Liz Henry's favorites

Open Source Bridge 2014

Favorite sessions for this user

* Performance strategies for delivering web fonts at Wikipedia scale

Wikipedia supports almost 300 languages for its multilingual content communities. As mixed script web pages become pervasive and non-Latin language content grows exponentially, a breakthrough technology of delivering webfonts on demand has been deployed across 900 Wikimedia sites. This talk discusses user benefits derived from this technological advance as well some of the performance and scalability improvements made to deliver fonts at Wikipedia scale.
Chemistry
Alolita Sharma

* "Why are these people following me?": Leadership for the introverted, uncertain, and astonished

So you've had an idea, or noticed a gap that needs filling, or wondered why no one's talking about an issue you care about. Like the motivated and competent person you are, you start working, or writing, or talking. People start noticing you, listening to you, even asking for your opinion about their own projects--and one day, you realize they're treating you just like you treat your own role models. You find this unsettling. Surely motivation and competence aren't that special, you think. You, a leader? Can't be. And if you actually are a leader, what do you do now?
Culture
Frances Hocutt

* A Few Python Tips

Nothing fancy here, just several tips that help you work effectively with Python. This talk is licensed CC BY; please feel free to reuse it at your company or conference.
Cooking
Sumana Harihareswara

* Build your own exobrain

Online services like "If This Then That" (IFTTT) are great for automating your life. However they provide limited ways for the end-user to add their own services, and often require credentials that one may normally wish to keep secret. The 'exobrain' project allows for service integration and extension on a machine *you* control.
Cooking
Paul Fenwick

* Civilizing IRC and forums: moderation strategies for mutual respect

As a project's public IRC channel or forum grows, it's hard to keep it friendly. People get frustrated with each other, people have "different" senses of humor, disagreements escalate...oh goodness, it can be a mess. This isn't great for retaining community members or welcoming new ones. I'll share my strategies for dealing with problems, learned at the scale of hundreds of forum threads, tens of thousands of forum visitors, and dozens of IRC chatters every day.
Culture
Britta Gustafson

* Crash Course in Tech Management

Managing is a skill which you can master just as you did programming. This session will introduce you to many of the skills and resources you’ll need to become a successful tech manager (and keep your team from wanting to string you up).
Business
VM Brasseur

* Data Wrangling: Getting Started Working with Data for Visualizations

Good data visualization allows us to leverage the incredible pattern-recognition abilities of the human brain to answer questions we care about. But how do you make a good visualization? Here's a crash course.
Cooking
Rachel Shadoan

* Data, Privacy, & Trust in Open Source: 10 Lessons from Wikipedia

Few people today are not concerned with the way data is used to enhance or subvert individual privacy. This is especially true on the Web, where open source technologies are behind much of what we interact with and use on a daily basis. As the most fundamental aspects of our lives become networked -- social relationships, work, finance, and even how we get our food -- how can we make sure that open source technologies foster a sense of trust with users, protect their privacy, and still give data scientists the tools they need to gain insight?
Culture
Steven Walling

* Deconstructing Open Source Contributions

Everyone wants to make contributing to open source projects more accessible and fun. But how do we do that? One way is to analyze past contributions to identify potential obstacles and opportunities for intervention and support. This workshop will use our own experiences as contributors to explore how the process works, using a simple but effective reflective activity.
Culture
Shauna Gordon-McKeon

* Distributed Agile Development or: How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love Remoties

This is the story of how the mobile web engineering team at the Wikimedia Foundation became an extremely high-functioning and successful agile team: by embracing - rather than shying away from - a distributed model. This talk will explore the agile team's journey and how we cope with the inherent tension of remoteness and the agile principle, 'The most efficient and effective method of conveying information to and within a development team is face-to-face conversation'.
Culture
Arthur Richards

* Extension Development with Mediawiki

Mediawiki is one of the most commonly used "wiki's" across a plethora of sites. So I will help you build your own "Mediawiki Extension" that will help you to enhance the features of your wiki.
Hacks
Richa Jain

* Feminist Point of View: Lessons From Running the Geek Feminism Wiki

The Geek Feminism wiki is one of the central resources for feminist activism in geek communities ranging from open source software to science fiction fandom. Learn how the GF wiki started, how it's run, and what we've learned about doing activism the wiki way.
Culture
Alex Bayley

* Freedom, security and the cloud

Cloud hosting is cheap. Cloud hosting is easy. What compromises are you making when you deploy to the cloud, both in terms of your security and in terms of your dependency on proprietary software?
Chemistry
Matthew Garrett

* Introduction to Sphinx & Read the Docs

Learn more about how to document your software projects with the most powerful open source documentation tool. You'll learn more about how to think about semantics in documentation, and how to use these tools to make great looking documentation.
Chemistry
Eric Holscher

* Keeping your culture afloat through a tidal wave of interest ~~\o/~~

During the height of interest to the project, there were often several new people arriving in the channel per day. That may not sound like a lot, but everyone had questions and would be interested in different things; it could take a twenty minute conversation or so with someone who knew a lot about the project in order to properly greet, inform, and orient new people. The founders didn't have a few spare hours around the clock to personally devote to making sure that each new arrival was welcomed, felt welcomed, had their questions answered, and had their willingness to contribute channeled into something which needed the help and suited their skills. There was a lot about this that we could have automated or dumped into a higher-latency format like email. The first time someone proposed automating the welcoming dance it was like they'd slapped me in the face. The personal touch bit was crucial, and automating it would have struck all the wrong notes. The project was supposed to be for people, by people, and showing that we're human and we're committed to keeping it small and personal was crucial to keeping the culture intact.
Culture
Azure Lunatic, Kat Toomajian

* Knitting for programmers

Yeah, you've seen us knitting during talks. I promise we're paying more attention than the people with their laptops open. Well, now learn how we do what we do... the programmer way. I'll start with the topology of individual stitches and go through geometry to design patterns, and by the end of it you'll know how to knit a sweater.
Hacks
Alex Bayley

* Life-Hacking and Personal Time Management for the Rest of Us

Almost all the books and articles out there about taking Agile methods into your personal life seem geared to people who have control over their schedules. What about those of us who have childcare, eldercare, or other incompressible schedule demands?
Hacks
H. Waterhouse

* Making Your Privacy Software Usable

Privacy enhancing technologies (PETs), like onion routing, PGP, and OTR often achieve a high level of security, but user experience (UX) built on top of the protocols is often a development afterthought. Without a concerted effort to examine how the system is used, people accidentally compromise their data or never attempt to use PETs. This talk will show you PET design done right and wrong through the lens of standard UX evaluation techniques. Our goal is to enable you to incorporate UX principles into your hacking from day 0.
Chemistry
Jen Davidson, Sean McGregor

* NerdCred++; How to Customize your Bash Prompt

The terminal is a powerful tool on any developer’s belt. The command line interface provides extensive functionality via simple entry of commands. In this workshop we will customize the development experience by adding personal ⭐︎flair⭐︎ and making the most of limited screen real estate. Customizing the prompt provides additional information and functionality with the bonus of flair. Participants will be able to take pride in custom craftsmanship with the result.
Hacks
Pamela Ocampo, Rachel Walker

* OpenStreetWhat? Mapping The World With Open Data

Come learn about OpenStreetMap, a Wikipedia-like project with over one million contributors aiming to map the entire world. We'll talk about the project, the data, and how to do some cool things with it.
Cooking
Justin Miller, Rafa Gutierrez

* Replacing `import` with `accio`: Compiling Pythons with Custom Grammar for the sake of a joke

In Python, overwriting builtin functions is fairly easy. You can even do it in the interpreter! But can you overwrite a statement, like import, just as easily? Let's go on an adventure, discovering how the import statement works, and how Python statements are defined in the CPython source code. We'll face some consequences of bootstrapping, and, to get our custom Harry Potter-themed Grammar to work, we'll have to compile a Python to compile a Python.
Chemistry
Amy Hanlon

* Slytherin 101: How To Win Friends and Influence People

Do you wish that you were better at getting people to do what you need them to do? Do you keep getting put in charge of things and then get stuck wondering how the heck you're supposed to get things done? Do you keep getting into conflicts with other people because of stuff you've said, and you aren't entirely sure why? Fortunately, Slytherin House has you covered. Come to this talk and learn the basics of how to hack human relationships, using the tools of cunning and ambition to achieve inter-House harmony. As long as you promise not to use these techniques to support the next Dark Lord, of course.
Culture
Denise Paolucci

* Stop Crying in the Bathroom and Start Your Own Business

The tech industry has a 'diversity problem' and companies are courting women, people of color and other marginalized people as the pressure mounts to hire someone besides 24-year-old cis, straight white male programmers. However, for many marginalized people, working in startups, agencies, and large tech companies can be a miserable, demoralizing experience that literally results in crying in the bathroom. There's more to life than startups. Come hear ideas for making your own path in the tech industry, without compromising your dignity or your mental health.
Business
Kronda Adair

* Tales from the Trenches: Battling Browser Bugs for "Fun" and (Non-)Profit

Web development used to be HARD. You basically had to rewrite your code for every new browser you wanted to support. But with modern browsers and libraries like jQuery, those dark days are over. Or are they? We pushed the limits of what the web can do while building VisualEditor (the new editor for Wikipedia) and found plenty of hilarious, insane, amazing and horrifying bugs in browsers even in 2014. All we needed to do was poke around in some unusual places.
Hacks
Roan Kattouw

* The joy of volunteering with open technology and culture

Volunteering is a fun way to explore your interests and passions. In this talk, I will detail my experiences in volunteering with open projects like Wikipedia and Mozilla. I will also talk about fun ways to introduce newbies into volunteering based on my experience with conducting outreach sessions for open projects.
Culture
Netha Hussain

* The Outreach Program for Women: what works & what's next

We've mentored and interned in the Outreach Program for Women, and we know it works -- it improves the gender balance inside open source communities. We'll discuss why it works, how it builds off of Google Summer of Code, and discuss replicating it, expanding it, and looking at the next step in the recruiting and inclusion pipeline.
Cooking
Sumana Harihareswara, Liz Henry

* The Promise of Collaborative Magic

Open source thrives on the idea of people helping one another in reaching their project's goals. But is it working the way that it's supposed to be? This session hopes to discuss the importance of constructive collaboration in our communities, how we encourage them, and what we can do if they're not working out the way they're supposed to.
Culture
Josh Lim

* Towards more diversity-friendly social networks

How can we make social networks more "diversity-friendly"? It starts with an anti-oppression attitude, embedded in the community guidelines and norms; and includes the right tools, technologies, and policies. This session will look at what does and doesn't work in a variety of online environments, and will include an annotated collection of resources on the wiki.
Culture
Jon Pincus, Deborah Pierce

* Unicorns Are People, Too: Re-Thinking Soft and Hard Skills

As developers, we tend to value hard skills that can be quantified or measured objectively. Job postings search for unicorns, but we are people first and foremost and being human isn't as easy as programming. While the code comes easily, the soft skills that make us human are complicated and difficult to get right. This talk will explore the danger of neglecting so-called "soft" skills, what we stand to lose by overvaluing technical skills, and alternatives to the hard and soft dichotomy.
Culture
Liz Abinante

* When Firefox Faceplants - what the fox says and who is listening

Ever seen Firefox crash and hesitated to press that 'Send the Report' button because you don't know what would happen next? This is what happens next.
Chemistry
Lars Lohn

* Write an Excellent Programming Blog

As a member of the open source community, do you contribute only code, or also words? Writing about programming benefits yourself and others. This talk outlines solid article structures, suggests topics to write about, explains how blogging about programming is special, and inspires you to write articles of enduring value.
Culture
A. Jesse Jiryu Davis

Favorite proposals for this user

* Anonymous Social Networks - Why we need them

There is a new type of social media causing quite a disruption in the industry. It is a social media where people create posts anonymously
Culture 2014-03-26 23:14:07 +0000
A.J. Weinzettel

* Balance: Being a Corporate Wage Slave While Loving Open Souce

How I went from contributing on the side to being hired to work on open source full-time.
Business 2014-03-27 19:01:45 +0000
Mika Epstein

* Effective Projects with Family and Friends

Always wanted to work on an open source project with family or close friends? We’ll talk through the joys and challenges, how to turn the latter into the former and create an effective working relationship.
Culture 2014-04-02 02:56:39 +0000
Catriona Buhayar, Bill Madill

* Fix Code, Delete Docs

Educators, authors, and co-workers are constantly demanding more code comments and documentation, yet none of them ever update it. The comments lie, the documentation exists in three variants, and still nobody knows how to make the code do the right thing.
Chemistry 2014-04-04 08:03:19 +0000
Eric Wilhelm

* From the Inside Out: How Self-Talk Affects Your Community

Identifying and discouraging negative self-talk is a simple thing, but it can have a huge impact on your community in a positive way. It increases self-confidence, improves morale, and generally results in happier, more productive community participants. This, in turn, will make you happy.
Culture 2014-04-04 16:50:29 +0000
Kat Toomajian

* Herculean Labors for Mortals: Lessons in making daunting tasks manageable

Lessons learned from messy migrations and unruly upgrades. Sometimes we inherit (or create!) big messes, and have to untangle them before we can make more progress. I'll talk about some past and current projects that seemed like they might require Xena: Warrior Project Manager, and techniques that allowed me and my team to succeed (or at least live to fight another day), focusing on what can be generalized to many circumstances and projects.
Culture 2014-04-02 15:19:14 +0000
Juliana Perry

* Meat Culture

Meatspace Chat is an open-source public chatroom with a simple premise: Every message you send includes a 2-second animated gif taken by your webcam. No accounts, no usernames, no permanent database. In this talk we’ll look at the community, projects, and cultural norms that have grown around the chat, and what happens when you chat with strangers face-to-face.
Culture 2014-04-04 18:21:37 +0000
Caleb Troughton

* Scaling Open Source Outreach

In 2013, we ran a dozen open source outreach events at college campuses and reached hundreds of students, but for every event we ran there were more invitations we didn't have the resources to accept. In 2014, we're focused on scaling our workshops that so that community organizers everywhere can use our materials and welcome more people into open source. In this talk, we'll discuss what works and what doesn't when it comes to scaling community outreach.
Culture 2014-04-04 19:39:12 +0000
Shauna Gordon-McKeon

* Systems programming as a swiss army knife

Why understanding some systems programming basics will make you a better developer.
Cooking 2014-03-28 03:12:24 +0000
Julia Evans

Open Source Bridge 2013

Favorite sessions for this user

* Agile from the Open Source Trenches: Making agile work for Wikipedia engineering teams

Wikipedia’s innovative language and mobile engineering projects use agile development to create high-quality features and apps in faster iterations. This talk examines what works and what doesn’t when using agile development for large open source projects. This talk will help developers and engineering managers better implement a successful agile process for their open source projects.
Culture
Alolita Sharma

* Bugs, bugs, bugs!

Bugmasters from Wikimedia, Mozilla, and GNOME argue entertainingly about bug management. We shall reveal our best Bugzilla hacks as well as waxing philosophical about open source project developer communities!
Culture
Liz Henry, Andre Klapper

* debugging without borders

Debuggers are great when you have intimate access to your codebase, server, and network. Sometimes, all you have is a web browser and some intuition, and you still have a problem to solve. What then?
Cooking
chris mccraw

* Diversity in open source: What's changed in 2012 and 2013

A few stories we will cover: * 20% women attendees at PyCon US 2013 * 85% of JSConf attendees donated to women in open tech/culture * The success of Black Girls Code * Conferences with 100% white male speakers are now called out for not trying hard enough to find good speakers * Mozilla's adoption of community guidelines that prevent advocacy of discrimination on Planet Mozilla and other Mozilla forums * The rapid growth of PyLadies
Culture
Valerie Aurora, Sumana Harihareswara, Ashe Dryden, Liz Henry, Asheesh Laroia

* DIY Electric Vehicles

Everybody today has heard of electric vehicles, yet almost nobody has ever seen one, touched one, or driven one. I think this is a shame and would like to correct that. Come join me for 45 minutes of explanation and demonstration about the basics of electric vehicles from electric bicycles all the way to passenger vehicles. Building these vehicles at home is easily within the realm of anybody unafraid to pick up a few simple tools and learn a few basic concepts.
Hacks
Benjamin Kero

* Failure and Wikipedia: how encyclopedias work

This talk is about my experience with promoting Wikipedia in Indian languages, OpenGLAM projects in India and the problems I've encountered. I also want to draw parallels to how the encyclopedia project itself, especially online works on notions of rough consensus, thereby articulating a specific political position for the community and reflecting a world view through the knowledge they produce.
Culture
noopur raval

* Firefox Bug Rodeo!

Hands-on Bugzilla wrassling, Firefox busting, barrel riding showdown. Enter the dazzling gladiatorial arena of BUG TRIAGE with MOZILLA! We will make bugzilla.mozilla.org accounts, practice reading and understanding bug reports, discuss why and how to investigate and add information to bugs, explore searches and reports, and feel the glorious feeling of contributing to open access to information and awesome browsers for all!
Cooking
Liz Henry

* It's OK to be Average

Open Source communities are often full of "the one who invented ___" people. They've written RFCs, gotten patents, published software that's already installed on every computer you'll ever buy. It can be kind of intimidating. But there's room for more than that--and welcoming more people can improve your project exponentially!
Culture
Noirin Plunkett

* Kicking Impostor Syndrome In The Head

Impostor syndrome -- the persistent belief that any minute everyone around you is going to figure out you're not at all qualified -- happens to a majority of the tech industry; nobody talks about it, because nobody wants to be the first to admit it. This talk confronts that feeling head-on, and addresses ways to readjust your perceptions of your accomplishments to accurately reflect reality.
Culture
Denise Paolucci

* Labor, ethics and computing

An exploration of labor and ethics from various points in the life of a computer -- from the day-to-day software programming and hardware inside the computer down to the materials used in various components. Includes the implications for open source hardware and software as well as possible future solutions.
Chemistry
Cameron Adamez

* More Code, More Problems

Some people will tell you that you need a large, full-stack framework to do web development The Right Way. These people are wrong.
Cooking
Edward Finkler

* Quick Cure for the Shame of Untested Software

As the founder of a company focused on software testing, I speak often to developers who admit in private: "Yes, testing is important... but we don't test." Reasons vary, but the basic problem is that testing is seen as too difficult and time-consuming with no apparent value for the effort. In this talk I hope to convince you that this problem is a false dilemma and show you how to get started testing software quickly and easily.
Cooking
Daniel Nichter

* Rust: A Friendly Introduction

Conventional wisdom says that writing high-performance code means working without the safety net of credible compile-time safety checks. Mozilla Research (a community of researchers, engineers, and volunteers) is trying to prove that conventional wisdom wrong by building Rust, a new systems programming language. Rust takes advantage of well-understood programming language technology to combine aggressive compile-time error checking with the high degree of direct control over the machine necessary to write efficient systems programs. By way of examples, I'll teach you how to use Rust to write fast and trustworthy code.
Cooking
Tim Chevalier

* Search-first writing for non-writers

Search-first writing makes you think about the structure of your document and product as a series of topics, instead of a big book. The days of linear documentation are over, or at least numbered. Users are much more likely to come to documentation through searches. As an open source creator, you may not have a writer to help you out with this, so how can you maximize their return on your minimal investment?
Cooking
Heidi Waterhouse

* Shall We Play A Game?

In just 1.5 hours, I will help you craft a computer game AI that will consistently beat you and your friends.
Chemistry
Bart Massey

* The Care and Feeding of Volunteers: Lessons from Non-Profits and OSS

Volunteers are the lifeblood of OSS projects. From behemoths like the Linux Foundation to every little project on SourceForge, volunteers keep things moving forward. Retaining happy and motivated volunteers is a crucial step in creating a healthy organization. In this talk, I will discuss the whys and wherefors of encouraging and directing your volunteers in the context of both traditional non-profits and OSS projects.
Culture
Kat Toomajian

* The Perl Renaissance

The Perl Renaissance is in full swing. Join internationally acclaimed speaker and White Camel Award winner Paul Fenwick as we explore some of the most freakin' amazing developments in the land of Perl!
Chemistry
Paul Fenwick

* The problem with passwords on the web and what to do about it

Handling user passwords safely is hard, but replacing passwords on the web in a reasonable way is even harder. Really, this should have been in the browser all along. This is where Persona comes in.
Chemistry
François Marier

* Using Secure Boot for the powers of good

Secure Boot is a technology for limiting the files that computers will boot. Used wrongly, it restricts user freedom and turns computers into appliances. How can we use it for real improvements in security without losing the ideals of general purpose computing?
Chemistry
Matthew Garrett

Favorite proposals for this user

* A Crash Course in Physical Computing

Bring your favorite microcontroller board and a breadboard and learn how to make lights blink and buzzers buzz from various inputs.
Hacks 2013-02-18 19:17:24 +0000
Cameron Adamez

* Agile Crafting

Estimating the time a project will take is pretty much the hardest thing in software, and I don't think that's any different for any other crafting deliverable. Of course, sometimes we have done something so often that we KNOW it takes 50 minutes to make a batch of raspberry jam, but that's not the same as estimation. So if we can't rely on our own estimation, or that of others, what can we do? We can timebox from the other direction. Instead of trying to figure out how long something will take, we can decide how long we have to spend on it. After all, you are the boss of your creative experiences. If you don't deliver on time, it's disappointing, but probably not the end of your career.
Hacks 2013-03-01 20:20:52 +0000
Heidi Waterhouse

* Building Google Voice with Rails, Backbone, and Twilio

Google Voice may seem like it's performing black magic, but every developer can integrate the same features into their applications today.
Cooking 2013-03-05 21:56:11 +0000
Kevin Whinnery

* Getting more women to be a part of FOSS

The FOSS statistic of male vs female contributors is really shocking and for absolutely no definite reason should this be so. Wouldn't it be fair for all and a great thing to happen if the ratio could be brought close to 50-50? Why so less number of female contributors in FOSS? What are they scared about?
Culture 2013-01-20 07:12:07 +0000
Priyanka Nag

* Git Going with Github

Git is hard. There's no way around that. But it's also incredibly powerful. Github is not all of git. It's not even most of git. But it's (mostly!) friendly, and getting a handle on it opens up worlds of possibilities, from contributing to projects to saving your own work. And it's a great stepping-stone if you want to go on and learn more git.
Cooking 2013-03-08 20:07:48 +0000
Noirin Plunkett

* Hacking Conference Tshirts

Know how you get all those great free tshirts at conferences? Don't you hate how they never seem to fit your feminine figure? Or worse yet, all that's left is sizes that are too big or too small! This talk will show easy modifications and alternative uses for those awesome conference tshirts!
Hacks 2013-02-08 17:30:25 +0000
Augustina Blair

* How to (Almost) Kill a Successful Project and then Bring It Back to Life: Lessons Learned from the Xen Project

In the decade the Xen Project has been in existence, it has seen great success. It also almost collapsed because of certain community and business decisions. We will deliver lessons learned so that other projects can avoid these pitfalls.
Culture 2013-03-09 21:18:19 +0000
Russell Pavlicek

* Lessons from 90k lines of JavaScript

A Single Page Application with 90 thousand lines of client-side JavaScript has a lot to teach us about the present and future of web development
Chemistry 2013-03-06 19:11:22 +0000
Joe Eames

* My experience of Working with Wikimedia Foundation

I am an intern of OPW, doing my internship under Wikimedia Foundation. My talk will be about the work I have been doing as an intern in Wikimedia which is not only interesting and challenging in itself, but could also help other people understand what is there that can be done to make all the Wikipedias more user-friendly for developers as well as editors.
Cooking 2013-03-08 19:13:30 +0000
Priyanka Nag

* Noise detected using arduino

Getting Started with Arduino using Linux, controling LEDs and sense.
Hacks 2013-02-27 20:24:03 +0000
Julita Inca

* Opposing Authority in Open Source

In this talk I'll showcase insights we can garner from left wing anti-establishment movements such as community radio stations, unions and cooperatives and how you can use those techniques to grow, scale and manage open source communities, while still dismantling the authority.
Culture 2013-03-08 22:08:57 +0000
Francesca Krihely

* The Apache Way

The Apache Software Foundation is likely the most successful Open Source community out there. In this session, Jim will describe the basic tenets of how Apache projects work: The Apache Way
Culture 2013-03-09 16:04:56 +0000
Jim Jagielski

* The Spock Guide To Think Out of The Vagrant Box

This session will discuss how a developer, administrator(operator) or both, can take advantage from Vagrant and how it helps in modern days multi­environments server provisioning.
Cooking 2013-03-09 10:10:16 +0000
Errazudin Ishak

* What Hath Perl Wrought?

When was the last time you looked at some Perl code? Was it readable? Was it like an archeological expedition, traveling back in time to 1994? Modern Perl is very different from the Perl of our ancestors, and if you've been away for a while, the tools that are available now will blow your mind.
Chemistry 2013-02-19 19:29:48 +0000
Mike Friedman

* Write, Debug And Tests Apps for FirefoxOS

During this talk Schalk will go over all the bits and pieces you need, and have access to, to not only write apps but, also effectively debug and test your apps before submitting them to the Marketplace or serving them up directly from your own site.
Hacks 2013-01-24 22:44:48 +0000
Schalk Neethling

* Zero to root in 12 months: Training and Utilizing Student Administrators in Higher Education

In this session you will learn how the Computer Action Team teaches the next generation of system administrators.
Culture 2013-02-12 22:50:14 +0000
William Van Hevelingen, Spencer Krum

Open Source Bridge 2010

Favorite sessions for this user

* Activity Streams, Socialism, and the Future of Open Source

It may seem obvious to some, but the socialist imagery that Mozilla uses isn't accidental. Nor is the grounding of Activity Streams in socialist theory. What do these things have to do with open source an its future? A lot, and I'll paint a picture to tell you how it should play out.
Chemistry
Chris Messina

* Connecting to Web Services on Android

This presentation will show how to connect to REST-based web services from an Android application. We'll discuss HTTP programming as well as XML and JSON libraries. This presentation will include a live demo of an Android application.
Cooking
Sean Sullivan

* CouchApp Evently Guided Hack with CouchDB

Learn to hack Evently jQuery CouchApps -- p2p web applications that can be deployed anywhere there's a CouchDB.
Hacks
J Chris Anderson

* Fixing SSL security: Supplementing the certificate authority model

The most common way of using SSL/TLS encryption relies on a public-key infrastructure that puts near-absolute trust in a large number of entities around the world, any one of which could accidentally or deliberately empower anyone to impersonate any site or service and spy on all of our communications. We've seen that these certificate authorities can make mistakes. We need new mechanisms to meaningfully double-check that they're doing the right thing.
Hacks
Seth Schoen

* Non-visual location-based augmented reality using GPS data

Augmented Reality and Geolocation have been hot topics this year, but there has often been a confusion between aesthetics vs. practicality, and fantasy vs. reality. This presentation will highlight the advantages and disadvantages of visual and non-visual augmented reality. We'll tell stories from our experiences building location-aware social networks with custom proximity notification.
Hacks
Aaron Parecki, Amber Case

* Practical Facebook stalking with Open Source tools

Facebook are full of juicy information about your friends and strangers alike! Learn how to use some simple open source tools and techniques to learn more about them.
Hacks
Paul Fenwick

* Unlikely tools for pair programming

Co-conspirators Jamey Sharp and Josh Triplett get up to a lot of miscellaneous hacking mischief together. Much of this hacking occurs while staring at the same screen, and tag-teaming the keyboard. Sometimes this happens with the two of them in different places. We'll demo our favorite tools and invite audience contributions to the discussion.
Cooking
Jamey Sharp, Josh Triplett

* Why the Sysadmin Hates Your Software

You've worked really hard on your software. It's stable and has lots of nice features and users love it. But your sysadmin hates it and complains about how hard it is to install, configure, and manage. What's up with that?
Chemistry
Steve VanDevender

Favorite proposals for this user

* "Thoughtcrime Experiments": CC/FLOSS Lessons From A DIY Sci-Fi Anthology

Last year, two FLOSS enthusiasts edited a Creative Commons-licensed anthology of original fantasy and science fiction stories and art. We did it to give back, to give readers more choices, and because documenting and sharing are in our blood. Here's how we published a great anthology, why, and how you can do it too.
Culture 2010-03-23 17:48:46 +0000
Sumana Harihareswara

* Code Happier With The Cycle: Code, Test, Fail, Diff, Fix, Pass, Commit, Repeat

If I could convince developers of one thing it would be this: Writing tests and using version control together during development is the simplest way to improve your life. So I will.
Cooking 2010-03-26 01:12:49 +0000
Michael Schwern

* Debt-Free: Technical Debt In Open Source Projects

Ship or fix? This choice presents itself to open source projects every day, and the consequences can be considerable. Learn how to control this "technical debt" in open source projects.
Cooking 2010-03-15 14:30:18 +0000
Brandon Savage

* GeoDjango

Want to build that kick ass geo-site? Use Django!
Cooking 2010-03-26 00:10:52 +0000
Chris Pitzer

* Geohacking: 2010 Edition

Here's a laundry list of tips, tricks, and hacks you can do with geolocation on the Web today ranging from the mundane to the insane. From viewing multiple datasets on a map to integrating GPS data into a video feed for simultaneous position tracking, you're bound to learn something to improve your stalking... er, I mean build better map-savvy apps.
Hacks 2010-03-25 19:04:19 +0000
Jason Mauer

* Git (Mostly) For Drupal

A crash course in git with a slant towards the special techniques needed by Drupal projects. Other developers will also find it useful.
Cooking 2010-03-26 01:31:46 +0000
Michael Schwern

* Maaaakin' Copies: How to bootstrap your product strategy using Drupal

As a software developer, do you ever get the feeling that problems solved for one client might also be used benefit a whole industry sector? Here's how to use Drupal to stop with all the wheel-reinvention.
Business 2010-03-25 18:42:17 +0000
Marcus Estes

* Mapping with Drupal

Learn the ins and outs of online mapping solutions with the open source Drupal framework.
Cooking 2010-03-12 17:09:23 +0000
Lev Tsypin

* PHP for professional folks

Join this session if you are interested in learning about the latest and greatest tools and techniques available to the PHP community.
Cooking 2010-02-24 22:21:13 +0000
Dustin Whittle

* Please Pirate: Intellectual Unproperty

Information is *already* free! Renounce your rights! Please Pirate is an alternative to copyright.
Culture 2010-03-17 22:12:23 +0000
Peter Fein

* Real Time Data Stream Visualization

A customer calls with a simple question, "is everyone down, or is it just us?" Your stomach turns. "Uhhh, I don't know, can I call you right back after I check a few things?!" Don't find yourself in this uncomfortable situation. We have the technology to watch our data in real time in ways that make the health of our systems immediately obvious.
Hacks 2010-03-26 04:35:46 +0000
Tim Freund

* Should there be a free software app store?

Since free software "is a matter of liberty, not price", developers and distributions are allowed to ask users to pay for free software (though most users can easily choose not to). Musicians like Radiohead have experimented with asking, but not requiring, users to pay for music (by choosing their own price, which could be $0). What would happen if we did this for free software?
Business 2010-03-26 00:53:46 +0000
Seth Schoen

* WebNumbr - Graph anything on the web

Graphs are awesome. Everyone can find graphs for stocks and gas prices, and maybe even Amazon prices if you're good. But how about your twitter list counts, P1 bug reports, server connection count, or flickr pictures per millisecond? Come see a cool tool that will revolutionize your graphing life.
Hacks 2010-02-24 21:02:56 +0000
Paul Tarjan