Eric Wilhelm's favorites

Open Source Bridge 2013

Favorite sessions for this user

* Cool Features of the Z Shell (zsh)

Z Shell is a UNIX shell with a bunch of cool features. Learn about installing and configuring zsh with some of my favorite features.
Cooking
Michael Pigg

* debugging without borders

Debuggers are great when you have intimate access to your codebase, server, and network. Sometimes, all you have is a web browser and some intuition, and you still have a problem to solve. What then?
Cooking
chris mccraw

* Designgineering

Open source software engineering and user interface design got off on the wrong foot. Sadly it’s holding our projects back from reaching their full potential. Let’s talk about how we can bring these seemingly incompatible disciplines together in perfect harmony by simply learning each other’s craft, and how to get started doing so. Whether you are an engineer or a designer you will learn where to get started and how to have fun doing it.
Culture
Trevor Parscal

* Dirty Tricks of Computer Hardware: What You Don't Know Will (Probably Not) Kill You

Ever wonder what you don't know about how your computer hardware really works? Do you tire of lying to your relatives that "gremlins" are the cause of intermittent data loss and blue screens, and not just a car from the 1970s? Let's take a journey into the wonderful world of wonky hardware and find out what can be done about it!
Chemistry
Darrick Wong

* Hacking social software with pump.io

pump.io is a platform for people who love writing social software and hate ever-changing terms of service. It's an Open Source, federated social network that works! And it's fun, too.
Chemistry
Evan Prodromou

* Hacking your Meatware: exercises you can do at your desk

You will learn about risks to your neck, shoulders, hips and core from sitting at a keyboard for hours at a time. Learn a quick 6-breath sun salutation, simple stretches, the need for regular movement. Discuss sitting, standing, walking, reclining. Simple, incremental, safe, easy.
Hacks
Kurt Sussman

* How My Kids Are Learning to Program By Talking

My children have patiently tolerated a number of teach-STEM-quick schemes their dad has brought home. They've taught robots to dance, created simple animations using Scratch, and, quite frankly, made a lot of poop jokes. What's missing from these programming tools was storytelling. The ones we tried focused either on easy interactivity or expressive power. If only there were a way to combine the two... oh, wait, there was—46 years ago!
Culture
Ian Dees

* How to multiply small integers while <del>Markus</del> human

Thank you! I'm glad someone read the description of this talk on line and remembered to answer Aardvark -- if you hadn't done that, the excerpt wouldn't have actually been part of the talk, and the very fabric of reality could have been threatened!
Chemistry
Markus Roberts

* Human Interfaces for Geeks

As technical professionals we excel at understanding protocols, standards, file-formats, and APIs. Whenever there is a doubt as to the correct way to do things, one merely needs to read the fine manual or source code. Unfortunately the reference manual for humans was lost a long time ago, and the source code is poorly documented. We've been struggling with inter-human communication ever since. Paul Fenwick will present his findings at reverse-engineering the human communication protocol.
Culture
Paul Fenwick

* It's OK to be Average

Open Source communities are often full of "the one who invented ___" people. They've written RFCs, gotten patents, published software that's already installed on every computer you'll ever buy. It can be kind of intimidating. But there's room for more than that--and welcoming more people can improve your project exponentially!
Culture
Noirin Plunkett

* Lessons From X

Lessons I've learned from 25 years of participation in perhaps the longest-running end-user-facing Open Source project.
Culture
Bart Massey

* Leveling up in DevOps: the Art of Bad Shell Scripts

What are the core differences in a DevOps intern, a beginner DevOpsian, and a senior DevOpsian?
Culture
Emily Slocombe

* Literate Programming for the 21st Century

Knuth advocated writing programs for people, not computers. How does crafting code with literate programming play with quick iterative development? Example heavy session using org-mode's Babel project and progrmming languages with succinct syntax, like Scala and Clojure.
Cooking
Howard Abrams

* Low-Friction Personal Data Collection

Have you ever wanted to track your movements, sleep, what you eat, who you spend time with, and all sorts of other personal data? In this talk I'll describe the tools I've been able to successfully use to track aspects of my life.
Cooking
Aaron Parecki

* Mod your Android

Take control of your hardware by installing an open build of Android. Learn about what is involved in installing a third-party OS on your phone or tablet. Bring your own device to hack on in a supportive environment.
Cooking
Jesse Hallett

* More Code, More Problems

Some people will tell you that you need a large, full-stack framework to do web development The Right Way. These people are wrong.
Cooking
Edward Finkler

* Negotiation: Because You're Worth It

There's only one person who wins when you don't negotiate, and it's not you. But, as any logician will tell you, that doesn't tell us about what happens when you do negotiate. I'm here to help!
Business
Noirin Plunkett

* No, I Won't Contribute to Your Open Source Project

The growth of the open community is inspiring. Yet despite this, most projects find it remarkably difficult to get people to contribute. Why?
Culture
VM Brasseur

* Open Sourcing Depression

In the spirit of open source, I'd like to shine a spotlight on depression. Not because it's easy, but because it's important. Mental illness affects many of us, but the stigma attached to it dissuades most people from talking about it openly. That's not how we make progress. With this talk, I want to do my part.
Culture
Edward Finkler

* Pro Bash Development; Way Beyond Shell Scripting

All Unix/Linux users know a little shell scripting, even if they're unaware of it. Pipes, for example, are a part of the Bash/sh language. Bash/sh, i.e. shell scripting, is usually treated as just that: shell scripting. But if you're crazy enough, you can develop full-blown profession, modular, and tested (yes, tested!) programs in Bash. It takes a little finesse, but I'll show you how, and you just might think twice about using Bash--really using it--in the future.
Hacks
Daniel Nichter

* Remote Pair Programming

Remote Pair Programming: my setup, some advice, and a live demo^H^H stress test
Cooking
Sam Livingston-Gray

* Rust: A Friendly Introduction

Conventional wisdom says that writing high-performance code means working without the safety net of credible compile-time safety checks. Mozilla Research (a community of researchers, engineers, and volunteers) is trying to prove that conventional wisdom wrong by building Rust, a new systems programming language. Rust takes advantage of well-understood programming language technology to combine aggressive compile-time error checking with the high degree of direct control over the machine necessary to write efficient systems programs. By way of examples, I'll teach you how to use Rust to write fast and trustworthy code.
Cooking
Tim Chevalier

* Shall We Play A Game?

In just 1.5 hours, I will help you craft a computer game AI that will consistently beat you and your friends.
Chemistry
Bart Massey

* Simple Questions Should Have Simple Answers

What happens when a project begins to embrace the philosophy that simple questions should have simple answers? Q: Simple to whom? A: Simple to the person asking the question. "Simple questions should have simple answers" has given me a lot of design clarity in my projects. I hope to convince you of its beneficial effects.
Culture
Michael Schwern

* Teaching Robots to See With Javascript

Computer Vision, Javascript, and Flying Drones.
Hacks
Peter Braden

* The Perl Renaissance

The Perl Renaissance is in full swing. Join internationally acclaimed speaker and White Camel Award winner Paul Fenwick as we explore some of the most freakin' amazing developments in the land of Perl!
Chemistry
Paul Fenwick

* The problem with passwords on the web and what to do about it

Handling user passwords safely is hard, but replacing passwords on the web in a reasonable way is even harder. Really, this should have been in the browser all along. This is where Persona comes in.
Chemistry
François Marier

* Using Secure Boot for the powers of good

Secure Boot is a technology for limiting the files that computers will boot. Used wrongly, it restricts user freedom and turns computers into appliances. How can we use it for real improvements in security without losing the ideals of general purpose computing?
Chemistry
Matthew Garrett

* What Is Async, How Does It Work, And When Should I Use It?

"Asynchronous" or "non-blocking" frameworks like Tornado and Node.js are in fashion, but most programmers still don't have a rigorous understanding of what's meant by asynchronous, how these frameworks function, and when they're appropriate to use. I'll give a detailed tour of Tornado's event loop and show exactly how it works, and under what circumstances it's superior to a traditional multithreaded web server. You'll learn how to write the most efficient servers for modern apps with very large numbers of concurrent connections.
Chemistry
A. Jesse Jiryu Davis

Favorite proposals for this user

* A Geek's Guide to Race Walking

"It's like the gods descending from Mt. Olympus!" Okay, so your reaction to seeing race walkers might not be as dramatic as Hal's on "Malcolm in the Middle." But from the unconventional gait to the plethora of statistics, there's plenty about this sport to delight geeks. In this session, we'll tell you all about it.
Culture 2013-02-27 19:05:07 +0000
Carmen Jackinsky, Ian Dees

* A Year with Mojolicious, the Perl Web Framework

Mojolicious is a relatively new web framework written in Perl, but I've been using it for a year to power a REST API, two web apps, and a website. In this talk I introduce Mojo and discuss its fun and not so fun parts, particularly in view of using it as the sole backend for a real SaaS-based, PaaS-deployed business. Join this talk and learn about Mojolicious--a fun, new Perl web framework--from someone who's spent a year in the field with it.
Cooking 2013-03-09 01:37:51 +0000
Daniel Nichter

* Autosustainable Services: Open Source for SaaS

Software has open source. Software as a Service has no equivalent. This is holding the web back.
Business 2013-03-23 22:37:57 +0000
Jeff Lindsay

* Burning the Garden Wall: Usable Content Security for the Web

Want to build secure and powerful applications inside your favorite web communities? Learn about application-injection, a new augmented browsing method built into the Privly application stack.
Chemistry 2013-03-09 21:53:00 +0000
Sean McGregor

* Conference Presentation Mind Control

Have you been at a talk which sounded great on paper, but was lackluster in delivery? Have you discovered that some presenters can seem to make *anything* interesting? Do you want to know how to hack audiences to convince them that your talk is *freakin' amazing* even though it's content-challenged? Want to use your conference presentation skills to kickstart your career in world domination? BYO tinfoil hat.
Hacks 2013-03-10 05:06:32 +0000
Paul Fenwick

* Deploy continuously? Yes please! But how?

How do you go from deploying once a week to once an hour or more? Culture is the biggest barrier. What did New Relic do to make this work?
Culture 2013-02-09 00:26:31 +0000
Brent Miller

* Digital Nomad: How to stay connected anywhere in the world

For some of us staying connected to the internet is an imperative, and while traveling to foreign lands it can sometimes be difficult to remain connected. Let me share with you some of the techniques that I've discovered for remaining connected while abroad.
Cooking 2013-03-10 04:48:51 +0000
Benjamin Kero

* Do you wish your content management system were as complex as your code? Wish no more.

What happens when you have requirements for a CMS that don’t quite fit any off-the-shelf solutions you can find, so you let your developers run wild with the specs?
Hacks 2013-03-11 20:21:26 +0000
Laurie Kemmerer, Dave Miller, Ravi Gadad

* Freedom or Swag? -- OLD MAN YELLS AT CLOUD

This is why we can't have nice things, peace, or privacy: When closed software or services are offered for free or cheap and found to be "good enough", the market creates barriers to innovation and freedom. Surrendering freedom is convenient and easy, keeping it requires ongoing vigilance. Why would a business not give its customers what they want?
Business 2013-03-24 06:55:58 +0000
Eric Wilhelm

* Getting Faster: 5 People Who Sped Up Our World

Everywhere we look our world is speeding up. We have "fast food" and "speed dating". In technology we talk of "sprints", and "continuous deployment". But the search for speed is not a new one and has been going on for centuries. Spanning 300 years we'll discuss 5 people who have spent their lives making things faster and learn how we can apply these concepts to the work we're doing today.
Culture 2013-03-23 18:56:20 +0000
Alex Kroman

* Hack Your Health With Open Source Tools

The DIY Health Manifesto is an empowerment manual to your own wellness minus the fear mongering and red tape of the American health care establishment. Let's examine the many ways we can measure, control and improve our own health, right here and now, using open source tools and a host of other accessible methods.
Culture 2013-03-21 22:47:47 +0000
Domenika Radonich Leto

* Highly Functional Programming (with a Semblance of Reason)

Functional programming is procedural programming without the imperative. Wolf eats the lambda.
Chemistry 2013-03-23 22:41:25 +0000
Eric Wilhelm

* Janus wasn’t a bad guy: Solving real problems using a key-value store inside a relational database.

We demonstrate how we used hstore inside a Postgres database to elegantly solve the problem of generating solid business-intelligence from the dregs of emailed PDF and Excel files.
Chemistry 2013-03-11 20:18:46 +0000
Laurie Kemmerer, Dave Miller, Ravi Gadad

* Lessons from 90k lines of JavaScript

A Single Page Application with 90 thousand lines of client-side JavaScript has a lot to teach us about the present and future of web development
Chemistry 2013-03-06 19:11:22 +0000
Joe Eames

* Opposing Authority in Open Source

In this talk I'll showcase insights we can garner from left wing anti-establishment movements such as community radio stations, unions and cooperatives and how you can use those techniques to grow, scale and manage open source communities, while still dismantling the authority.
Culture 2013-03-08 22:08:57 +0000
Francesca Krihely

* Pricing: Uncensored

Pricing is an issue with which even non-profits need to wrestle. It's a necessity for a healthy, growing business. There is no shame in pricing, nor in understanding its principles and how to do it correctly, respecting everyone's needs and boundaries.
Business 2013-02-05 19:48:19 +0000
VM Brasseur

* Scientific Computing With Perl

Perl is use widely by scientists and engineers to solve various scientific computing problems, including linear algebra, differential equations and various kinds of minimization problems. In this talk, we will show how to solve various common problems with CPAN modules along with suggestions for best practices. This allows rapid development while avoiding the need to manage memory.
Cooking 2013-03-24 03:49:29 +0000
Duke Leto

* Server Sky - Data Centers in Orbit, Internet for the Planet

Can Portland hackers bring internet to the developing world, solve the energy crisis, heal the planet, conquer the solar system, make history, and have a lot of fun doing so?
Chemistry 2013-03-21 23:27:58 +0000
Keith Lofstrom

* Survey of Percona Toolkit: Command-line Tools for MySQL

Percona Toolkit is a collection of more then 30 command-line tools for MySQL that automate a variety of MySQL and system tasks. If you use MySQL and haven't tried Percona Toolkit, come learn about some free, widely-used and mature tools that could make your job a lot easier.
Cooking 2013-03-09 02:32:32 +0000
Daniel Nichter

* The Dream-Quest of libgit2

libgit2 is Git re-imagined as thread-safe library instead of a collection of command-line scripts, possibly written by the Elder Gods themselves. This talk will describe why that is so important and the various technologies it will enable in the near future in embedded and mobile devices.
Chemistry 2013-03-22 01:34:06 +0000
Duke Leto

* The Linux Way: Rebuilding The Unix Way for a New Era

The development of GNU/Linux has resulted in major parts of the platform evolving away from UNIX's core tenets.
Chemistry 2013-02-01 08:37:58 +0000
Andy Grover

* The reality of building an open source photo platform

Lessons learned from quitting my job to start an open source photo platform.
Business 2013-03-17 02:24:43 +0000
Jaisen Mathai

* The Social Web has become a Hostile Web and How We Start Fixing That

There's a bodega across the street from the loft where my partner and I live. To get there, I walk out the door and up to a crosswalk, there's a button that activates warning lights indicating that someone's in the crosswalk which I press, and then cross the busy street. I walk into the market, get a six pack of my favorite IPA, pay cash for it, and return home. Now, let's go shopping online! Here's a suggested list of steps for using a browser safely as given by the CTO of a security company. And this list only covers browsing, not shopping. # Uninstall client-side Java. # All browser plugins should NOT auto-run, instead configured to "click-to-play." # Install security and privacy protecting add-ons including Adblock, Disconnect, Ghostery, Collusion, and NoScript. # this list continues for several more steps... I'd also suggest installing some software that alerts you to unexpected outgoing requests your computer is making. And all of this before typing anything into the URL bar, or the search box (by the way, did you turn autocomplete off?) All of those steps are like having to put on body armor, hard hat, safety googles, and goalie pads just to cross the street to my local market. Worst of all, I have to understand the underpinnings of the web to see why I'd want to take those steps. Something's gone terribly wrong with the web.
Business 2013-03-24 00:22:42 +0000
Bill Humphries

* The Spock Guide To Think Out of The Vagrant Box

This session will discuss how a developer, administrator(operator) or both, can take advantage from Vagrant and how it helps in modern days multi­environments server provisioning.
Cooking 2013-03-09 10:10:16 +0000
Errazudin Ishak

* Thinking inside the box: Using Things of the Internet to monitor the Internet of Things.

Why use closed source or closed platform tools to monitor the "Internet of Things" when the sysadmin community has been using open source monitoring tools for years?
Cooking 2013-03-24 04:29:14 +0000
Donald Delmar Davis

* VoteFair ranking and other fair vote-counting methods

Open-source software is available to bring surveys, rankings, ratings, polls, and organizational elections into the digital era. Yet far too often websites and organizations use voting methods that are no better than the single-mark ballots we use in governmental elections. Alas, when innovative developers take the DIY approach, the results are usually disastrous.
Chemistry 2013-02-28 19:14:40 +0000
Richard Fobes

* What Hath Perl Wrought?

When was the last time you looked at some Perl code? Was it readable? Was it like an archeological expedition, traveling back in time to 1994? Modern Perl is very different from the Perl of our ancestors, and if you've been away for a while, the tools that are available now will blow your mind.
Chemistry 2013-02-19 19:29:48 +0000
Mike Friedman

* What Hath Von Neumann Wrought?

I've sub-titled this presentation "skeptical musings of a reluctant cyborg." I'm mostly going to talk about computational journalism, but don't be surprised if some science fiction finds its way into the discussion.
Culture 2013-03-24 03:38:55 +0000
M. Edward (Ed) Borasky

Open Source Bridge 2010

Favorite sessions for this user

* Efficient Multi-core Application Architectures

This session examines common application architectures in regards to threading and I/O handling. Various threading models are described and weighed, explaining the pros and cons of each. For I/O, topics such as the the c10k problem and buffering are discussed with solutions. A C++ framework is introduced as an example, but the concepts are applicable to other languages as well.
Chemistry
Eric Day

* Hair and Yak Again -- A Hacker's Tale

API design, parallelism, automated testing, parallel automated testing, deployment, build tools, meta programming, GUI design and construction, hardware interfaces, network protocols, databases, change tracking, file formats, and why simple software becomes an epic journey.
Chemistry
Eric Wilhelm

* Practical Facebook stalking with Open Source tools

Facebook are full of juicy information about your friends and strangers alike! Learn how to use some simple open source tools and techniques to learn more about them.
Hacks
Paul Fenwick

* Relational vs. Non-Relational

What kind of database do you need? Thanks to new database projects like CouchDB, TokyoCabinet, Solr and others, there are more non-relational database options available than ever for developers. Yet good information on how to choose what kind of database you need is still scarce. We'll cure that in this talk.
Cooking
Josh Berkus

* SuperSpeed me: USB 3.0 Open Source Support

USB 3.0 promises a 10x speedup and better power management than USB 2.0. But how do these devices actually work? Is there open source support for them? Come learn about these fast new devices that are finally hitting the market.
Chemistry
Sarah Sharp

* Teach your class to fish, and they'll have food for a lifetime.

You have so much you want to teach, how do you structure it so that your training course is both interesting and challenging? How much theory can you squeeze into an hour before your attendees have forgotten where you started? How do you structure your course to account for classes which move slower or faster than average? This talk will cover all of these answers and more.
Business
Jacinta Richardson

* The $2 computer: ultraconstrained devices do your bidding

"Do you watch television? Is your furnace loud? Do you have $2?" My 7-year-old's marketing suggestions aside, building custom gadgets to improve your life is remarkably simple, and I'll prove it by building something on stage that you can duplicate at home.
Hacks
David Hollingsworth

* Unlikely tools for pair programming

Co-conspirators Jamey Sharp and Josh Triplett get up to a lot of miscellaneous hacking mischief together. Much of this hacking occurs while staring at the same screen, and tag-teaming the keyboard. Sometimes this happens with the two of them in different places. We'll demo our favorite tools and invite audience contributions to the discussion.
Cooking
Jamey Sharp, Josh Triplett

* Why the Sysadmin Hates Your Software

You've worked really hard on your software. It's stable and has lots of nice features and users love it. But your sysadmin hates it and complains about how hard it is to install, configure, and manage. What's up with that?
Chemistry
Steve VanDevender

* Your Internets are Leaking

Using your computer on a public network is like having a conversation on a city bus: people you don't know can hear everything you say. They'll probably be polite and ignore you, but you still might not want to shout out your credit card number. Yet this is what your computer does. All the time. And you don't know it.
Cooking
Reid Beels, Michael Schwern

Favorite proposals for this user

* On predicting predictors: hacking archive formats for fun and prophecy

We aim to inform you about the archive formats you use every day. We will include an in-depth look at the tar, ar, cpio, gzip, bzip2, and deb formats, as well as the internals of the Git object store. Armed with this information, we will show you a practical application: removing the redundancy between files in version control and distributions of source and binaries.
Chemistry 2010-02-20 09:54:33 +0000
Jamey Sharp, Josh Triplett