Amye Scavarda's favorites

Open Source Bridge 2013

Favorite sessions for this user

* Leveling up in DevOps: the Art of Bad Shell Scripts

What are the core differences in a DevOps intern, a beginner DevOpsian, and a senior DevOpsian?
Culture
Emily Slocombe

Open Source Bridge 2010

Favorite sessions for this user

* Open Source Rockets

PSAS is a student aerospace engineering project at Portland State University. We're building ultra-low-cost, open hardware and open source rockets that feature perhaps the most sophisticated amateur rocket avionics systems out there today.
Hacks
Nathan Bergey, Andrew Greenberg

* Activity Streams, Socialism, and the Future of Open Source

It may seem obvious to some, but the socialist imagery that Mozilla uses isn't accidental. Nor is the grounding of Activity Streams in socialist theory. What do these things have to do with open source an its future? A lot, and I'll paint a picture to tell you how it should play out.
Chemistry
Chris Messina

* Agile User Experience Design

Agile processes can be very successful for both clients and developers, but the rapid pace and the lack of detailed long-term plans can make it difficult to design and build high quality user experiences. We'll talk about good ways to do that.
Cooking
Randall Hansen

* Best Practices for Wiki Adoption

Wikis are easy as pie to install, edit, and even to develop. The real challenge they present is in bringing together the right people in the right way to make things happen. There are ways to tackle that challenge that can give your open source community a fighting chance.
Cooking
Steven Walling, Ted Ernst

* Free Content for Good: Producing 30 Hour Day

30 Hour Day was the first web-based live streaming telethon of its kind, designed to raise money for local charities in Portland and beyond. In this presentation, I'll share my "eureka moment" when I realized that 30 Hour Day could be the lightening rod for smaller charities in local communities around the world to use our content to raise money and awareness. We'll also have a preview of the next 30 Hour Day (July 2nd & 3rd at Pioneer Courthouse Square) and how you can get involved!
Culture
doc normal

* Functional Requirements: Thinking Like A Pirate

Creating functional requirements as a part of the planning process is like creating a treasure map. You want to get compensated for the value your cool built-with-open-source-thing is providing to your clients. Your clients want it to work better than what they originally had in mind. If you do the work upfront, you'll know when you've hit the X marks the spot.
Business
Amye Scavarda, Bill Fitzgerald

* Give a Great Tech Talk

Why do so many technical presentations suck? Make sure that yours doesn't. Josh Berkus and Ian Dees will show you how to share your ideas with your audience by speaking effectively and (when the situation warrants it) showing your code.
Culture
Josh Berkus, Ian Dees

* HipHop for PHP

HipHop transforms PHP source code into highly optimised C++ and then compiles it using g++. It allows developers to continue writing complex logical directly with PHP but leverages the speed benefits of using C++. Currently, HipHop powers the majority of Facebook servers, making this more than just a theoretical exercise. This session will cover how HipHop works, how to setup HipHop and the small changes that may be required to applications to allow it to work with both PHP and HipHop.
Chemistry
Haiping Zhao

* How To Report A Bug

Bug reports drive Open Source, but too often it's a hostile experience. As a user, how do you report a bug without being treated like you're dumping a sack of crap on the developer's doorstep? As a developer, how do you encourage users to report bugs? This is not a tutorial, but an examination of the social aspects of bug reporting.
Cooking
Michael Schwern

* How to write quality software using the magic of tests

Writing quality software is a worthwhile challenge. Learn how to harness the magic of testing to create better software. This presentation will provide you with an overview of the different kinds of tests, show code using different testing tools, and help you decide when and how to apply these to your projects
Cooking
Igal Koshevoy

* How Two Fools Made Themselves Indispensible From Their Basement Office

Two unsuspecting university project managers became super heroes when they stumbled upon the magic of open source CMS and sold their vision to bring web design in house, thus saving the university tens of thousands of dollars, better meeting their students' needs for online information, creating reliable revenue streams and enabling departments to more efficiently do their business.
Business
Chris Chiacchierini, Mason Bondi

* Introduction to PostgreSQL

Interested in using PostgreSQL for you next project, or migrating to it? This tutorial will go over the basics of PostgreSQL administration and database application design.
Cooking
Josh Berkus, Christophe Pettus

* Making Drupal Go Fast with Varnish and Pressflow

You've launched your new web site and it's starting to get some attention. You've tuned your database and optimized your HTTP daemon, but what if it's not enough to keep up with all the hits you're getting? We'd like to introduce you to your two new best friends: Varnish and Pressflow.
Cooking
Greg Lund-Chaix, Rudy Grigar

* Moonlighting in Sunlight – How to work on independent projects and have a day job.

Best practices for employers, employees and open source projects to coexist without legal conflicts.
Business
Paula Holm Jensen, Marc Alifanz

* Non-visual location-based augmented reality using GPS data

Augmented Reality and Geolocation have been hot topics this year, but there has often been a confusion between aesthetics vs. practicality, and fantasy vs. reality. This presentation will highlight the advantages and disadvantages of visual and non-visual augmented reality. We'll tell stories from our experiences building location-aware social networks with custom proximity notification.
Hacks
Aaron Parecki, Amber Case

* Open Source and the Open Social Web

Open Source software has been instrumental in the development of every revolutionary communications technology on the Internet. The Open social Web is no different.
Chemistry
Evan Prodromou

* Puppet for Beginners

Puppet is a powerful configuration management tool that makes life easier for people managing systems and applications. This tutorial gives you an in-depth and hands-on introduction to Puppet that is ideal for beginners to Puppet and configuration management.
Cooking
Teyo Tyree

* Relational vs. Non-Relational

What kind of database do you need? Thanks to new database projects like CouchDB, TokyoCabinet, Solr and others, there are more non-relational database options available than ever for developers. Yet good information on how to choose what kind of database you need is still scarce. We'll cure that in this talk.
Cooking
Josh Berkus

* Speeding up your PHP Application

Is your Wordpress site too slow? What's this HipHop PHP thing? How do I write really fast PHP apps? Drop by to get the answers to these questions.
Hacks
Rasmus Lerdorf

* Sphinx - the ultimate tool for documenting your software project

Open source software projects can succeed or fail based on their documentation. Thanks to Sphinx, open source developers now have a "documentation framework" that provides convenient indexing and automatic syntax highlighting, integrates your documentation with your code, and can automatically generate a beautiful manual as a PDF document.
Cooking
Nate Aune

* SuperSpeed me: USB 3.0 Open Source Support

USB 3.0 promises a 10x speedup and better power management than USB 2.0. But how do these devices actually work? Is there open source support for them? Come learn about these fast new devices that are finally hitting the market.
Chemistry
Sarah Sharp

* The Fine Line Between Creepy and Fun

Social software is kind of a big deal right now. In the open-source spirit of transparency and dissection, let's talk about what makes social technology creepy, what makes it fun, and how to hack things to maximize your desired outcome.
Hacks
Audrey Eschright

* The Naive Developer's Guide to Venture Capital

What you need to know before you even think about raising venture or angel capital, presented by a Silicon Valley founder who raised $9m from top tier firms.
Business
Joyce Park

* The Open Geo Stack

Location and mapping are making a huge impact on the web and mobile. Open Source is right there. Learn the elements of the geo stack, from mapping APIs to geo databases.
Cooking
Adam DuVander

* Unlikely tools for pair programming

Co-conspirators Jamey Sharp and Josh Triplett get up to a lot of miscellaneous hacking mischief together. Much of this hacking occurs while staring at the same screen, and tag-teaming the keyboard. Sometimes this happens with the two of them in different places. We'll demo our favorite tools and invite audience contributions to the discussion.
Cooking
Jamey Sharp, Josh Triplett

* When Everything Looks Like A Nail

Markus: Nautilus? I thought you said noodle house! Matt: Wait, wait, I think I see her head!! Markus: Are you sure? Matt: Maybe It's Not Her Head...
Hacks
Markus Roberts, Matt Youell

* Why the Sysadmin Hates Your Software

You've worked really hard on your software. It's stable and has lots of nice features and users love it. But your sysadmin hates it and complains about how hard it is to install, configure, and manage. What's up with that?
Chemistry
Steve VanDevender

* X Marks the Spot: Applying OpenStreetMap to the High Seas

The United States has a treasure trove of nautical charts in digital form, including plots of shipwrecks, navigation buoys, coastal and river depths, and other fine booty. OpenStreetMap is an open source, open format collaborative project for building a free map of the world. Join this session to find out more of the marine secrets of the National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), OpenSeaMap's plans to extend OSM to the high seas, and splicing the two (and your mainbrace) together. We'll use the Geospatial Data Abstraction Library (GDAL), OGR, Python, and the OSM API.
Hacks
Liz Henry, Danny O'Brien

* You Shall Not Pass: Managing Expectations and Boundaries with Clients

Open Source is great fun, even in the area of professional services. But sometimes, you want to be able to pay the bills with your awesomeness too. One of the areas of difficulty is setting boundaries with clients, even though you really just want to write amazing stuff.
Business
Amye Scavarda, Chris Strahl

* Your Internets are Leaking

Using your computer on a public network is like having a conversation on a city bus: people you don't know can hear everything you say. They'll probably be polite and ignore you, but you still might not want to shout out your credit card number. Yet this is what your computer does. All the time. And you don't know it.
Cooking
Reid Beels, Michael Schwern

Favorite proposals for this user

* 'Open Source Business Models' and other mythical creatures

A humorous look at the taxonomy of Open Source ecosystems and the businesses that support/are supported by them based on one person's reflections and observations on a two years spent building an open source business and selling 'free'.
Business 2010-03-26 03:25:34 +0000
Andrew Clay Shafer

* 21 Rules for Software Consulting

Do you have what it takes to succeed as a software consultant? Or will you crash and burn out in an avalanche of missed deadlines, overdue bills and litiginous former clients? Learn the 21 rules and you have a much better chance of surviving, or even succeeding.
Business 2010-03-14 05:01:40 +0000
Josh Berkus

* Code Happier With The Cycle: Code, Test, Fail, Diff, Fix, Pass, Commit, Repeat

If I could convince developers of one thing it would be this: Writing tests and using version control together during development is the simplest way to improve your life. So I will.
Cooking 2010-03-26 01:12:49 +0000
Michael Schwern

* Django 102 - past the introduction

You've been through the tutorials on Django, and now you want to deploy a real site in it - and you're lost. Let's fix that.
Cooking 2010-03-26 00:06:35 +0000
Chris Pitzer

* Fiddling with Linux

A violin is an analog instrument beloved throughout the world. I started playing at the end of 2009 and will spare sharing my skills but, I will share Linux tools, scripts and hardware I use to help learn and play.
Hacks 2010-03-26 05:38:45 +0000
Brandon Philips

* GeoDjango

Want to build that kick ass geo-site? Use Django!
Cooking 2010-03-26 00:10:52 +0000
Chris Pitzer

* Git (Mostly) For Drupal

A crash course in git with a slant towards the special techniques needed by Drupal projects. Other developers will also find it useful.
Cooking 2010-03-26 01:31:46 +0000
Michael Schwern

* Help! My webapp is slow and I don't know what to do!

One of your clients has asked you to have a look at their web application and to make it faster. Where do you start? Without looking at (or changing) the source code of the application, what can you do to make it better?
Cooking 2010-03-12 04:37:54 +0000
Francois Marier

* Lessons Learned from Open Source Development

Two decades worth of lessons learned around open source development.
Culture 2010-03-25 06:56:50 +0000
Brian Aker

* Open Source Ethernet I/O Convergence in the Data Center with Open FCoE, iSCSI and Data Center Bridging as building blocks of The Cloud

That LAN port on your server just got sexy with high speed 10 Gigabit Ethernet and storage protocols providing the building blocks for data center LAN/SAN protocol convergence. We'll explore the protocol stacks, code resources and the application of these technologies in virtualized data centers. We'll also talk about the "big iron" IT vendor’s application of I/O convergence and how you as an open source developer can contribute.
Chemistry 2010-03-26 06:01:19 +0000
doc normal

* REPENT!!! FOR THE END OF THE UNIX EPOCH IS NIGH!!!

SINNERS!! HEAR ME!! For too long have you lain contented and SLOTHFUL in the illusion that time is infinite! SOON the UNIX EPOCH will END and numbers will OVERFLOW their confines CLEANSING all in a flood the likes we have not seen since 1901!!! The SINS of your 32 BITS will chase your children and your children's children unless you REPENT NOW and cleanse your code of the 2038 BUG!!
Chemistry 2010-03-26 00:33:39 +0000
Michael Schwern

* The curious case of php|architect

How can a business that publishes twelve magazines, organizes two conferences and trains 2,000 developers a year in three different formats be managed in its entirety by a team of five people across two different countries? Why, through the magic of open-source software, clever hackery and a passion for great software
Business 2010-02-20 01:50:37 +0000
Marco Tabini

* Thinking Like a Programmer: Building a Programming Curriculum

Let's discuss the development of a beginning Ruby programming curriculum for the general public.
Culture 2010-02-24 05:03:04 +0000
John Metta

* Using Eduglu, a new Drupal Distro for Higher Education

Drupal's use is exploding in Higher Education. This session will introduce a new Drupal distribution designed to serve as a platform for building rich intranets for educational institutions.
Cooking 2010-03-26 05:34:40 +0000
Kyle Mathews

* Using virtualization and automation to improve your web development workflow

Large-scale web projects use sophisticated staged deployment systems, but the prospect of setting these up can be daunting. Using virtualization and automated configuration puts the benefits within easy reach even for small projects. David Brewer explains how Second Story uses Linux, VMware Server, and AutomateIt to grease the wheels of development on their museum-sector projects.
Cooking 2010-03-29 15:42:24 +0000
David Brewer

* Why the Plone CMS is a good fit for Higher Education and Research

Universities and research organizations often have very specific needs when it comes to content management systems. This talk is a study as to why Plone is often chosen as the ideal CMS due to it's scalability, extensibility and metadata handling capabilities.
Culture 2010-03-26 04:19:26 +0000
Nate Aune

* Wikipedia's Usability Initiative: Making MediaWiki (More) User-Friendly

The Wikipedia Usability Initiative is a project to transform the free encyclopedia into something that truly anyone can edit. I'll outline the progress made since 2008 and offer a sneak peek at the future of MediaWiki.
Chemistry 2010-03-30 06:59:27 +0000
Steven Walling