Audrey Eschright's favorites

Open Source Bridge 2016

Favorite sessions for this user

* Free Culture in an Expensive World

Money is a common worry, inside the open source community and out, but we often feel uncomfortable discussing it. We’ll talk about why that is and how our social norms around money impact who participates in open source and how they do so. The heart of this talk will be a series of case studies based on interviews with community members covering various economic models for open source, including worker co-ops, grant-funded and academic projects, for-profit business models, crowdfunding campaigns, and all-volunteer projects. We’ll explore the sustainability of each model as well as how they deal with the social pressures outlined in the first part of the talk.
Business
Shauna Gordon-McKeon

Open Source Bridge 2015

Favorite sessions for this user

* "A huge green fierce snake bars the way!"; or, Building a Text Adventure Game in Python

Have you ever wanted to vanquish a dragon with your bare hands? First step is making a world where you can. In this talk, I'll give you the blueprints for my Python text adventure engine, as well as some recipes for making things in a text-only world.
Cooking
Katie Silverio

* A Profile of Performance Profiling With pprof

When our code is slow, performance gains can often difficult to obtain. Our ideas of where to focus our attention are often wrong. pprof has become my go to tool, and it's easy to see why. Together we'll learn how to understand pprof's output to help us zero in on the parts of our code that need the most love.
Cooking
Lauren Voswinkel

* Bringing Security to Your Open Source Project

With high profile breaches in open source projects, the issue of security has become one of great import to many people. But many projects, especially smaller ones, are intimidated by the idea of a security audit. This talk will discuss ways for smaller projects to experiment, learn, and even have fun improving their security. No PhDs in security required!
Culture
Terri Oda

* Build a Web Map with Open Source Tools

Come learn to make a map on the web! In this tutorial, we will build an interactive, data-filled web map using a number of open source tools including Mapbox.js (a JavaScript library based on Leaflet.js). We will cover several options for interactivity and data sources, and show how to integrate with external APIs and other mapping tools.
Cooking
Lyzi Diamond

* Building Diverse Social Networks

While only a handful of social networks like Dreamwidth and Quirell explicitly prioritize diversity, there are plenty of lessons to learn about what to do — and what not to do — from Facebook, Twitter, and others. Best practices include counter-oppressive politics, embedded in the community guidelines and norms; and the right tools, technologies, and policies. This session will look at what does and doesn't work in a variety of online environments.
Culture
Jon Pincus, Lynn Cyrin

* Calculating Guilt: Using open-source software in forensic DNA testing

DNA testing has become the "gold standard" of forensics, but linking an item of evidence to a person of interest isn't always clear cut. New open source tools allow DNA analysts to give statistical weight to evidentiary profiles that were previously unusable, letting juries weigh the evidence for themselves. This talk will discuss my lab's validation and implementation of the Lab Retriever software package for probabilistic genotyping.
Culture
Sarah Chenoweth

* Cassandra at the Keyboard: Whistleblowing at all scales

What do you do if you see something that needs change in your organization. How do you "say something" for your "see something"? What are the benefits and drawbacks of even minor whistleblowing?
Culture
Heidi Waterhouse

* Community Moderation: you can't always halt a flamewar with one raised eyebrow (but it rarely hurts to try)

Even in an email list, moderation isn't limited to setting the entire email list to require approval before messages are posted. You can create rules which reflect the culture you'd like to see, and call attention to ways that the community differs from that culture. You can point out when a particular post doesn't fit with that culture -- publicly or privately, whichever you think will do the most good. You can point out when a particular post exemplifies something great about the culture. You can point out particular rules that everyone needs to keep abiding by, without calling out a specific post. If a specific person, or a specific handful of people, have trouble with the rules, you could put them in particular on moderated posting for some time. If someone keeps breaking the rules, that person is a good candidate for being removed entirely. There are limits to what the rest of the community and the moderators should have to deal with, even though your project may choose to keep that as a last resort. Sometimes the problem can be solved by redirection. If the main email list is getting cluttered with off-topic posts, consider a just-for-fun or off-topic side list to divert threads to once they wander off code and into sports, kittens, beer, or knitting. It's easier to say "You shouldn't do that here" than "You shouldn't do that, period"; it's even easier to say "You shouldn't do that here, but it would be great right over there." And most of us could use a sports, kittens, beer, or knitting break every now and then.
Culture
Azure Lunatic

* Desigining for Renaming

Renaming yourself is never easy. In Santa Clara County in the State of California, to file a petition to change one's name costs over $400, and may take six months or more. Then one must change one's name (and possibly one's gender marker) on the dozens of sites and services one uses. On many sites, that's easy, I go to preferences and edit my name. But then the site addresses me as "Mr. Emma Humphries," oh really? Other systems will correctly greet me as "Emma" when I log in. But still call me by $DEAD_NAME when they send an email. This brings us to the first best practice: When I change my name in one place, change it in all the places.
Culture
Emma Humphries

* Dog Food is for Dogs: Escape the Crate of Your Perspective with User Research

Dogfooding—using your own products—is nice, but is it sufficient to produce good design for people who aren’t you? Our familiarity with our projects and their quirks makes us poor substitutes for users in the wild. So just who are these users, and how do you incorporate them into design and development? In this workshop, we'll explore user experience design and research strategies that will help you design for people who aren’t you.
Cooking
Rachel Shadoan, amelia abreu

* Email as Distributed Protocol Transport: How Meeting Invites Work and Ideas for the Future

Learn how meeting invites work and some crazy other ideas for distributed protocols built on email.
Chemistry
Christine Spang

* Five years, 1000 students: The story of Open Source Comes to Campus

Since 2010, OpenHatch has been running workshops at college campuses, teaching undergrads how to get involved in open source. In 2015, we expect to reach over 500 students through 25 events. This talk presents how we've the scaled program over the years, how we've evolved our curriculum, and how you can get involved.
Culture
Asheesh Laroia

* How to Really Get Git

You already know how to use “git status”, “git push”, and “git add” for your personal projects. You know how to work on a team project with git version control. How do you achieve the next level of git mastery and fix mistakes? We’ll cover how to set up your git environment for a productive workflow, different ways to undo your mistakes in git, and finally, how to use the IPython notebook to automate an entire git workflow.
Hacks
Susan Tan

* How to Teach Git

Version control is a necessary piece of the open source community and git has an unfortunately steep learning curve. Here is what I have learned from teaching git to beginners, so you don’t have to make the same mistakes.
Chemistry
Georgia Reh

* How We Learned To Stop Worrying And Love (Or At Least Live With) GitHub

In the past few years, GitHub has become the most widely used platform for managing open source projects, thanks to the ease it provides for submitting and accepting pull requests. However, GitHub's issue tracker is not as full featured as more venerable bug trackers such as Bugzilla, and it is not as easy to use for organizations which have a large number of casual contributors. Come hear how one organization coped with the sudden loss of their Bugzilla database by restructuring their tracking workflow to use GitHub's built-in issue management features, as well as implementing API hooks to provide missing functionality.
Cooking
Jen Griffin, Athena Yao

* How you tell the story matters: telling better stories and making better technologies

What happens when we tell stories? How do we tell stories about the technology we build, why do some stories get told over others? How do we talk about our successes, and how do we not talk about our failures? Whose stories get heard: how do women, people of color, disabled people, and “non-technical” workers get left out of the stories we hear? In this talk, I'll explore the role of storytelling in technology, and share what I've found about telling better stories.
Business
amelia abreu

* HTTP Can Do That?!

I have explored weird corners of HTTP -- malformed requests that try to trick a site admin into clicking spam links in 404 logs, an API that responds to POST but not GET, and more. In this talk I'll walk you through those (using Python, netcat, and other tools you might have lying around the house).
Hacks
Sumana Harihareswara

* Internet of Things Militia: Paramilitary Training for your IoT devices

Security folk generally talk about how the Internet of Things is bad for security, but it also brings new sensors and connected devices that could co-operate in new and interesting ways. Could we use internet things to enhance security?
Hacks
Terri Oda

* Leveraging Docker to Enable Learning

When giving workshops or presenting online tutorials, it's frequently the case that the system setup can take longer than the actual learning exercises. Using Docker to provide a learning sandbox solves this problem while avoiding changing the learner's system in potentially destructive ways.
Cooking
Kirsten Hunter

* Making Docker Actually Work

Workflow and tools to make Docker work the way it should, in production and in development
Cooking
Simon McFarlane

* Open source collaboration for tackling real world environmental problems

Public Lab is a two-part project -- an attempt at large-scale community environmental monitoring, AND a massively distributed R&D lab for inventing new monitoring techniques and equipment. The community has grown a lot over the past five years, and we are here to share stories of -- and welcome you to -- an emerging FOSS culture that spans hardware, software, data, community organizing, and advocacy.
Culture
Dana Bauer, Mathew Lippincott

* Removing Barriers: Ascend Project Post Mortem

Last year the Ascend Project was announced, then in the fall the first pilot took place in Portland. This year we'll report back on how it went, hear from participants, and break down what worked and what could be changed for future versions of this type of program. You'll definitely come away with some ideas for your next learning event, code school, or sponsored training.
Hacks
Lukas Blakk, Kronda Adair

* Software Archeology and The Code Of Doom

You approach the legacy codebase with trepidation. If the vine-draped entrance and collapsing roof weren't enough warning, traces of previous explorers before you lie scattered about, caught in bizarre traps and oubliettes. What next, snakes?!
Chemistry
Kerri Miller

* The Graceful Exit: Approaches for Changing One's Role in an Open Community

Open culture communities are passionate, dedicated backed by people. What happens when those people need to change their roles within the community? I've played varied roles in open culture communities through the years. In this talk I'll go over what worked well and what I wish I had approached in a different way when my role needed to change.
Culture
Kate Chapman

* The Open Source Writing Stack

Open source makes writing and publishing much easier both online and in print — provided you know what tools to use. This talk covers those tools (from LaTeX to WordPress) and how to choose between them.
Hacks
Thursday Bram

* Through the Warp Zone: Hacking Super Mario Brothers

Discover new worlds in Super Mario Brothers even the creators never saw!
Hacks
Emily St., Shawna Scott

* Tricking Out the Terminal: An Introduction

A beginner-focused overview of the particulars and pitfalls of the command line and several common shells, with a focus on improving developer workflows, exposing common default tools, implementing useful open-source tools, and inserting emoji into prompts (pretty much the best part of customizing the terminal).
Chemistry
Lydia Katsamberis

* Troubleshooting In Distributed Systems

The shift to microservice and distributed architectures has made software products more flexible and scalable-- and a lot more complex. With so many moving parts, ephemeral conditions and the spectre of partial failure, it can be much more difficult to pinpoint how and why things break. Learn how Logstash, Elasticsearch and Kibana can be used to monitor healthy systems and investigate issues as they pop up, and what we can do outside of software to improve our process of problem-solving.
Chemistry
Megan Baker

* Venturing into the Spooky Science of Ruby

Grab a scalpel as we put Ruby on the table to look at this lovely language's internals. We'll start with class inheritance and method lookup, and then explore the mysterious eigenclass and how it fits in. We'll use our newfound knowledge to turn children into zombies, meet unexpected vampires, and make our own Ruby mutants. Okay, so maybe it won't be too spooky, but you'll come away having a better understanding of Ruby objects and their internals (and braaaains!).
Chemistry
Zoe Kay

* What Are Computers, Really?

We'll take a whirlwind tour of the theory behind what computers do. We'll start with counting on our fingers and end with an explanation of why there are some problems where the laws of physics say "no, a computer can never do this". No mathematical background necessary.
Chemistry
Clarissa Littler

* When Your Codebase Is Nearly Old Enough To Vote

What do you do when your project is so old that technology has changed around you? (Or, how do you future-proof a project that you've just started so that when it gets that old, you'll be ready?) Come hear a case study of Dreamwidth Studios, a fifteen-year-old web app with a codebase consisting of a quarter million lines of legacy Perl and a mission to modernize ... if it doesn't break everything.
Chemistry
Denise Paolucci

* Why Relationships Matter in Community Building: Experiences from the Philippine Cultural Heritage Mapping Project

What makes a successful project? It's not only a solid idea, firm execution and attention to the numbers. It's also successfully building working relationships between community members. This presentation will explore how one of Wikimedia Philippines' biggest projects was successful in large part to how the organization engaged its participants, and ultimately how they have come to be part of the wider Filipino Wikimedia community.
Culture
Josh Lim

* You Got Your Idris in My C++! A First Look at Denotational Design

Programmers gripe that we have two kinds of programming languages: the ones we write in for fun, and the ones we write in because we have to. We may enjoy coding that weekend project in Agda, but we have to leave that smile behind on Monday morning when we go back to Java or C++. But is that really the case? Or can we find a way of bringing the expressiveness, the rigor, or the fun of our favorite languages into our day jobs?
Chemistry
Ian Dees

Favorite proposals for this user

* 7 years of collaborative calendaring: Exploring Calagator

Seven years in, the Portland tech community's open source calendar aggregator, Calagator, has survived ups and downs, seen the outcome of those Ruby and Rails dogma shifts, and fundamentally changed the way people in Portland tech build community. In this combination talk and installfest, we'll explore the origins, history, impact, and future of Calagator, and how you can use Calagator to improve your local communities and increase engagement. Bring your laptops and your Ruby dev environments, and we'll walk through a fresh install!
Chemistry 2015-03-15 01:02:30 +0000
Shawna Scott

* Continuous Delivery and Large Microservice Architectures: Reflections on Ioncannon

Continuous delivery of a monolith is easy, just automate, automate, automate! But what challenges will you run into applying the same ideas to 300 microservices? Come and find out!
Cooking 2015-02-02 21:50:29 +0000
Kevin Scaldeferri

* Crypto 101

Let's make cryptography less cryptic. This talk would give you a peek into the fun world of ciphers and encryption mechanisms with a basic understanding of the hard problems of mathematics behind the magic.
Chemistry 2015-02-13 16:50:26 +0000
Niharika Kohli

* How learning about Cassandra internals cut our query times in half!

You might think the details of how your database operates internally is arcane knowledge for ops witches, but no! Understanding how it performs writes, reads, and stores data can help you develop better data models that can more effectively support your query patterns and dramatically improve the performance of your application.
Chemistry 2015-03-07 23:28:08 +0000
Amy Hanlon

* Intermediate Bash

Level up your command line skills. Get tips for moving beyond mere proficiency at the command line.
Hacks 2015-03-06 08:56:55 +0000
Amy Boyle

* Keep calm, it's reverse engineering time

As developers, sometimes we have to investigate a bug, or add a new feature in a codebase that is completely new to us, often with no one available to ask anything about that code. How can we do this?
Cooking 2015-03-07 10:37:03 +0000
Alissa Bonas

* Learning Open Source Business Backwards

Things get challenging sometimes. This is an experiment that I'm running, learning about business and open source by taking a sabbatical from all of it. I'll report back on what I learned, what I forgot, and what you might be able to take away from it as well.
Business 2015-03-15 04:52:47 +0000
Amye Scavarda

* Never do the same thing twice

Use tools like Chef, Ansible, Docker and Terraform to not do things over and over.
Chemistry 2015-03-14 21:43:09 +0000
Amy Pivo

* Objectivity is a Myth: Your Data is Not Objective and Neither Are You

Data is often treated as an impartial representation of reality--an unbiased delivery mechanism for "ground truth". Data collection, however, is designed by people, whose knowledge and beliefs influence the design decisions they make. How does that impact what we think we know, and how can we adapt our processes to account for it?
Culture 2015-03-08 01:37:51 +0000
Rachel Shadoan

* Patches: Stories of Open Source

Open source software is awesome. It provides the tools for our jobs, our hobbies, and our dreams. And anyone can contribute! Despite that openness, though, I hesitated for years before getting involved.
Culture 2015-01-17 00:36:36 +0000
Jason Clark

* Sass: What It Is, How It's Used, and Why It's So Syntactically Awesome

This talk will start off with the basics of what Syntactically Awesome StyleSheets are, what features and functionality they have to offer, and why they're a great tool to have in your arsenal. We'll then delve into how to use Sass in developing your own sites and what tools you'll want to use alongside it, complete with a live demo and some in-production examples.
Cooking 2015-02-13 20:41:18 +0000
Lucy Wyman

* Techniques and Tools for Literate DevOps

Lacking the Hermetic knowledge required to administrate servers, we take judicious notes and hyperlinks. Why not combine those written thoughts with the commands we enter to configure and tame our digital beasties? We have a tool for that.
Cooking 2015-02-07 04:41:11 +0000
Howard Abrams, Kasey Alusi

* The Dead Language Fallacy

Our precious programming languages are being struck with a plague. Each year another language is declared dead or dying. But is that true or simply the tech equivalent of tabloid reporting?
Culture 2015-03-07 21:17:21 +0000
VM Brasseur

* The Leap: Building Something Cool as a Beginner

The leap from learning to doing in programming can be terrifying. One hundred step-by-step tutorials will not teach you as much as solving one tough problem in code. This talk will present a process for taking that leap. And I’ll show you how I used that process to build a software plugin that lets you program in plain English.
Hacks 2015-03-07 22:06:13 +0000
Stephanie Losi

Open Source Bridge 2010

Favorite sessions for this user

* Open Source Rockets

PSAS is a student aerospace engineering project at Portland State University. We're building ultra-low-cost, open hardware and open source rockets that feature perhaps the most sophisticated amateur rocket avionics systems out there today.
Hacks
Nathan Bergey, Andrew Greenberg

* Activity Streams, Socialism, and the Future of Open Source

It may seem obvious to some, but the socialist imagery that Mozilla uses isn't accidental. Nor is the grounding of Activity Streams in socialist theory. What do these things have to do with open source an its future? A lot, and I'll paint a picture to tell you how it should play out.
Chemistry
Chris Messina

* eBooks, ePub, iPad, Kindle, o-my

Print is dead. Well, not dead yet. But it'll be stone dead in a moment.
Chemistry
Lennon Day-Reynolds

* Foundations, Non-profits, and Open Source

Should you start a foundation? Should you start a nonprofit? What's the role of non-profits in the Open Source community today? How can you be a good citizen in the Open Source arena with a foundation to support?
Business
Carol Smith

* Free Speech, Free Software Across the World

How does free software help defend free speech in repressive regimes? Danny O'Brien will draw from the records of the Committee to Protect Journalists to explore how open source can help those at the cutting edge of free expression.
Culture
Danny O'Brien

* Hacking Space Exploration

From creating remote-sensing CubeSats to analyzing aerogel: how the public is hacking into open source space exploration.
Culture
Ariel Waldman

* Housetruck: Building a Victorian RV

As a "software person," I found the hard technologies of building with steel and wood made for a very different creative and hacking process. At the same time, I discovered many parallels to software development, embedded hardware, and even open-source philosophies.
Hacks
John Labovitz

* How to write quality software using the magic of tests

Writing quality software is a worthwhile challenge. Learn how to harness the magic of testing to create better software. This presentation will provide you with an overview of the different kinds of tests, show code using different testing tools, and help you decide when and how to apply these to your projects
Cooking
Igal Koshevoy

* Making your information online findable

It's not enough to have a website. You need to have your website (and your business) be findable, and not drive normal people (eg, everyone but you and your web designer) nuts. And you need to make sure that Google has it right. Here's how.
Chemistry
VJ Beauchamp

* Move Your Asana

This yoga session is of benefit to anyone who sits and works on computers a lot. Breathing exercises and physical postures that can be done anytime to help maintain a healthy body and clear mind will be taught. Suggestions will be included for how to modify stretches to protect injuries and provide gentle opening.
Culture
Sherri Koehler

* Non-visual location-based augmented reality using GPS data

Augmented Reality and Geolocation have been hot topics this year, but there has often been a confusion between aesthetics vs. practicality, and fantasy vs. reality. This presentation will highlight the advantages and disadvantages of visual and non-visual augmented reality. We'll tell stories from our experiences building location-aware social networks with custom proximity notification.
Hacks
Aaron Parecki, Amber Case

* Organizing user groups, a panel discussion

User groups are a vital part of the open source community. Learn more about how to start a group, keep it going, and make an existing group better from a panel of experienced user group organizers.
Culture
Igal Koshevoy, Jesse Hallett, Eric Wilhelm, Christie Koehler, gabrielle roth, Audrey Eschright, Sam Keen

* Practical Facebook stalking with Open Source tools

Facebook are full of juicy information about your friends and strangers alike! Learn how to use some simple open source tools and techniques to learn more about them.
Hacks
Paul Fenwick

* Professional JavaScript

JavaScript is a unique and powerful language. Its ubiquity in the browser and its elegant concurrency model make JavaScript an ideal tool in a number of situations. Learn about the best ways to use and to understand this language from a full-time JavaScript professional.
Chemistry
Jesse Hallett

* SuperSpeed me: USB 3.0 Open Source Support

USB 3.0 promises a 10x speedup and better power management than USB 2.0. But how do these devices actually work? Is there open source support for them? Come learn about these fast new devices that are finally hitting the market.
Chemistry
Sarah Sharp

* The $2 computer: ultraconstrained devices do your bidding

"Do you watch television? Is your furnace loud? Do you have $2?" My 7-year-old's marketing suggestions aside, building custom gadgets to improve your life is remarkably simple, and I'll prove it by building something on stage that you can duplicate at home.
Hacks
David Hollingsworth

* The Fine Line Between Creepy and Fun

Social software is kind of a big deal right now. In the open-source spirit of transparency and dissection, let's talk about what makes social technology creepy, what makes it fun, and how to hack things to maximize your desired outcome.
Hacks
Audrey Eschright

* The Open Geo Stack

Location and mapping are making a huge impact on the web and mobile. Open Source is right there. Learn the elements of the geo stack, from mapping APIs to geo databases.
Cooking
Adam DuVander

* The Rise of Hacker Spaces

Leigh will be discussing hacker spaces, and the culture of DIY spaces for making things around the world.
Culture
Leigh Honeywell

* Unlikely tools for pair programming

Co-conspirators Jamey Sharp and Josh Triplett get up to a lot of miscellaneous hacking mischief together. Much of this hacking occurs while staring at the same screen, and tag-teaming the keyboard. Sometimes this happens with the two of them in different places. We'll demo our favorite tools and invite audience contributions to the discussion.
Cooking
Jamey Sharp, Josh Triplett

* When Everything Looks Like A Nail

Markus: Nautilus? I thought you said noodle house! Matt: Wait, wait, I think I see her head!! Markus: Are you sure? Matt: Maybe It's Not Her Head...
Hacks
Markus Roberts, Matt Youell

* Your Internets are Leaking

Using your computer on a public network is like having a conversation on a city bus: people you don't know can hear everything you say. They'll probably be polite and ignore you, but you still might not want to shout out your credit card number. Yet this is what your computer does. All the time. And you don't know it.
Cooking
Reid Beels, Michael Schwern

Open Source Bridge 2009 Birds of a Feather

Favorite sessions for this user

* Code-n-Splode BOF

BOF to go with the "My Grand Experiment" Talk. http://opensourcebridge.org/sessions/115
BoF
gabrielle roth

Open Source Bridge 2009

Favorite sessions for this user

* A Tour of CodePlex

CodePlex is Microsoft’s open source project hosting site. Get an inside look into how the CodePlex team builds the site using 3-week agile deployment cycles to deliver the best feature set for open source development.
Cooking
Sara Ford

* Advanced Git tutorial: Not your average VCS.

Do you know the basics of Git but wonder what all the hype is about? Do you want the ultimate control over your Git history? This tutorial will walk you through the basics of committing changes before diving into the more advanced and "dangerous" Git commands.
Cooking
Sarah Sharp

* An Introduction to Computer Vision

Learn about several computer vision techniques and how to put them together to form an entry-level object classifier.
Chemistry
Matthew Dockrey

* Assholes are killing your project

The strength of your community is the best predictor of your project's long-term viability. What happens when your community is gradually infiltrated by assholes, who infect everyone else with their constant negativity and personal attacks? This talk will teach you about the dramatic impact assholes are having on your organization today and will show you how you can begin to repair it.
Culture
Donnie Berkholz

* Become a better programmer by bridging Ousterhout's Dichotomy

Do you know a dynamic/scripting language like Ruby or Python, but you don't know C? Diving down just a little can make you a better programmer in your preferred language! Scripting languages can teach old C hands a thing or two, too. Delve into the benefits of being a multilingual programmer.
Cooking
Andy Grover

* Bootstrapping Your Open Source Business

A panel on funding your business without VC, based on GitHub's experiences.
Business
Chris Wanstrath, PJ Hyett, Tom Werner

* bzr vs git smack down

Selena loves Git and EmmaJane loves Bazaar. And like all good nerds they've spent a fair amount of time talkin' smack about the other's version control system (VCS). Come see what the fuss is all about!
Cooking
EmmaJane Hogbin, Selena Deckelmann

* Clustering Data -- How to Have Fun in n-Dimensions

The amount of information freely available on the internet from sources like Twitter and Github grows every day. This gives us new opportunities to leverage the collective consciousness. Clustering is a wonderful method for finding useful information in large amounts of data. But it can be an intimidating topic for programmers without a lot of academic background. In this talk I will introduce and explain some practical techniques for clustering real-world data.
Cooking
Jesse Hallett

* Deploying to the Edge from CouchDB

CouchDB can serve standalone applications, which can be shared amongst users, putting the source code (and control) back in their hands.
Hacks
J Chris Anderson

* Effective code sprinting

Code sprints are events where developers quickly complete coding tasks in a collaborative environment. A panel of skilled developers will share their experiences for organizing effective code sprints so you can better participate and organize your own. The panel members have organized and participated in over a hundred sprints (ranging from Django to JRuby) and used sprints as the primary way to develop community-oriented projects (e.g., Calagator). While most of the discussion will be about volunteer-run open source code sprints, many of the ideas will be readily applicable to improving development at your workplace. The panel will offer practical, actionable advice that you can use and answer your questions.
Culture
Igal Koshevoy, Reid Beels, Audrey Eschright

* Faking It Til I Make It: A Woman On The Fringe Of Open Source

As a long-time user of open source software, I've often considered myself an advocate but not necessarily a participant. Over the last year and a half, my own search for technical inspiration has led me full-circle to the realization that I'm an active member of a vibrant community of technical women.
Culture
Maria Webster

* Friday Unconference Kickoff & Scheduling

Welcome to the unconference day.
Culture
Audrey Eschright, Selena Deckelmann, Chris Messina

* Get Off Your Asana and Move!

This is a yoga workshop for anyone who sits and works on computers a lot. You will learn breathing exercises and physical postures that can be done at anytime to help maintain a healthy body and clear mind. Suggestions will be included for how to modify stretches to protect injuries and provide gentle opening.
Culture
Sherri Koehler

* My Grand Experiment: A Portland Women-focused Tech Group.

The idea for Code-n-Splode grew out of the Women in Open Source BOF at OSCON 2007. I'll talk about my original reasons for starting a women-friendly tech group, how the group is evolving, and what I've learned.
Culture
gabrielle roth

* Open Source Press Relations

You have a really cool open source project and everyone should see it, try it, and use it. But ... they don't seem to know about it. How can you make sure your project gets the press coverage it deserves?
Business
Josh Berkus

* Organizing a Volunteer-Driven Open Source Community Project

Panel: Organization, coordination, and implementation of a volunteer community open source project: http://rosecityresource.org (by PDX Drupal UG)
Culture
Sarah Beecroft, Molly Vogt, Joaquin Lippincott, Melissa Anderson, Israel Bayer

* Practical Paper Prototyping

Paper prototyping is the fastest, cheapest way to test your user interface designs. To prove it, in 45 minutes we'll walk through several rounds of prototyping and testing a small application.
Cooking
Randall Hansen

* Project Management Should be Boring!

Many people see project management as the art of trying to please everyone and pleasing no one, while trying not to go too far over deadline and too far over budget. It doesn't have to be that way. Good project management can be so predictable and reliable that it's almost boring. Here's what works in real projects.
Cooking
Chromatic X

* Re-factor Your Brain: Meditation for Geeks

Meditation is the ultimate open source tool. You can do it anywhere and it’s free. It requires only your brain and your body. It’s positive effects are numerous, including increased productivity, better problem-solving and a reduction in overall stress. Learn about long-term effects of mediation on the brain, some meditation techniques and how mediation can help you do your job better.
Culture
Christie Koehler

* Server Sky

Solar powered server and communication arrays in Earth orbit . Manufacturing, costs, environmental benefits, security, maintenance, and survivability will be discussed.
Hacks
Keith Lofstrom

* Speed up that library when you can't C a thing

The problem: you're using a modern dynamic language not known for speed, and you've identified a bottleneck. Write it in C? Does that give you the shakes? There are other language options available...
Chemistry
John Melesky

* Spindle, Mutilate and Metaprogram: How far _can_ you push it before there be dragons?

Maybe the edge isn’t as close as we thought it was. Maybe you can do some really funky things with your language without accidentally summoning eldritch spirits. Or maybe not. The only way to find out is to try it—or, if you are of the more prudent proclivities, to watch someone else try it.
Hacks
Markus Roberts, Matt Youell

* Tangible open source!?

A crash course in applying the principles of open source to the creation of real objects.
Cooking
Dave Rauchwerk

* Thursday Keynotes

Featuring Mayor Sam Adams and Ward Cunningham
Culture
Audrey Eschright, Selena Deckelmann, Ward Cunningham

* Wednesday Welcome and Keynotes

Featuring Amber Case, Cyborg Anthropologist, and Kurt von Finck of Monty Program AB.
Culture
Audrey Eschright, Selena Deckelmann, Amber Case, Kurt von Finck