Sam Keen's favorites

Favorite sessions for this user

* A day in the life of Facebook Operations

A look at the tools and practices used at Facebook to support the #2 site in the world.
Cooking
Tom Cook

* Being a Catalyst in Communities - The science behind the open source way

How does Red Hat have wild success with Fedora and other FLOSS projects? By following a method firmly rooted in humanism, practice, and science. Learn in this session how to be an effective catalyst in communities of users, contributors, and businesses.
Culture
Karsten Wade

* Developing Replication Plugins for Drizzle

The Drizzle Project is a fork of the MySQL 6.0 server. One of the many goals of Drizzle is to enable a large plugin ecosystem by improving, simplifying, and modernizing the application programming interfaces between the kernel and the modules providing services for Drizzle. This tutorial serves to showcase the new APIs for Drizzle's replication through a series of in-depth examples.
Chemistry
Padraig O'Sullivan

* Drizzle, Scaling MySQL for the Future

Current state of Drizzle.
Hacks
Brian Aker

* Hacking Space Exploration

From creating remote-sensing CubeSats to analyzing aerogel: how the public is hacking into open source space exploration.
Culture
Ariel Waldman

* HipHop for PHP

HipHop transforms PHP source code into highly optimised C++ and then compiles it using g++. It allows developers to continue writing complex logical directly with PHP but leverages the speed benefits of using C++. Currently, HipHop powers the majority of Facebook servers, making this more than just a theoretical exercise. This session will cover how HipHop works, how to setup HipHop and the small changes that may be required to applications to allow it to work with both PHP and HipHop.
Chemistry
Haiping Zhao

* Housetruck: Building a Victorian RV

As a "software person," I found the hard technologies of building with steel and wood made for a very different creative and hacking process. At the same time, I discovered many parallels to software development, embedded hardware, and even open-source philosophies.
Hacks
John Labovitz

* How To Report A Bug

Bug reports drive Open Source, but too often it's a hostile experience. As a user, how do you report a bug without being treated like you're dumping a sack of crap on the developer's doorstep? As a developer, how do you encourage users to report bugs? This is not a tutorial, but an examination of the social aspects of bug reporting.
Cooking
Michael Schwern

* Introduction to MongoDB

MongoDB is an open source, high-performance, schema-free, document-oriented database that is rapidly gaining in popularity among web developers. In this talk we'll introduce MongoDB and the features that make it great choice for your web applications.
Cooking
Michael Dirolf

* libcloud: a unified interface into the cloud

What is possible when you can consume servers on various hosting providers with nothing more than a python script? This talk will discuss libcloud, an Apache Incubator project dedicated to building standard interfaces into the cloud.
Cooking
Alex Polvi

* Node.js and you

Node.js is one of the most exciting things to happen to server-side development in the last few years. Here you'll find out why Node.js is a perfect fit for your next project and a better fit than existing languages for modern web development.
Cooking
Mikeal Rogers

* Non-visual location-based augmented reality using GPS data

Augmented Reality and Geolocation have been hot topics this year, but there has often been a confusion between aesthetics vs. practicality, and fantasy vs. reality. This presentation will highlight the advantages and disadvantages of visual and non-visual augmented reality. We'll tell stories from our experiences building location-aware social networks with custom proximity notification.
Hacks
Aaron Parecki, Amber Case

* Organizing user groups, a panel discussion

User groups are a vital part of the open source community. Learn more about how to start a group, keep it going, and make an existing group better from a panel of experienced user group organizers.
Culture
Igal Koshevoy, Jesse Hallett, Eric Wilhelm, Christie Koehler, gabrielle roth, Audrey Eschright, Sam Keen

* Practical Facebook stalking with Open Source tools

Facebook are full of juicy information about your friends and strangers alike! Learn how to use some simple open source tools and techniques to learn more about them.
Hacks
Paul Fenwick

* Release your hardware hacker potential with gEDA

Ever wanted to create your own printed circuit board? There are open source tools for that. This session will take you step-by-step through the process of creating a printed circuit board using the gEDA suite of electronic design automation tools. Beginners are welcome, no previous hardware experience required.
Cooking
Eric Thompson

* Speeding up your PHP Application

Is your Wordpress site too slow? What's this HipHop PHP thing? How do I write really fast PHP apps? Drop by to get the answers to these questions.
Hacks
Rasmus Lerdorf

* Sphinx - the ultimate tool for documenting your software project

Open source software projects can succeed or fail based on their documentation. Thanks to Sphinx, open source developers now have a "documentation framework" that provides convenient indexing and automatic syntax highlighting, integrates your documentation with your code, and can automatically generate a beautiful manual as a PDF document.
Cooking
Nate Aune

* The Fine Line Between Creepy and Fun

Social software is kind of a big deal right now. In the open-source spirit of transparency and dissection, let's talk about what makes social technology creepy, what makes it fun, and how to hack things to maximize your desired outcome.
Hacks
Audrey Eschright

* The Open Geo Stack

Location and mapping are making a huge impact on the web and mobile. Open Source is right there. Learn the elements of the geo stack, from mapping APIs to geo databases.
Cooking
Adam DuVander

* The Story of Spaz: How to Give Away Everything, Make No Money, and Still Win

What motivates us as developers? How do we define success? Throughout the development of Spaz, we've learned a lot about what works, what doesn't, and what really matters. Come to hear the story, and participate in the discussion of how we define success in open source.
Business
Edward Finkler

* The symfony framework behind the scenes at museum installations

The symfony framework is a full-stack web framework for PHP. It's great for building websites, but you might be surprised where else it comes in handy. David Brewer shows how Second Story uses symfony to build custom content management and delivery systems powering interactive installations ranging from collections of Disney memorabilia to maps plotting every monument at Gettysburg.
Cooking
David Brewer

* Transparent, Collaborative, Participatory - Grass Roots Implementation of the Open Government Directive

The Obama administration signed the Open Government Directive on its first day in office, promising to make government more collaborative, transparent and participatory. This panel will explore nongovernmental projects currently underway throughout the US and world that aim to forward this vision.
Culture
Mark Frischmuth

* Why the Sysadmin Hates Your Software

You've worked really hard on your software. It's stable and has lots of nice features and users love it. But your sysadmin hates it and complains about how hard it is to install, configure, and manage. What's up with that?
Chemistry
Steve VanDevender

* XHP for PHP

XHP is a PHP extension which augments the syntax of the language such that XML document fragments become valid PHP expressions. It fits somewhere between a templating language and a programmatic UI library. XHP allows you to use PHP as a stricter templating engine and offers a very straightforward way of implementing reusable, extensible components.
Cooking
Bob Baldwin

Favorite proposals for this user

* 'But It's Broken!' Advice for First-Time FOSS Project Patch Submitters

You've found a critical error in a widely-used FOSS system, you write a great fix, you submit it... and it is bounced, and you think the reason is lame. What to do? We'll guide you through the political minefield that is submitting your first patch to a FOSS project.
Culture 2010-03-30 06:44:51 +0000
Christophe Pettus, Josh Berkus

* CRUD for the Web: OData, GData, and You

Why do you have to relearn yet another API every time you want to really use someone's data source on the Web? It's time we moved beyond just consuming feeds -- we need full-function data access APIs! That's what the Open Data Protocol (OData) and the Google Data Protocol (GData) aim to do. Learn about these efforts, how they are used, and why you should adopt them for your next web API.
Chemistry 2010-03-25 18:54:32 +0000
Jason Mauer

* Developing easily deployable PHP Applications

Talks about how to develop PHP applications that can be deployed on many different platforms with ease.
Chemistry 2010-03-15 02:09:08 +0000
John Mertic

* Django 102 - past the introduction

You've been through the tutorials on Django, and now you want to deploy a real site in it - and you're lost. Let's fix that.
Cooking 2010-03-26 00:06:35 +0000
Chris Pitzer

* GeoDjango

Want to build that kick ass geo-site? Use Django!
Cooking 2010-03-26 00:10:52 +0000
Chris Pitzer

* Help! My webapp is slow and I don't know what to do!

One of your clients has asked you to have a look at their web application and to make it faster. Where do you start? Without looking at (or changing) the source code of the application, what can you do to make it better?
Cooking 2010-03-12 04:37:54 +0000
Francois Marier

* Javascript, the One True Language

JavaScript has long been considered a toy language, but new project focusing on server-side JavaScript the language could be the best choice for new development.
Cooking 2010-02-24 19:02:14 +0000
Stephen Woods

* Put Down the Superglobals! Secure PHP Development with Inspekt

Inspekt is a filtering and validation library for PHP. With a focus on ease of use, Inspekt makes writing secure PHP applications faster and easier. This talk covers the Inspekt library and the "input cage" concept, best practices when utilizing the library, and how to integrate Inspekt with existing applications and popular frameworks.
Cooking 2010-02-21 03:16:33 +0000
Edward Finkler

* Should there be a free software app store?

Since free software "is a matter of liberty, not price", developers and distributions are allowed to ask users to pay for free software (though most users can easily choose not to). Musicians like Radiohead have experimented with asking, but not requiring, users to pay for music (by choosing their own price, which could be $0). What would happen if we did this for free software?
Business 2010-03-26 00:53:46 +0000
Seth Schoen

* The Complex Ethics of Piracy

The Complex Ethics of Piracy This talk aims to replace the "piracy is good" vs "piracy is theft" debate with a more nuanced understanding. It will investigate when piracy is selfish; when it is civil disobedience; whether it is ever constructive for cultural industries, or whether it is ever, as copyright holders argue, "theft". I will conclude that each of these things is sometimes true about piracy, and that simple views are inadequate for understanding the ethical dimension of copyright infringement. Both pirates and copyright industries need to develop more subtle understandings of the morality of file sharing.
Culture 2010-03-30 04:24:31 +0000
Peter Eckersley

* The curious case of php|architect

How can a business that publishes twelve magazines, organizes two conferences and trains 2,000 developers a year in three different formats be managed in its entirety by a team of five people across two different countries? Why, through the magic of open-source software, clever hackery and a passion for great software
Business 2010-02-20 01:50:37 +0000
Marco Tabini

* The new schism: SQL vs. NoSQL

RDMS showed us the one true way to organize data, yet the NoSQL movement shows us how it fails. The faithful are confused and concerned. The heretics rally boldly in the streets with torches and pitchforks, yelling something about "doesn't scale," while the defenders of orthodoxy scream about the features and safeties these strange new gods lack, and do the apostates even realize it? As the philosophical storm brews, DB admins and developers must make fateful decisions that will affect the rest of the code's life. Here they will glean the first glimpses of the knowledge they will need to make informed choices and be spared the wrath of the database gods.
Chemistry 2010-03-29 23:17:58 +0000
Melissa Hollingsworth

* Using virtualization and automation to improve your web development workflow

Large-scale web projects use sophisticated staged deployment systems, but the prospect of setting these up can be daunting. Using virtualization and automated configuration puts the benefits within easy reach even for small projects. David Brewer explains how Second Story uses Linux, VMware Server, and AutomateIt to grease the wheels of development on their museum-sector projects.
Cooking 2010-03-29 15:42:24 +0000
David Brewer