Paul Fenwick's favorites

Open Source Bridge 2014

Favorite sessions for this user

* Build your own exobrain

Online services like "If This Then That" (IFTTT) are great for automating your life. However they provide limited ways for the end-user to add their own services, and often require credentials that one may normally wish to keep secret. The 'exobrain' project allows for service integration and extension on a machine *you* control.
Cooking
Paul Fenwick

* Crash Course in Tech Management

Managing is a skill which you can master just as you did programming. This session will introduce you to many of the skills and resources you’ll need to become a successful tech manager (and keep your team from wanting to string you up).
Business
VM Brasseur

* Explicit Invitations: Passion is Not Enough for True Diversity

Open Source suffers from a lack of diversity. Underrepresented populations, for systemic reasons, might never show up unless Open Source communities 'hack' themselves through explicit invitation & removing barriers to participation. Mozilla is funding two pilot studies designed to explicitly reach out to underrepresented groups in open source today. Seeking people who like to solve problems and then engaging them in a 6 week, full time accelerator program we hope to explore the question: Can we seed our communities by hacking the social/cultural/systemic issues in order to gain technical contributions from a more diverse set of minds and give to participants an experience in tech that might have long term benefits to them?
Hacks
Lukas Blakk

* Freedom, security and the cloud

Cloud hosting is cheap. Cloud hosting is easy. What compromises are you making when you deploy to the cloud, both in terms of your security and in terms of your dependency on proprietary software?
Chemistry
Matthew Garrett

* Geek Choir

A hands-on session in which we show how to increase team identity, cohesion, and collaboration via singing.
Culture
Michael Alan Brewer

* Internet Archive: More than the Wayback Machine

In this session we will: * Give you a tour of Internet Archive and its collections * Introduce you to the APIs and tools you can use to access and contribute to the Archive * Show examples of how other people and institutions are using the Archive
Chemistry
VM Brasseur, Alexis Rossi

* Intro to the IndieWeb: How Far Can We Go?

What happens when an online service you use freezes your account, loses your data, or goes out of business? Have you ever used a service by a company that suddenly went under, stranding your data? Do you own your own identity or does somebody else? What happened to the web in 2003, and how did we get where we are today? This talk will teach you how to post on your own site and optionally syndicate to other sites (POSSE), how to authenticate with your own domain (IndieAuth) and steps to take data ownership back into your own hands.
Chemistry
Amber Case

* It's Dangerous to Go Alone: Battling the Invisible Monsters in Tech

It can be hard to focus on your love of coding when you are regularly battling invisible issues like insecurity, anxiety, and lack of confidence. This talk will identify invisible issues programmers struggle with, talk about their impact, discuss personal experiences dealing with them, and share some tools useful in fighting back.
Culture
Julie Pagano

* Knitting for programmers

Yeah, you've seen us knitting during talks. I promise we're paying more attention than the people with their laptops open. Well, now learn how we do what we do... the programmer way. I'll start with the topology of individual stitches and go through geometry to design patterns, and by the end of it you'll know how to knit a sweater.
Hacks
Alex Bayley

* Mushroom Data Demystified

Mushroom Observer is a tool for logging and mapping fungus sightings. Beginners and professionals collaborate to produce a comprehensive data set, which has contributed to the burgeoning science of mycology. While this talk focuses on Mushroom Observer, it will be an overview of usefulness of open source amateur contributions to scientific research.
Culture
Lauren Hudgins

* Power Tuning Linux: A Case Study

In this talk we will do a reality-check in terms of the power consumption on off-the-shelve systems running “out of the box” Linux distributions.
Chemistry
Alexandra Yates

* Rocket Science On Github

Git isn't just for code. What about CAD files? Experimental test data? How do you manage a multidisciplinary project with git? Last year Portland State Aerospace Society, a relatively large open source rocketry project, moved all their work onto github. I'll share my experience with the switch from a few self hosted git repos to a full fledged github presence. What worked, what hasn't, github's features for non coders, and a little on the future of open science.
Culture
Nathan Bergey

* Scottish Folk Dance: If you can follow code, you can dance!

Can you follow and write code? Do you participate in the ebb and flow of open source communities? Does pivoting those skills into a social form of exercise appeal to you? If so, then Scottish folk dancing might be for you!
Culture
Darrick Wong

* Slytherin 101: How To Win Friends and Influence People

Do you wish that you were better at getting people to do what you need them to do? Do you keep getting put in charge of things and then get stuck wondering how the heck you're supposed to get things done? Do you keep getting into conflicts with other people because of stuff you've said, and you aren't entirely sure why? Fortunately, Slytherin House has you covered. Come to this talk and learn the basics of how to hack human relationships, using the tools of cunning and ambition to achieve inter-House harmony. As long as you promise not to use these techniques to support the next Dark Lord, of course.
Culture
Denise Paolucci

* Stop Crying in the Bathroom and Start Your Own Business

The tech industry has a 'diversity problem' and companies are courting women, people of color and other marginalized people as the pressure mounts to hire someone besides 24-year-old cis, straight white male programmers. However, for many marginalized people, working in startups, agencies, and large tech companies can be a miserable, demoralizing experience that literally results in crying in the bathroom. There's more to life than startups. Come hear ideas for making your own path in the tech industry, without compromising your dignity or your mental health.
Business
Kronda Adair

* Supporting communities with Gittip

There are lots of people doing good work in the world, and while there seems to be a myriad of ways to provide financial "donations", few of them provide a way to do so in a sustainable manner. We're going to look at Gittip, a freedom loving platform to provide a sustainable, predictable income to those making the world a better place.
Culture
Paul Fenwick

* The joy of volunteering with open technology and culture

Volunteering is a fun way to explore your interests and passions. In this talk, I will detail my experiences in volunteering with open projects like Wikipedia and Mozilla. I will also talk about fun ways to introduce newbies into volunteering based on my experience with conducting outreach sessions for open projects.
Culture
Netha Hussain

* The Outreach Program for Women: what works & what's next

We've mentored and interned in the Outreach Program for Women, and we know it works -- it improves the gender balance inside open source communities. We'll discuss why it works, how it builds off of Google Summer of Code, and discuss replicating it, expanding it, and looking at the next step in the recruiting and inclusion pipeline.
Cooking
Sumana Harihareswara, Liz Henry

* Utilizing open source medical systems to reach the next 33 million

There is an increase in double burden of diseases in developing countries accruing from the rise of non communicable and infectious diseases. This situation is worsened by lack of adequate financing, inadequate infrastructure for delivering health care, low health literacy and inadequate personnel. Health information systems drive the global health agenda , and huge investments are continuously being made to bridge the digital divide to improve health care delivery. 1. What are the opportunities to effectively deploy open source technologies in developing countries? 2. How do we create ownership, partnerships and collaborations that support scaling open source medical records system 3. What are the effective design thinking techniques that drive development of open source record systems
Business
judy wawira

Favorite proposals for this user

* Anonymous Social Networks - Why we need them

There is a new type of social media causing quite a disruption in the industry. It is a social media where people create posts anonymously
Culture 2014-03-26 23:14:07 +0000
A.J. Weinzettel

* Fennec, the ultimate testers toolbox

Fennec ties together several testing related modules and enhances their functionality in ways you don't get when loading them individually. Fennec makes testing easier, and more useful. Areas Fennec affects are Concurrency, State, Workflow, Tools, and Mocking.
Cooking 2014-03-24 15:26:50 +0000
Chad Granum

* Join a HOT Activation: How to Respond to a Disaster with the Humanitarian OpenStreetMap Team as a Digital Volunteer

Join a HOT Activation: Digital Volunteering for Disaster Response
Culture 2014-04-02 11:51:33 +0000
Kate Chapman

* Proposal: "I come from a Land Down Under. No, the other one. Or: Why New Zealand is a fantastic place for open sourcers"

This session is a presentation on some of the wide array of cool open source, open data, & open science things happening in New Zealand and will include discussion of functional political activism in a small parliamentary democracy, The Hobbit, mandatory minimum four-week PTO requirements, unarmed cops, no TSA, and lots of pictures of spectaculars vistas, beaches, recreational opportunities, and the basics of expatriation.
Culture 2014-04-04 02:35:38 +0000
Daniel Spector

Open Source Bridge 2013

Favorite sessions for this user

* !done - Hacking IRC Bots for Distributed Teams

When our company was acquired we needed a way to see everything that was done each day all in one place. Teams were using different methods to do this: standups, written reports, emails and meetings. Nothing stuck. Done reports introduces a simple IRC command: !done. Team members say !done and what they just did. These !dones are put into a daily report. !done becomes a part of everyday at work, not a strained task that’s easily forgotten.
Culture
Amber Case, Aaron Parecki

* "Give me money" or "join me in doing this great thing"? A workshop on asking for donations from individuals

If you care about a project or cause, but fear adding individual fundraising to your business plan, come to this long-form workshop. By the end, you will enthusiastically seek out opportunities to ask for money and know how to build a strong community of support over time.
Business
Kellie Brownell

* Balloon & Kite Mapping Workshop

Low-budget, no budget, need aerial images fast? Learn to map with balloons and kites.
Hacks
Mathew Lippincott

* Beginning Functional Programming in Scala

Have you heard about functional programming but not sure what all the fuss is about? Learn about the basic concepts of functional programming, writing functions in Scala, and the functional approach to working with collections supported by Scala's collections library. Learn about the benefits of a functional approach to programming even when you're not fully adopting a functional style. Scala is a language that allows mixing the object-oriented and functional approaches. No prior knowledge of Scala is required to enjoy this talk.
Chemistry
Michael Pigg

* Bugs, bugs, bugs!

Bugmasters from Wikimedia, Mozilla, and GNOME argue entertainingly about bug management. We shall reveal our best Bugzilla hacks as well as waxing philosophical about open source project developer communities!
Culture
Liz Henry, Andre Klapper

* Citizenship Online: Open Source Politics

Online deliberation refers to applications which help communities make decisions. This varies from Exploratory deliberation, like Amazon reviews, where an individual makes a decision by consulting their community, to very structured Decision Making deliberations where a community needs to forge a single legally and logically defensible decision.
Culture
Ele Munjeli

* Clone A Git Together Into Your Town

Git is used everywhere, but few structured communities or groups exist. Learn about the PDX Git Together and how to clone this community model into your town.
Culture
Duke Leto

* Conducting Your Open Source Project

How are open source projects like symphonies? In this session, we will review leadership strategies and insights gained from conducting non-profit amateur performing ensembles. We will discuss how to coordinate and lead teams of volunteers in both top-down and self-governing organizations.
Business
Michael Alan Brewer

* Dirty Tricks of Computer Hardware: What You Don't Know Will (Probably Not) Kill You

Ever wonder what you don't know about how your computer hardware really works? Do you tire of lying to your relatives that "gremlins" are the cause of intermittent data loss and blue screens, and not just a car from the 1970s? Let's take a journey into the wonderful world of wonky hardware and find out what can be done about it!
Chemistry
Darrick Wong

* Diversity in open source: What's changed in 2012 and 2013

A few stories we will cover: * 20% women attendees at PyCon US 2013 * 85% of JSConf attendees donated to women in open tech/culture * The success of Black Girls Code * Conferences with 100% white male speakers are now called out for not trying hard enough to find good speakers * Mozilla's adoption of community guidelines that prevent advocacy of discrimination on Planet Mozilla and other Mozilla forums * The rapid growth of PyLadies
Culture
Valerie Aurora, Sumana Harihareswara, Ashe Dryden, Liz Henry, Asheesh Laroia

* DIY Electric Vehicles

Everybody today has heard of electric vehicles, yet almost nobody has ever seen one, touched one, or driven one. I think this is a shame and would like to correct that. Come join me for 45 minutes of explanation and demonstration about the basics of electric vehicles from electric bicycles all the way to passenger vehicles. Building these vehicles at home is easily within the realm of anybody unafraid to pick up a few simple tools and learn a few basic concepts.
Hacks
Benjamin Kero

* DIY: Creativity and Open Source

Panelists will discuss their uses of open source tools in creative applications, from design to art to hardware.
Culture
Melissa Chavez, Sarah Sharp, Cloë Latchkey, Cameron Adamez

* FAIL is Not a Four-Letter Word

Projects fail. Companies crash and burn. Screws fall out all the time; the world is an imperfect place. Just because it happens doesn’t mean we can’t do our best to prevent it or—at the very least—to minimize the damage when it does. As a matter of fact, embracing failure can be one of the best things you do for your organization.
Culture
VM Brasseur

* Firefox Bug Rodeo!

Hands-on Bugzilla wrassling, Firefox busting, barrel riding showdown. Enter the dazzling gladiatorial arena of BUG TRIAGE with MOZILLA! We will make bugzilla.mozilla.org accounts, practice reading and understanding bug reports, discuss why and how to investigate and add information to bugs, explore searches and reports, and feel the glorious feeling of contributing to open access to information and awesome browsers for all!
Cooking
Liz Henry

* FirefoxOS

FirefoxOS is Mozilla's response to the problems that it sees with the mobile space. Walled gardens, platform fragmentation, and single-purpose SDKs in non-web programming languages threaten to close off the open web from the mobile space. In this presentation I will be covering the basics of FirefoxOS, and how it is the only mobile OS that answers to nobody but you.
Chemistry
Benjamin Kero

* Geek Choir - Fast!

A hands-on session in which we show how to increase team identity, cohesion, and collaboration via singing.
Culture
Michael Alan Brewer

* Hacking social software with pump.io

pump.io is a platform for people who love writing social software and hate ever-changing terms of service. It's an Open Source, federated social network that works! And it's fun, too.
Chemistry
Evan Prodromou

* Hacking your Meatware: exercises you can do at your desk

You will learn about risks to your neck, shoulders, hips and core from sitting at a keyboard for hours at a time. Learn a quick 6-breath sun salutation, simple stretches, the need for regular movement. Discuss sitting, standing, walking, reclining. Simple, incremental, safe, easy.
Hacks
Kurt Sussman

* Human Interfaces for Geeks

As technical professionals we excel at understanding protocols, standards, file-formats, and APIs. Whenever there is a doubt as to the correct way to do things, one merely needs to read the fine manual or source code. Unfortunately the reference manual for humans was lost a long time ago, and the source code is poorly documented. We've been struggling with inter-human communication ever since. Paul Fenwick will present his findings at reverse-engineering the human communication protocol.
Culture
Paul Fenwick

* It's OK to be Average

Open Source communities are often full of "the one who invented ___" people. They've written RFCs, gotten patents, published software that's already installed on every computer you'll ever buy. It can be kind of intimidating. But there's room for more than that--and welcoming more people can improve your project exponentially!
Culture
Noirin Plunkett

* Just Don't Lick the Cookie: an open discussion about organizational dysfunction

When someone claims a task and then doesn't do anything with it, we call that "licking the cookie." Nobody in their right mind would pick up and eat the licked cookie or finish the project. In this session well talk about common forms of organizational dysfunction, and then facilitate a group discussion about working around, over, under or through organizational dysfunctions you've encountered.
Culture
Kellie Brownell, Sumana Harihareswara

* Keynote — Alex “Skud” Bayley

Keynote by Alex “Skud” Bayley
Culture
Alex Bayley

* Kicking Impostor Syndrome In The Head

Impostor syndrome -- the persistent belief that any minute everyone around you is going to figure out you're not at all qualified -- happens to a majority of the tech industry; nobody talks about it, because nobody wants to be the first to admit it. This talk confronts that feeling head-on, and addresses ways to readjust your perceptions of your accomplishments to accurately reflect reality.
Culture
Denise Paolucci

* Labor, ethics and computing

An exploration of labor and ethics from various points in the life of a computer -- from the day-to-day software programming and hardware inside the computer down to the materials used in various components. Includes the implications for open source hardware and software as well as possible future solutions.
Chemistry
Cameron Adamez

* Let The Internet Work For You

Creating a successful Open Source project isn’t intuitive, or easy. Converting a brilliant idea into a working code base, then publishing it to Github (with significant adoption) is hard enough, nevermind building an ideal development and release workflow. Sometimes, getting your OSS code out to the community is the easy part -- then the real work ensues. Juggling between the roles of; creator, maintainer and contributor while managing the interests of the group effort (IRC, mailing lists etc) and issue trackers can quickly scale from simple and exciting, to a time consuming full time job. I plan to take you on a ride, demonstrating how Open Source developers can leverage free service offerings (for open source) to make your life as a project maintainer easier and more rewarding; from development and QA automation through to continuous deployment.
Cooking
Sebastian Tiedtke

* Morning Keynote: James Vasile

Open source!
Culture
James Vasile

* Morning Keynote: Ashe Dryden

It's been scientifically proven that more diverse communities and workplaces create better products and the solutions to difficult problems are more complete and diverse themselves. Companies are struggling to find adequate talent. So why do we see so few women, people of color, and LGBTQ people at our events and on the about pages of our websites? Even more curiously, why do 60% of women leave the tech industry within 10 years? Why are fewer women choosing to pursue computer science and related degrees than ever before? Why have stories of active discouragement, dismissal, harassment, or worse become regular news?
Culture
Ashe Dryden

* Negotiation: Because You're Worth It

There's only one person who wins when you don't negotiate, and it's not you. But, as any logician will tell you, that doesn't tell us about what happens when you do negotiate. I'm here to help!
Business
Noirin Plunkett

* No, I Won't Contribute to Your Open Source Project

The growth of the open community is inspiring. Yet despite this, most projects find it remarkably difficult to get people to contribute. Why?
Culture
VM Brasseur

* Open Sourcing Depression

In the spirit of open source, I'd like to shine a spotlight on depression. Not because it's easy, but because it's important. Mental illness affects many of us, but the stigma attached to it dissuades most people from talking about it openly. That's not how we make progress. With this talk, I want to do my part.
Culture
Edward Finkler

* PHP for Pirates: pillaging interactive debugging from Ruby and JavaScript.

It's sad that in 2013, var_dump and die are still two of the most common debugging and reflection techniques in PHP. Let's explore the state of interactive debugging in PHP, compare it with what's available in other languages, and apply this with practical tools and techniques which can be used today.
Cooking
Justin Hileman

* Quantitative community management

In this talk, you will learn the state of the art in community measurement, common mistakes made in surveying, and how to actively use data to improve activity within a project.
Culture
Asheesh Laroia

* Robotron Autopsy: Learning About Hardware From Vintage Video Games

Studying and building hardware is easier than you think. Using software concepts as a metaphor, I will reverse-engineer the 1982 arcade game machine "Robotron: 2084" and reimplement it in modern hardware.
Hacks
Jared Boone

* Running with Scissors: Open Source Team Dynamics

Team dynamics are tricky. They're different when you're volunteering your time, when you're working for someone, or when you're trying to build something and invite someone else to build other good things too.
Culture
Amye Scavarda

* Rust: A Friendly Introduction

Conventional wisdom says that writing high-performance code means working without the safety net of credible compile-time safety checks. Mozilla Research (a community of researchers, engineers, and volunteers) is trying to prove that conventional wisdom wrong by building Rust, a new systems programming language. Rust takes advantage of well-understood programming language technology to combine aggressive compile-time error checking with the high degree of direct control over the machine necessary to write efficient systems programs. By way of examples, I'll teach you how to use Rust to write fast and trustworthy code.
Cooking
Tim Chevalier

* Shall We Play A Game?

In just 1.5 hours, I will help you craft a computer game AI that will consistently beat you and your friends.
Chemistry
Bart Massey

* Simple Questions Should Have Simple Answers

What happens when a project begins to embrace the philosophy that simple questions should have simple answers? Q: Simple to whom? A: Simple to the person asking the question. "Simple questions should have simple answers" has given me a lot of design clarity in my projects. I hope to convince you of its beneficial effects.
Culture
Michael Schwern

* Smart Asana

Yoga returns to Open Source Bridge! Come with your stiff shoulders, sore wrists, tight hips and aching back. Leave with ideas on how to incorporate 5 minutes of practice into your busy day to care for your body and mind.
Culture
Sherri Koehler

* Study Design: the best model for a cat is... a cat!

With good study design you can state how confident you are that you have a cat. You can hypothesis test your cat--is my cat like other cats or is it a dog? You can even design an experiment to determine the correct feeding time for your cat.
Chemistry
Mary Anne Thygesen

* Teaching Robots to See With Javascript

Computer Vision, Javascript, and Flying Drones.
Hacks
Peter Braden

* The "Oh Shit" Graph: What We Can Learn From Wikipedia's Editor Decline Trend

Wikipedia and the other Wikimedia projects have been hemorrhaging editors for the past five years. We're going to talk about the reasons why, how they can affect other projects, and what you can do to prevent it in yours.
Chemistry
Brandon Harris

* The Care and Feeding of Volunteers: Lessons from Non-Profits and OSS

Volunteers are the lifeblood of OSS projects. From behemoths like the Linux Foundation to every little project on SourceForge, volunteers keep things moving forward. Retaining happy and motivated volunteers is a crucial step in creating a healthy organization. In this talk, I will discuss the whys and wherefors of encouraging and directing your volunteers in the context of both traditional non-profits and OSS projects.
Culture
Kat Toomajian

* The Perl Renaissance

The Perl Renaissance is in full swing. Join internationally acclaimed speaker and White Camel Award winner Paul Fenwick as we explore some of the most freakin' amazing developments in the land of Perl!
Chemistry
Paul Fenwick

* The problem with passwords on the web and what to do about it

Handling user passwords safely is hard, but replacing passwords on the web in a reasonable way is even harder. Really, this should have been in the browser all along. This is where Persona comes in.
Chemistry
François Marier

* Training the trainers

This long session is a tutorial, with exercises, on how to run welcoming, effective outreach events targeted at bringing newcomers into your communities.
Cooking
Asheesh Laroia

Favorite proposals for this user

* A Year with Mojolicious, the Perl Web Framework

Mojolicious is a relatively new web framework written in Perl, but I've been using it for a year to power a REST API, two web apps, and a website. In this talk I introduce Mojo and discuss its fun and not so fun parts, particularly in view of using it as the sole backend for a real SaaS-based, PaaS-deployed business. Join this talk and learn about Mojolicious--a fun, new Perl web framework--from someone who's spent a year in the field with it.
Cooking 2013-03-09 01:37:51 +0000
Daniel Nichter

* Conference Presentation Mind Control

Have you been at a talk which sounded great on paper, but was lackluster in delivery? Have you discovered that some presenters can seem to make *anything* interesting? Do you want to know how to hack audiences to convince them that your talk is *freakin' amazing* even though it's content-challenged? Want to use your conference presentation skills to kickstart your career in world domination? BYO tinfoil hat.
Hacks 2013-03-10 05:06:32 +0000
Paul Fenwick

* Digital Nomad: How to stay connected anywhere in the world

For some of us staying connected to the internet is an imperative, and while traveling to foreign lands it can sometimes be difficult to remain connected. Let me share with you some of the techniques that I've discovered for remaining connected while abroad.
Cooking 2013-03-10 04:48:51 +0000
Benjamin Kero

* Git & GitHub for Ninjas

You're a git user, and you love what it does for you. Learn how to take it to the next level, straight from the experts at GitHub.
Cooking 2013-03-06 18:29:41 +0000
Ben Straub

* Git Going with Github

Git is hard. There's no way around that. But it's also incredibly powerful. Github is not all of git. It's not even most of git. But it's (mostly!) friendly, and getting a handle on it opens up worlds of possibilities, from contributing to projects to saving your own work. And it's a great stepping-stone if you want to go on and learn more git.
Cooking 2013-03-08 20:07:48 +0000
Noirin Plunkett

* Let's hack the web, 1 API at a time!

If you ever wanted to implement your own DOM API but were afraid, fear not! The power is within your grasp at last!
Cooking 2013-02-14 02:09:24 +0000
Jeff Griffiths

* Open Sourcing Book Publishing

You've got a great idea for a book. You write a publisher. You get accepted! Then you find out that they'll pay you $500 and a 10% royalty for your book rights, in exchange for your heart and soul over the next six months. You're crushed. Is there a better way? There certainly is!
Business 2013-03-06 16:40:03 +0000
Brandon Savage

* Opposing Authority in Open Source

In this talk I'll showcase insights we can garner from left wing anti-establishment movements such as community radio stations, unions and cooperatives and how you can use those techniques to grow, scale and manage open source communities, while still dismantling the authority.
Culture 2013-03-08 22:08:57 +0000
Francesca Krihely

* Pricing: Uncensored

Pricing is an issue with which even non-profits need to wrestle. It's a necessity for a healthy, growing business. There is no shame in pricing, nor in understanding its principles and how to do it correctly, respecting everyone's needs and boundaries.
Business 2013-02-05 19:48:19 +0000
VM Brasseur

* What Hath Perl Wrought?

When was the last time you looked at some Perl code? Was it readable? Was it like an archeological expedition, traveling back in time to 1994? Modern Perl is very different from the Perl of our ancestors, and if you've been away for a while, the tools that are available now will blow your mind.
Chemistry 2013-02-19 19:29:48 +0000
Mike Friedman

Open Source Bridge 2011

Favorite sessions for this user

* "Why did you do that?" You're more automated than you think.

Your brain is really good at surviving in neolithic Africa, but not because of our powers of higher levels of thought; they're much too slow. Humans are so successful as a species because we're champions at automating things, including our own thoughts and behaviours. What's fascinating is that we're profoundly unaware of just how much our own lives run on automatic, and just how much our own behaviour is influenced by external factors. Join internationally acclaimed speaker Paul Fenwick as we examine the fascinating world of the human mind.
Culture
Paul Fenwick

* Bitcoin 101

An introduction to the cryptocurrency system called Bitcoin. The cryptography, the economics of currency bootstrapping, and the traction its getting today.
Culture
Don Park

* ePUB - What, Why, and How

ePUB is the open e-book standard. Building on previous open standards, the ePUB format allows for flexible and flowing documentation, perfect for viewing on a variety of devices where the forced page sizing of other formats fails. We'll crack open some ePUB files and take a look at the innards and then we'll check out some tools to make ePUB generation less painful.
Cooking
Jason LaPier

* Geek Fitness: Your Body is not Just Transportation for Your Brain

Optimize your productivity by keeping your body healthy. Learn how to prevent 'laptop back' and RSI; extend your workday by taking care of your body.
Chemistry
Kurt Sussman

* Get 'Em While They're Young: Cultivating the Next Generation of Open Source Contributors

Many open source projects participate in college mentorship programs, but what about younger students? Should we be cultivating the next generation of contributors from an earlier age?
Culture
Jane Wells

* Growing Food with Open Source

Open source folks are naturally lazy. Anything mundane task they can automate, they will. So what does an open source developer do when faced with planning, planting, and tediously watering a garden? Automate!
Hacks
Sarah Sharp

* How to Ask for Money

Have a project that just needs some cash to get off the ground? Need someone to fund beer and food for an event? Have a great idea and want to get paid for implementing it? Come find out how we did it.
Business
Selena Deckelmann, J Chris Anderson, Teyo Tyree

* IRL: How Do Geeks Undermine Their Presentations and Conversations with Body Language

Many geeks are uncomfortable interacting IRL with clients or audiences but you don't have to be. There are some simple physical tricks to keeping an audience (of 1 or 1k) engaged and not undermining your skills and yourself.
Hacks
Sarah Novotny

* Kick Asana

"Yoga for Geeks", sometimes known as "Yoga for Long-Haul Travelers", returns to Open Source Bridge! Come with your stiff shoulders, sore wrists, tight hips and aching back. Leave with ideas on how to incorporate 5 minutes of practice into your busy day to care for your body and mind.
Culture
Sherri Koehler

* Marketing: You're Soaking In It!

Come join me as I dispel some of the clouds of pollution which obscure the name of marketing, show how it can help your projects, reveal how--whether you realize it or not--you already use marketing every day and how that's a very good thing indeed.
Business
VM Brasseur

* Modern Perl Made Painless

Improvements in Perl 5 over the past several years allow great programmers to do great things with less code. You too can turn your Perl 5 code from mere scripting into powerful, clear, and modern programming--with help from a few tools the world's best Perl programmers already know and love.
Cooking
Chromatic X

* Morning Keynote - Hacking for Freedom

The last year has shown the Internet and computers to be a major force for freedom and self-determination around the world. The presenter discusses his work as a hacktivist. Working with Anonymous and Telecomix, he has helped organized protests in support of WikiLeaks, provided communications support to Egypt and the Middle East, and generally fought the good fight.
Culture
Peter Fein

* Seven Habits Of Highly Obnoxious Trolls

Developing more effective habits isn't just for the good guys. We'll discuss seven methodologies that make trolls more effective---and tell you what you can do about it.
Culture
Bart Massey, Selena Deckelmann, Duke Leto

* Technical Debt

Technical debt is something that most project teams or independent developers have to deal with - we take shortcuts to push out releases, deadlines need to be met, quick fixes slowly become the standard. In this talk, we will discuss what technical debt is, when it is acceptable and when it isn't, and strategies for effectively managing it, both on an independent and team level.
Cooking
Elizabeth Naramore

* User, User, Who Art Thou?

What's going on in the mind of the user as they use your system? Did they choose it, or was it chosen for them? Do they like it or hate it? How can you tell? This talk discusses the types of users that exist, and their motivations.
Cooking
Jacinta Richardson

Open Source Bridge 2010

Favorite sessions for this user

* Connecting to Web Services on Android

This presentation will show how to connect to REST-based web services from an Android application. We'll discuss HTTP programming as well as XML and JSON libraries. This presentation will include a live demo of an Android application.
Cooking
Sean Sullivan

* Free Speech, Free Software Across the World

How does free software help defend free speech in repressive regimes? Danny O'Brien will draw from the records of the Committee to Protect Journalists to explore how open source can help those at the cutting edge of free expression.
Culture
Danny O'Brien

* Functional Requirements: Thinking Like A Pirate

Creating functional requirements as a part of the planning process is like creating a treasure map. You want to get compensated for the value your cool built-with-open-source-thing is providing to your clients. Your clients want it to work better than what they originally had in mind. If you do the work upfront, you'll know when you've hit the X marks the spot.
Business
Amye Scavarda, Bill Fitzgerald

* Geek Choir

This is exactly what it looks like: We're going to make you sing. ;)
Culture
Michael Alan Brewer

* Give a Great Tech Talk

Why do so many technical presentations suck? Make sure that yours doesn't. Josh Berkus and Ian Dees will show you how to share your ideas with your audience by speaking effectively and (when the situation warrants it) showing your code.
Culture
Josh Berkus, Ian Dees

* Hair and Yak Again -- A Hacker's Tale

API design, parallelism, automated testing, parallel automated testing, deployment, build tools, meta programming, GUI design and construction, hardware interfaces, network protocols, databases, change tracking, file formats, and why simple software becomes an epic journey.
Chemistry
Eric Wilhelm

* Housetruck: Building a Victorian RV

As a "software person," I found the hard technologies of building with steel and wood made for a very different creative and hacking process. At the same time, I discovered many parallels to software development, embedded hardware, and even open-source philosophies.
Hacks
John Labovitz

* How To Report A Bug

Bug reports drive Open Source, but too often it's a hostile experience. As a user, how do you report a bug without being treated like you're dumping a sack of crap on the developer's doorstep? As a developer, how do you encourage users to report bugs? This is not a tutorial, but an examination of the social aspects of bug reporting.
Cooking
Michael Schwern

* Listening to Data - Sonification Using Open Source Tools

Hearing your data - exploratory data analysis by way of algorithmic composition
Hacks
M. Edward (Ed) Borasky

* Making Robots Accessible to Everyone

I've been looking for an affordable, flexible, easy to learn robotics platform for years that I could use to teach kids the basics of programming/electronics/robotics. Last Fall, I finally found it.
Culture
Brett Nelson, Jim Larson

* Move Your Asana

This yoga session is of benefit to anyone who sits and works on computers a lot. Breathing exercises and physical postures that can be done anytime to help maintain a healthy body and clear mind will be taught. Suggestions will be included for how to modify stretches to protect injuries and provide gentle opening.
Culture
Sherri Koehler

* OAuth: an Open Specification for Web Services

Curious about OAuth? Ever wondered why OAuth has steadily gained popularity among major API providers such as Google and Twitter? Ever wondered how OAuth helps streamline consuming data from other providers? Learn more about OAuth the specification and how to implement OAuth with PHP5. The session will cover the basics of OAuth, and follow up with an OAuth implementation using php.net/oauth.
Hacks
John Jawed

* Open Source and the Open Social Web

Open Source software has been instrumental in the development of every revolutionary communications technology on the Internet. The Open social Web is no different.
Chemistry
Evan Prodromou

* Organizing user groups, a panel discussion

User groups are a vital part of the open source community. Learn more about how to start a group, keep it going, and make an existing group better from a panel of experienced user group organizers.
Culture
Igal Koshevoy, Jesse Hallett, Eric Wilhelm, Christie Koehler, gabrielle roth, Audrey Eschright, Sam Keen

* Practical Facebook stalking with Open Source tools

Facebook are full of juicy information about your friends and strangers alike! Learn how to use some simple open source tools and techniques to learn more about them.
Hacks
Paul Fenwick

* Teach your class to fish, and they'll have food for a lifetime.

You have so much you want to teach, how do you structure it so that your training course is both interesting and challenging? How much theory can you squeeze into an hour before your attendees have forgotten where you started? How do you structure your course to account for classes which move slower or faster than average? This talk will cover all of these answers and more.
Business
Jacinta Richardson

* The $2 computer: ultraconstrained devices do your bidding

"Do you watch television? Is your furnace loud? Do you have $2?" My 7-year-old's marketing suggestions aside, building custom gadgets to improve your life is remarkably simple, and I'll prove it by building something on stage that you can duplicate at home.
Hacks
David Hollingsworth

* The Fine Line Between Creepy and Fun

Social software is kind of a big deal right now. In the open-source spirit of transparency and dissection, let's talk about what makes social technology creepy, what makes it fun, and how to hack things to maximize your desired outcome.
Hacks
Audrey Eschright

* The Return of Command-Line Kung Fu

A follow-on to last year's highly popular presentation, Hal Pomeranz returns with another super-size helping of command-line madness!
Cooking
Hal Pomeranz

* The Rise of Hacker Spaces

Leigh will be discussing hacker spaces, and the culture of DIY spaces for making things around the world.
Culture
Leigh Honeywell

* The Story of Spaz: How to Give Away Everything, Make No Money, and Still Win

What motivates us as developers? How do we define success? Throughout the development of Spaz, we've learned a lot about what works, what doesn't, and what really matters. Come to hear the story, and participate in the discussion of how we define success in open source.
Business
Edward Finkler

* Unlikely tools for pair programming

Co-conspirators Jamey Sharp and Josh Triplett get up to a lot of miscellaneous hacking mischief together. Much of this hacking occurs while staring at the same screen, and tag-teaming the keyboard. Sometimes this happens with the two of them in different places. We'll demo our favorite tools and invite audience contributions to the discussion.
Cooking
Jamey Sharp, Josh Triplett

* Using Modern Perl

Since 2001, Perl 5 has undergone a renaissance. Modern Perl programs are powerful, maintainable, and understandable. Come learn how to take advantage of perl circa 2010.
Cooking
Chromatic X

* Why the Sysadmin Hates Your Software

You've worked really hard on your software. It's stable and has lots of nice features and users love it. But your sysadmin hates it and complains about how hard it is to install, configure, and manage. What's up with that?
Chemistry
Steve VanDevender

* Your Internets are Leaking

Using your computer on a public network is like having a conversation on a city bus: people you don't know can hear everything you say. They'll probably be polite and ignore you, but you still might not want to shout out your credit card number. Yet this is what your computer does. All the time. And you don't know it.
Cooking
Reid Beels, Michael Schwern

Favorite proposals for this user

* Awesome things you've missed in Perl

Awesome things have been happening in Perl recently; so many that even if you've been paying close attention, you may have missed a few. In this talk we'll examine some of the coolest recent technologies for Perl programmers.
Cooking 2010-03-26 02:18:27 +0000
Paul Fenwick

* Code Happier With The Cycle: Code, Test, Fail, Diff, Fix, Pass, Commit, Repeat

If I could convince developers of one thing it would be this: Writing tests and using version control together during development is the simplest way to improve your life. So I will.
Cooking 2010-03-26 01:12:49 +0000
Michael Schwern

* Debt-Free: Technical Debt In Open Source Projects

Ship or fix? This choice presents itself to open source projects every day, and the consequences can be considerable. Learn how to control this "technical debt" in open source projects.
Cooking 2010-03-15 14:30:18 +0000
Brandon Savage

* perl5i: Perl 5 Improved

perl5i is a single module bringing together the best magic Perl programmers have to offer catapulting the basic language forward. Suddenly everything is an object! Functions return objects and throw exceptions! You don't have to load six modules to work with files! Perl 5 is fun again!
Hacks 2010-03-26 00:52:24 +0000
Michael Schwern

* REPENT!!! FOR THE END OF THE UNIX EPOCH IS NIGH!!!

SINNERS!! HEAR ME!! For too long have you lain contented and SLOTHFUL in the illusion that time is infinite! SOON the UNIX EPOCH will END and numbers will OVERFLOW their confines CLEANSING all in a flood the likes we have not seen since 1901!!! The SINS of your 32 BITS will chase your children and your children's children unless you REPENT NOW and cleanse your code of the 2038 BUG!!
Chemistry 2010-03-26 00:33:39 +0000
Michael Schwern

* Running an open source training business

Starting a business is easy. Starting a successful business is only a little bit harder. But how do you keep an open source training business going and making money when the shine has worn off and it's now just hard work?
Business 2010-03-25 13:03:04 +0000
Jacinta Richardson

* The Complex Ethics of Piracy

The Complex Ethics of Piracy This talk aims to replace the "piracy is good" vs "piracy is theft" debate with a more nuanced understanding. It will investigate when piracy is selfish; when it is civil disobedience; whether it is ever constructive for cultural industries, or whether it is ever, as copyright holders argue, "theft". I will conclude that each of these things is sometimes true about piracy, and that simple views are inadequate for understanding the ethical dimension of copyright infringement. Both pirates and copyright industries need to develop more subtle understandings of the morality of file sharing.
Culture 2010-03-30 04:24:31 +0000
Peter Eckersley

Open Source Bridge 2009 Birds of a Feather

Favorite sessions for this user

* Code-n-Splode BOF

BOF to go with the "My Grand Experiment" Talk. http://opensourcebridge.org/sessions/115
BoF
gabrielle roth

* PDXCritique

PDXCritique is an open forum where anyone who makes things can get constructive criticism on their work from their peers.
BoF
ben hengst

Open Source Bridge 2009

Favorite sessions for this user

* CodeIgniter As Drinking Game

DRINK.
Cooking
Jeffrey McManus

* Faking It Til I Make It: A Woman On The Fringe Of Open Source

As a long-time user of open source software, I've often considered myself an advocate but not necessarily a participant. Over the last year and a half, my own search for technical inspiration has led me full-circle to the realization that I'm an active member of a vibrant community of technical women.
Culture
Maria Webster

* Friday Unconference Kickoff & Scheduling

Welcome to the unconference day.
Culture
Audrey Eschright, Selena Deckelmann, Chris Messina

* Get Off Your Asana and Move!

This is a yoga workshop for anyone who sits and works on computers a lot. You will learn breathing exercises and physical postures that can be done at anytime to help maintain a healthy body and clear mind. Suggestions will be included for how to modify stretches to protect injuries and provide gentle opening.
Culture
Sherri Koehler

* Making Twitter Suck Less With Perl

Spam is starting to infiltrate Twitter and other similar online communities. Learn how to use Perl to filter to garbage from the gold and search for what matters to you.
Hacks
Jonathan Leto

* My Grand Experiment: A Portland Women-focused Tech Group.

The idea for Code-n-Splode grew out of the Women in Open Source BOF at OSCON 2007. I'll talk about my original reasons for starting a women-friendly tech group, how the group is evolving, and what I've learned.
Culture
gabrielle roth

* Re-factor Your Brain: Meditation for Geeks

Meditation is the ultimate open source tool. You can do it anywhere and it’s free. It requires only your brain and your body. It’s positive effects are numerous, including increased productivity, better problem-solving and a reduction in overall stress. Learn about long-term effects of mediation on the brain, some meditation techniques and how mediation can help you do your job better.
Culture
Christie Koehler

* Thursday Keynotes

Featuring Mayor Sam Adams and Ward Cunningham
Culture
Audrey Eschright, Selena Deckelmann, Ward Cunningham

* Unit Test Your Database!

Given that the database, as the canonical repository of data, is the most important part of many applications, why is it that we don't write database unit tests? This talk promotes the practice of implementing tests to directly test the schema, storage, and functionality of databases.
Cooking
David Wheeler

* Wednesday Welcome and Keynotes

Featuring Amber Case, Cyborg Anthropologist, and Kurt von Finck of Monty Program AB.
Culture
Audrey Eschright, Selena Deckelmann, Amber Case, Kurt von Finck