Devin Chalmers's favorites

Open Source Bridge 2011

Favorite sessions for this user

* A Dozen Databases in 45 Minutes

What OSS database to use is an important decision, but recently languishing in the shadow of the sexier "what framework should I use" talks - or underplayed as though the battle were only SQL v noSQL. If your understanding of data storage tops out at "Mongo is webscale" or "mysql + memcached = win" then this talk is for you.
Cooking
Eric Redmond

* Beaming Up With Alien and Lua

lua is an extension language that is used in everything from mail filters to World of Warcraft. Learn how you can script C libraries with lua and alien.
Chemistry
Brandon Philips

* Bitcoin 101

An introduction to the cryptocurrency system called Bitcoin. The cryptography, the economics of currency bootstrapping, and the traction its getting today.
Culture
Don Park

* Control Emacs with Your Beard: the All-Singing All-Dancing Intro to Hacking the Kinect

See! The Amazing Future of Human-Computer Interaction! Behold! The Awesome Power of Open-Source Libraries and Cheap Video-Game Accessories! Fake Beards!
Hacks
Devin Chalmers, Greg Borenstein

* Getting Started with FPGAs and HDLs

Lots of attention has been given to GPUs for speeding up certain types of computations. While GPUs are very well suited for vector operations, there are other things they are not so well suited for. FPGAs (Field Programmable Gate Arrays) are not used as widely yet, but they offer a much more flexible computing fabric than GPUs. You can implement a GPU in an FPGA, for example, or you could implement your own custom processor optimized for very specialized tasks. The barrier to entry can be high for FPGAs: how does a person with a software development background get started using them? And what about HDLs (Hardware Description Langauges) used to program FPGAs? What's the difference between simulation and synthesis? What kinds of tools are freely available? These are some of the questions that will be addressed in this session.
Cooking
Phil Tomson

* GraphViz: The Open-Source Body Scanner for Code, Systems, and Data

Do you generate, manage, or analyze a lot of data? Do you develop software? Do you like pretty pictures? If your answer was "yes" to zero or more of these questions, this talk is for you.
Chemistry
Matt Youell

* Growing Food with Open Source

Open source folks are naturally lazy. Anything mundane task they can automate, they will. So what does an open source developer do when faced with planning, planting, and tediously watering a garden? Automate!
Hacks
Sarah Sharp

* How 5 People with 4 Day Jobs in 3 Time Zones Enjoyed 2 Years Writing 1 Book

Hear how a distributed team tackled a big project (a book about a large open source project) in our spare time. Along the way, we encountered tools, techniques, and working styles that may be useful to you in your own career—or at least serve as a humorous warning.
Business
Ian Dees

* Intro to CouchDB

Overview of Apache CouchDB, who is using it, and how you can too.
Cooking
J Chris Anderson

* IRL: How Do Geeks Undermine Their Presentations and Conversations with Body Language

Many geeks are uncomfortable interacting IRL with clients or audiences but you don't have to be. There are some simple physical tricks to keeping an audience (of 1 or 1k) engaged and not undermining your skills and yourself.
Hacks
Sarah Novotny

* JavaScript Up and Down the Stack

From the Browser to node.js all the way to the database you can use and share your JavaScript!
Cooking
Mikeal Rogers

* Law is Code, and We're Here to Open Source It

Anyone can show how to save the world. We tell how to receive unsolicited love letters while doing it.
Culture
Robb Shecter, Lisa Hackenberger

* No More Joins

Everything you learned about database modeling is wrong. At least for document databases like CouchDB and MongoDB. Learn about these differences, the trade-offs, the use cases, and put it all in practice in a discussion about a real-life document database problem. Unlearn SQL habits and relax.
Cooking
Nuno Job, J Chris Anderson, Roger Bodamer

* Open Source GIS Desktop Smackdown

See the leading open source GIS desktop systems solve real world problems.
Chemistry
David Percy, Darrell Fuhriman, Christian Schumann-Curtis

* Parrot: State of the VM

Parrot is an ambitious and long-lived project that aims to be a VM for interoperable dynamic language implementation. We'll take a look at what Parrot's developers have been doing of late, what kind of awesome goodies we've plundered from the OSS world and where we want to go in the next year.
Chemistry
Christoph Otto

* Seven Habits Of Highly Obnoxious Trolls

Developing more effective habits isn't just for the good guys. We'll discuss seven methodologies that make trolls more effective---and tell you what you can do about it.
Culture
Bart Massey, Selena Deckelmann, Duke Leto

* Showing Kids the Source

When kids get hands on experience with the source code of a program, they get excited!
Culture
Andrew Baerg

* Snooze, the Totally RESTful Language

As you can see we get a "403 Forbidden" in response to our "POST /integer/5/increment"...can anyone tell me why? It worked when we did "PUT /variable/x/let/integer/5" followed by "POST /variable/x/increment", so why can't we do it directly?
Hacks
Markus Roberts

* The Big Data Exploratorium: Data Mining, from Patents to Memes

Learn to use simple natural language processing and graph analysis tools in Python and R to explore the structure of the dataverse. From Reddit to the USPTO to Google Books, come try some data hacks!
Cooking
Noah Pepper, Devin Chalmers

* The Open Cloud

Why be locked into a cloud vendor? Shouldn't Cloud be Open Cloud and powered by Open Source software? Open Stack is a collection of open source technologies to deliver a cloud operating system. Learn about Open Stack and how to use it to deliver your own Open Source powered clouds.
Cooking
James Turnbull, Eric Day

* Turning Mediocre Products Into Awesome Products

A holistic approach to design for people through sketching, product blueprints, and team overlap (used by Apple and others).
Business
Jeremy Britton

Favorite proposals for this user

* <Your Favorite Programming Language> Loses

Every programming language in wide use has some horrible mistakes: your favorite is no exception. We'll talk about some fundamental principles of PL design and how they play out in various real languages.
Chemistry 2011-03-14 05:26:26 +0000
Bart Massey

* Booze and Tech

A lighthearted look at how technology can help you get your drink on, and why this actually matters
Culture 2011-03-16 04:32:42 +0000
Kevin Scaldeferri

* Communicating with Perl and Arduino

Intro to working with an Arduino and your programs. The Internet of Things is here but we can spread it further.
Hacks 2011-01-19 19:52:08 +0000
Robert Blackwell

* Creepers, Zombies, and Skeletons: Minecraft and open-source

A trek through the history of Minecraft and what we can learn from its interaction with open-source communities
Culture 2011-03-18 20:20:37 +0000
Corbin Simpson

* From MongoDB to MySQL: the How and the Why

Diaspora started out on MongoDB, but after nine months of full-time development we switched to MySQL. Why? How? And what now?
Cooking 2011-04-01 05:56:56 +0000
Sarah Mei

* Geek Choir 3.0 (Long Form)

Geek Choir - The Return! (Now, even longer!)
Culture 2011-02-11 21:54:57 +0000
Michael Alan Brewer

* Geek Choir 3.0 (Short Form)

Geek Choir - The Return!
Culture 2011-02-11 21:51:53 +0000
Michael Alan Brewer

* GNOME 3 - A New Desktop Experience

GNOME 3 was released in April 2011. A presentation on the thought process in innovating a different user experience on the desktop.
Cooking 2011-02-16 06:20:07 +0000
Sriram Ramkrishna

* Helping kids read

Kids can choose their own learning path as soon as they can read. It's not hard to give them a smooth runway using this parenting hack.
Culture 2011-01-20 17:17:50 +0000
Kurt Sussman

* Inside Dalvik

Dalvik is Google's version of the Java VM for running apps on Android. This session gives an introduction to the concepts shared by Java and Dalvik, as well as how to migrate code from one to another platform.
Chemistry 2011-02-22 19:47:51 +0000
Markus Franz

* Is there Open Source Software on Other Planets?

Learn about (and get involved with) setiQuest Explorer, the first application (fully open source) that allows ordinary people to examine radio telescope signals and participate directly in the search for extraterrestrial intelligence.
Culture 2011-03-31 06:27:33 +0000
Francis Potter

* Open source, offline, custom mapping on the iPad

The MapBox team has been creating offline and mobile map browsing experiences that make it possible for users to better take advantage of geo-visualizations when working in the field. This presentation will focus specifically on the development of the MapBox iPad application, looking at the use cases that drove its development and the open source software stack that made it possible.
Cooking 2011-02-07 23:29:31 +0000
Justin Miller

* Personal Publishing: Curating a Fire hydrant down to a trickle

For years now I have consumed a large amount of feeds in Google Reader. I have also been creating my own content. I have had to build a number of tools to publish the way I want. In my talk I can talk about my system, and how others can build something like it.
Hacks 2011-01-20 06:35:43 +0000
Alex Kessinger

* Postgres! The Musical

An animated musical mini-movie in which our heroine uses open-source software to overthrow the stranglehold of the evil head of IT, and finds true love in the process.
Culture 2011-03-31 00:08:16 +0000
Melissa Hollingsworth

* Shattering Secrets with Social Media

Who works for that startup? What are they building? Who are their investors? Did he quit or get fired? Who is she dating now? Does any of it matter?
Culture 2011-02-11 18:52:36 +0000
Keith Casey

Open Source Bridge 2010

Favorite sessions for this user

* Open Source Rockets

PSAS is a student aerospace engineering project at Portland State University. We're building ultra-low-cost, open hardware and open source rockets that feature perhaps the most sophisticated amateur rocket avionics systems out there today.
Hacks
Nathan Bergey, Andrew Greenberg

* (CANCELLED) Getting Started with FPGAs and HDLs

Lots of attention has been given to GPUs for speeding up certain types of computations. While GPUs are very well suited for vector operations, there are other things they are not so well suited for. FPGAs (Field Programmable Gate Arrays) are not used as widely yet, but they offer a much more flexible computing fabric than GPUs. You can implement a GPU in an FPGA, for example, or you could implement your own custom processor optimized for very specialized tasks. The barrier to entry can be high for FPGAs: how does a person with a software development background get started using them? And what about HDLs (Hardware Description Langauges) used to program FPGAs? What's the difference between simulation and synthesis? What kinds of tools are freely available? These are some of the questions that will be addressed in this session.
Cooking
Phil Tomson

* Building Interactive Displays with Touchscreen 2.0

Touchscreen is a platform for creating interactive kiosk and dashboard displays. It powers presentations for visitors to the Open Source Lab's data center and the network operations center. Come learn how touchscreen works and how to use it for your own display screens.
Cooking
Peter Krenesky, Rob McGuire-Dale

* Copyright lawyers can Gödel

"This compression algorithm is of course very inefficient, at least when applied to a small collection of documents. But if you were to apply it to a larger collection, say, all the music ever recorded and all movies ever made, some gains may be realized...
Hacks
Markus Roberts

* CouchApp Evently Guided Hack with CouchDB

Learn to hack Evently jQuery CouchApps -- p2p web applications that can be deployed anywhere there's a CouchDB.
Hacks
J Chris Anderson

* eBooks, ePub, iPad, Kindle, o-my

Print is dead. Well, not dead yet. But it'll be stone dead in a moment.
Chemistry
Lennon Day-Reynolds

* Geek Choir

This is exactly what it looks like: We're going to make you sing. ;)
Culture
Michael Alan Brewer

* Hacking Space Exploration

From creating remote-sensing CubeSats to analyzing aerogel: how the public is hacking into open source space exploration.
Culture
Ariel Waldman

* Housetruck: Building a Victorian RV

As a "software person," I found the hard technologies of building with steel and wood made for a very different creative and hacking process. At the same time, I discovered many parallels to software development, embedded hardware, and even open-source philosophies.
Hacks
John Labovitz

* HyperCard 2010: Why Johnny Can't Code (and What We Can Do About It)

Thomas Jefferson envisioned a nation of self-sufficient citizen farmers; programmers like Alan Kay and Bill Atkinson tried to help us code as easily as we might hang a poster on the wall. What happened to the HyperCard ideal? Have we settled for consumption over creation? I will explore the question through a case study, surveying the state of citizen programming in 2010 — from CouchApps to Shoes to plain-jane HTML5+JS to HyperCard 2.4 — and try to convince all comers that realizing the dream of the citizen coder is vital to continuing the ideals of open source.
Culture
Devin Chalmers

* JIT-Compiling Domain Specific Languages

During this talk, we will survey real-world implementations of JIT-compiled embedded DSLs and their applications.
Hacks
Jeremy Voorhis

* Making Robots Accessible to Everyone

I've been looking for an affordable, flexible, easy to learn robotics platform for years that I could use to teach kids the basics of programming/electronics/robotics. Last Fall, I finally found it.
Culture
Brett Nelson, Jim Larson

* Node.js and you

Node.js is one of the most exciting things to happen to server-side development in the last few years. Here you'll find out why Node.js is a perfect fit for your next project and a better fit than existing languages for modern web development.
Cooking
Mikeal Rogers

* Non-visual location-based augmented reality using GPS data

Augmented Reality and Geolocation have been hot topics this year, but there has often been a confusion between aesthetics vs. practicality, and fantasy vs. reality. This presentation will highlight the advantages and disadvantages of visual and non-visual augmented reality. We'll tell stories from our experiences building location-aware social networks with custom proximity notification.
Hacks
Aaron Parecki, Amber Case

* Relational vs. Non-Relational

What kind of database do you need? Thanks to new database projects like CouchDB, TokyoCabinet, Solr and others, there are more non-relational database options available than ever for developers. Yet good information on how to choose what kind of database you need is still scarce. We'll cure that in this talk.
Cooking
Josh Berkus

* Serialist: lazy web-crawling in Haskell

Serialist (http://serialist.net/) provides a way to find, track and read serialized content (e.g., web comics). It's implemented entirely in Haskell and demonstrates functional web application development, crawling, scraping and distributed architecture. Serialist uses interesting graph algorithms to add and step through content lazily.
Hacks
Jamey Sharp, Josh Triplett

* The $2 computer: ultraconstrained devices do your bidding

"Do you watch television? Is your furnace loud? Do you have $2?" My 7-year-old's marketing suggestions aside, building custom gadgets to improve your life is remarkably simple, and I'll prove it by building something on stage that you can duplicate at home.
Hacks
David Hollingsworth

* The Open Geo Stack

Location and mapping are making a huge impact on the web and mobile. Open Source is right there. Learn the elements of the geo stack, from mapping APIs to geo databases.
Cooking
Adam DuVander

* The Return of Command-Line Kung Fu

A follow-on to last year's highly popular presentation, Hal Pomeranz returns with another super-size helping of command-line madness!
Cooking
Hal Pomeranz

* When Everything Looks Like A Nail

Markus: Nautilus? I thought you said noodle house! Matt: Wait, wait, I think I see her head!! Markus: Are you sure? Matt: Maybe It's Not Her Head...
Hacks
Markus Roberts, Matt Youell

Favorite proposals for this user

* "Thoughtcrime Experiments": CC/FLOSS Lessons From A DIY Sci-Fi Anthology

Last year, two FLOSS enthusiasts edited a Creative Commons-licensed anthology of original fantasy and science fiction stories and art. We did it to give back, to give readers more choices, and because documenting and sharing are in our blood. Here's how we published a great anthology, why, and how you can do it too.
Culture 2010-03-23 17:48:46 +0000
Sumana Harihareswara

* 'But It's Broken!' Advice for First-Time FOSS Project Patch Submitters

You've found a critical error in a widely-used FOSS system, you write a great fix, you submit it... and it is bounced, and you think the reason is lame. What to do? We'll guide you through the political minefield that is submitting your first patch to a FOSS project.
Culture 2010-03-30 06:44:51 +0000
Christophe Pettus, Josh Berkus

* Data Visualization For Fun and Profit

How to improve your software (and your business) using a bit of math, some Python code, and R, the world's best free statistics software.
Cooking 2010-02-22 20:53:57 +0000
Lennon Day-Reynolds

* Developing an Open Source UMPC for Higher Education

The Oregon State Wireless Active Learning Device (OSWALD) is a fully open Ultra-Mobile Personal Computer (UMPC) platform designed, maintained, and used by students. Join us while we discuss the design process, software platform, and challenges we've run into while developing an embedded Linux platform for a custom-made handheld.
Hacks 2010-03-25 21:39:05 +0000
Tim Harder, Ben Goska

* From the Ashes of MetroFi

The Personal Telco Project has been offered a portion of the wireless gear abandoned by the MetroFi muni-wifi failure. We are working on extracting the maximum public benefit from what we ultimately receive.
Hacks 2010-02-24 09:04:44 +0000
Russell Senior

* Get organized: Emacs a la org-mode

Have you ever finished a day and wondered where the time went? Need to bill customers but only have a vague idea of your actual effort? Get back on track with a heaping scoop of org-mode!
Cooking 2010-03-16 14:00:16 +0000
Brandon Philips

* Haiku: The Other FLOSS OS

Looking for an alternative to Linux or the BSDs? Let me introduce you to Haiku, an open source clone of BeOS. We'll go through how to use it and how to contribute.
Chemistry 2010-03-25 00:09:28 +0000
John Melesky

* Harnessing Java with Scala

We provide you an introduction to the Scala programming language through its powerful capabilities to integrating with Java. We will demonstrate how Scala can be an effective means of exploring Java libraries such as JAXB, HttpClient and Hibernate. We will show why Scala is our preferred harness, with capabilities beyond Java, Beanshell or Groovy.
Cooking 2010-03-22 03:19:50 +0000
Thomas Lockney, Trenton Lipscomb

* How to Teach Kids to Program Computers

Tips, tricks and a curriculum for teaching children to program computers in your spare time.
Culture 2010-03-29 05:03:46 +0000
Howard Abrams

* The new schism: SQL vs. NoSQL

RDMS showed us the one true way to organize data, yet the NoSQL movement shows us how it fails. The faithful are confused and concerned. The heretics rally boldly in the streets with torches and pitchforks, yelling something about "doesn't scale," while the defenders of orthodoxy scream about the features and safeties these strange new gods lack, and do the apostates even realize it? As the philosophical storm brews, DB admins and developers must make fateful decisions that will affect the rest of the code's life. Here they will glean the first glimpses of the knowledge they will need to make informed choices and be spared the wrath of the database gods.
Chemistry 2010-03-29 23:17:58 +0000
Melissa Hollingsworth

* Thinking Like a Programmer: Building a Programming Curriculum

Let's discuss the development of a beginning Ruby programming curriculum for the general public.
Culture 2010-02-24 05:03:04 +0000
John Metta

* Web Framework Shootout

Which web framework will rule them all? As an audience member you pick the winner! We will present an introduction to a variety of web frameworks including Rails, Django, Symfony, and Sinatra.
Cooking 2010-02-25 23:15:13 +0000
Dustin Whittle

* WebNumbr - Graph anything on the web

Graphs are awesome. Everyone can find graphs for stocks and gas prices, and maybe even Amazon prices if you're good. But how about your twitter list counts, P1 bug reports, server connection count, or flickr pictures per millisecond? Come see a cool tool that will revolutionize your graphing life.
Hacks 2010-02-24 21:02:56 +0000
Paul Tarjan

* Wikipedia's Usability Initiative: Making MediaWiki (More) User-Friendly

The Wikipedia Usability Initiative is a project to transform the free encyclopedia into something that truly anyone can edit. I'll outline the progress made since 2008 and offer a sneak peek at the future of MediaWiki.
Chemistry 2010-03-30 06:59:27 +0000
Steven Walling

* Write a Linux Device Driver: Flipping bits, blinking lights and crashing Kernels

Curious what makes your hardware tick? Itching to crash your system in a indiviualized way? Then you should try your hand at writing a device driver for Linux.
Chemistry 2010-03-26 05:31:26 +0000
Brandon Philips