprints, and team overlap (used by Apple and others).
Business
Jeremy Britton

* User, User, Who Art Thou?

What's going on in the mind of the user as they use your system? Did they choose it, or was it chosen for them? Do they like it or hate it? How can you tell? This talk discusses the types of users that exist, and their motivations.
Cooking
Jacinta Richardson