Scott Garman's favorites

Open Source Bridge 2011

Favorite sessions for this user

* Bitcoin 101

An introduction to the cryptocurrency system called Bitcoin. The cryptography, the economics of currency bootstrapping, and the traction its getting today.
Culture
Don Park

* Cookies are Bad for You: Improving Security on the Web

Almost every web application relies on cookies to authenticate each request after the user logs in. Cookies are vulnerable to cross-site request forgery and session hijacking. It is time to explore better, more secure alternatives that are now possible thanks to practical in-browser cryptography.
Chemistry
Jesse Hallett

* Creating Your Specific Live GNU/Linux Distribution with Debian Live Build

How to use Debian live build to create a specific live GNU/Linux distribution. It will be illustrated by these 3 live distributions: Clonezilla live, DRBL live, and GParted live, special live GNU/Linux distributions for system imaging/cloning, diskless linux, and graphical partition editor, respectively.
Cooking
Steven Shiau, Chenkai Sun, Yao-Tsung Wang, Thomas Tsai

* Designing Error Aggregation Systems

So often we’re solely focused on the performance of our production systems. When disaster strikes, your team needs to know when error conditions begin, where they’re coming from, frequency, and an indication of the last time they occurred. Parsing logs isn’t fast enough, and email can’t keep up or preserve metadata.
Cooking
Gavin McQuillan

* Diary of an Open Source Sysadmin Entrepreur

Half the story of the building of Puppet Labs and half instruction on how to build your own company, Luke Kanies, the founder of Puppet and Puppet Labs, will tell how he built his company and product and how you can, too.
Business
Luke Kanies

* Improving Estimates for Web Projects

How many times have you received an email or phone call from a potential client who describes their project in a few sentences and expects a formal proposal the next day? This session will address this seemingly impossible task by going over the method we have created at OpenSourcery to estimate web projects. This method has helped us work with clients to prioritize functionality, set realistic schedules, and has improved our ability to close sales.
Business
Alex Kroman

* OSWALD: Lessons from and for the Open Hardware Movement

Envisioned as a cutting-edge computing platform that would encourage students to tinker with all the latest developments in the mobile space without fear of breaking their own gadgets, the initial version of the OSWALD project out of OSU failed in several key areas. In this talk, Tim will explore lessons learned from OSWALD and how they can help the open hardware and open education communities.
Chemistry
Tim Harder

* Previously Untitled Meditation on the Zen of Python

In a language that strongly enforces a formatting style on the programmer, keeping it "pythonic" is only the tip of what makes python a wonderful, but confusing language. See what all the fuss is about in this introduction to the styles and nuances of the Python programming language and the tools you should be using when writing it.
Chemistry
Dan Colish

* Seven Habits Of Highly Obnoxious Trolls

Developing more effective habits isn't just for the good guys. We'll discuss seven methodologies that make trolls more effective---and tell you what you can do about it.
Culture
Bart Massey, Selena Deckelmann, Duke Leto

* Transit Appliances

Disruptively low-cost real-time transit displays
Culture
Chris Smith

* Turning Mediocre Products Into Awesome Products

A holistic approach to design for people through sketching, product blueprints, and team overlap (used by Apple and others).
Business
Jeremy Britton

Open Source Bridge 2010

Favorite sessions for this user

* Being a Catalyst in Communities - The science behind the open source way

How does Red Hat have wild success with Fedora and other FLOSS projects? By following a method firmly rooted in humanism, practice, and science. Learn in this session how to be an effective catalyst in communities of users, contributors, and businesses.
Culture
Karsten Wade

* Creating Embedded Linux Products with OpenEmbedded

Learn about the current state of embedded Linux distributions and advantages of the OpenEmbedded framework for developing Linux-based products.
Cooking
Scott Garman

* Free Speech, Free Software Across the World

How does free software help defend free speech in repressive regimes? Danny O'Brien will draw from the records of the Committee to Protect Journalists to explore how open source can help those at the cutting edge of free expression.
Culture
Danny O'Brien

* iizip: Hacking together your own Dropbox

Dropbox, the leader in online storage and synchronization, is good, but not good enough. Find out how you can hack together your own equivalent that's more flexible, secure and convenient.
Hacks
Ben Dechrau

* Organizing user groups, a panel discussion

User groups are a vital part of the open source community. Learn more about how to start a group, keep it going, and make an existing group better from a panel of experienced user group organizers.
Culture
Igal Koshevoy, Jesse Hallett, Eric Wilhelm, Christie Koehler, gabrielle roth, Audrey Eschright, Sam Keen

* Puppet for Beginners

Puppet is a powerful configuration management tool that makes life easier for people managing systems and applications. This tutorial gives you an in-depth and hands-on introduction to Puppet that is ideal for beginners to Puppet and configuration management.
Cooking
Teyo Tyree

* SuperSpeed me: USB 3.0 Open Source Support

USB 3.0 promises a 10x speedup and better power management than USB 2.0. But how do these devices actually work? Is there open source support for them? Come learn about these fast new devices that are finally hitting the market.
Chemistry
Sarah Sharp

* The Return of Command-Line Kung Fu

A follow-on to last year's highly popular presentation, Hal Pomeranz returns with another super-size helping of command-line madness!
Cooking
Hal Pomeranz

* The Rise of Hacker Spaces

Leigh will be discussing hacker spaces, and the culture of DIY spaces for making things around the world.
Culture
Leigh Honeywell

* Your Internets are Leaking

Using your computer on a public network is like having a conversation on a city bus: people you don't know can hear everything you say. They'll probably be polite and ignore you, but you still might not want to shout out your credit card number. Yet this is what your computer does. All the time. And you don't know it.
Cooking
Reid Beels, Michael Schwern