Danny O'Brien's favorites

Favorite sessions for this user

* Open Source Rockets

PSAS is a student aerospace engineering project at Portland State University. We're building ultra-low-cost, open hardware and open source rockets that feature perhaps the most sophisticated amateur rocket avionics systems out there today.
Hacks
Nathan Bergey, Andrew Greenberg

* (CANCELLED) Getting Started with FPGAs and HDLs

Lots of attention has been given to GPUs for speeding up certain types of computations. While GPUs are very well suited for vector operations, there are other things they are not so well suited for. FPGAs (Field Programmable Gate Arrays) are not used as widely yet, but they offer a much more flexible computing fabric than GPUs. You can implement a GPU in an FPGA, for example, or you could implement your own custom processor optimized for very specialized tasks. The barrier to entry can be high for FPGAs: how does a person with a software development background get started using them? And what about HDLs (Hardware Description Langauges) used to program FPGAs? What's the difference between simulation and synthesis? What kinds of tools are freely available? These are some of the questions that will be addressed in this session.
Cooking
Phil Tomson

* Agile User Experience Design

Agile processes can be very successful for both clients and developers, but the rapid pace and the lack of detailed long-term plans can make it difficult to design and build high quality user experiences. We'll talk about good ways to do that.
Cooking
Randall Hansen

* Being a Catalyst in Communities - The science behind the open source way

How does Red Hat have wild success with Fedora and other FLOSS projects? By following a method firmly rooted in humanism, practice, and science. Learn in this session how to be an effective catalyst in communities of users, contributors, and businesses.
Culture
Karsten Wade

* Building A Mesh Network Wireless Temperature Sensor

The problem: My HVAC system is not balanced. Easy but boring solution: Hire a qualified contractor to fix it. More interesting solution: Use knowledge from dusty undergrad degree in electronics to cobble together some simple wireless temperature sensors using XBee modules and distribute them around the house. Then use Java programming knowledge to build up a monitoring system using open source software. Attempt to use readings from temperature sensors to figure out what's going on and fix it. This presentation will delve into the hardware and software aspects of the system, although with more emphasis on the software and the role that packages such as Apache Felix and Apache Mina play in the system.
Hacks
Michael Pigg

* Fixing SSL security: Supplementing the certificate authority model

The most common way of using SSL/TLS encryption relies on a public-key infrastructure that puts near-absolute trust in a large number of entities around the world, any one of which could accidentally or deliberately empower anyone to impersonate any site or service and spy on all of our communications. We've seen that these certificate authorities can make mistakes. We need new mechanisms to meaningfully double-check that they're doing the right thing.
Hacks
Seth Schoen

* Hacking Space Exploration

From creating remote-sensing CubeSats to analyzing aerogel: how the public is hacking into open source space exploration.
Culture
Ariel Waldman

* How to write quality software using the magic of tests

Writing quality software is a worthwhile challenge. Learn how to harness the magic of testing to create better software. This presentation will provide you with an overview of the different kinds of tests, show code using different testing tools, and help you decide when and how to apply these to your projects
Cooking
Igal Koshevoy

* HyperCard 2010: Why Johnny Can't Code (and What We Can Do About It)

Thomas Jefferson envisioned a nation of self-sufficient citizen farmers; programmers like Alan Kay and Bill Atkinson tried to help us code as easily as we might hang a poster on the wall. What happened to the HyperCard ideal? Have we settled for consumption over creation? I will explore the question through a case study, surveying the state of citizen programming in 2010 — from CouchApps to Shoes to plain-jane HTML5+JS to HyperCard 2.4 — and try to convince all comers that realizing the dream of the citizen coder is vital to continuing the ideals of open source.
Culture
Devin Chalmers

* import rdma: Zero-copy networking with RDMA and Python

Every time your server sends or receives a packet, it copies it to (or from) a temporary kernel buffer. What an incredible waste of CPU and memory bandwidth! RDMA solves this, at a huge complexity cost. This talk will cover what happens when a dynamic language meets a direct-memory-placement protocol.
Hacks
Andy Grover

* libcloud: a unified interface into the cloud

What is possible when you can consume servers on various hosting providers with nothing more than a python script? This talk will discuss libcloud, an Apache Incubator project dedicated to building standard interfaces into the cloud.
Cooking
Alex Polvi

* Open Source and the Open Social Web

Open Source software has been instrumental in the development of every revolutionary communications technology on the Internet. The Open social Web is no different.
Chemistry
Evan Prodromou

* Sphinx - the ultimate tool for documenting your software project

Open source software projects can succeed or fail based on their documentation. Thanks to Sphinx, open source developers now have a "documentation framework" that provides convenient indexing and automatic syntax highlighting, integrates your documentation with your code, and can automatically generate a beautiful manual as a PDF document.
Cooking
Nate Aune

* The $2 computer: ultraconstrained devices do your bidding

"Do you watch television? Is your furnace loud? Do you have $2?" My 7-year-old's marketing suggestions aside, building custom gadgets to improve your life is remarkably simple, and I'll prove it by building something on stage that you can duplicate at home.
Hacks
David Hollingsworth

* The Return of Command-Line Kung Fu

A follow-on to last year's highly popular presentation, Hal Pomeranz returns with another super-size helping of command-line madness!
Cooking
Hal Pomeranz

* The Story of Spaz: How to Give Away Everything, Make No Money, and Still Win

What motivates us as developers? How do we define success? Throughout the development of Spaz, we've learned a lot about what works, what doesn't, and what really matters. Come to hear the story, and participate in the discussion of how we define success in open source.
Business
Edward Finkler

* Unlikely tools for pair programming

Co-conspirators Jamey Sharp and Josh Triplett get up to a lot of miscellaneous hacking mischief together. Much of this hacking occurs while staring at the same screen, and tag-teaming the keyboard. Sometimes this happens with the two of them in different places. We'll demo our favorite tools and invite audience contributions to the discussion.
Cooking
Jamey Sharp, Josh Triplett

Favorite proposals for this user

* "Thoughtcrime Experiments": CC/FLOSS Lessons From A DIY Sci-Fi Anthology

Last year, two FLOSS enthusiasts edited a Creative Commons-licensed anthology of original fantasy and science fiction stories and art. We did it to give back, to give readers more choices, and because documenting and sharing are in our blood. Here's how we published a great anthology, why, and how you can do it too.
Culture 2010-03-23 17:48:46 +0000
Sumana Harihareswara

* 'But It's Broken!' Advice for First-Time FOSS Project Patch Submitters

You've found a critical error in a widely-used FOSS system, you write a great fix, you submit it... and it is bounced, and you think the reason is lame. What to do? We'll guide you through the political minefield that is submitting your first patch to a FOSS project.
Culture 2010-03-30 06:44:51 +0000
Christophe Pettus, Josh Berkus

* Gerrit what is it? can I try it out?

This talk will be about what Gerrit is, how to set up a test Gerrit in a VBox, how it works, and how it could grow on you after you use it a bit.
Cooking 2010-03-14 01:44:56 +0000
mark gross

* Should there be a free software app store?

Since free software "is a matter of liberty, not price", developers and distributions are allowed to ask users to pay for free software (though most users can easily choose not to). Musicians like Radiohead have experimented with asking, but not requiring, users to pay for music (by choosing their own price, which could be $0). What would happen if we did this for free software?
Business 2010-03-26 00:53:46 +0000
Seth Schoen

* Test Driven Database Development

Learn how to apply the principals of test-driven development to developing a database schema.
Cooking 2010-03-21 01:02:05 +0000
David Wheeler

* The Complex Ethics of Piracy

The Complex Ethics of Piracy This talk aims to replace the "piracy is good" vs "piracy is theft" debate with a more nuanced understanding. It will investigate when piracy is selfish; when it is civil disobedience; whether it is ever constructive for cultural industries, or whether it is ever, as copyright holders argue, "theft". I will conclude that each of these things is sometimes true about piracy, and that simple views are inadequate for understanding the ethical dimension of copyright infringement. Both pirates and copyright industries need to develop more subtle understandings of the morality of file sharing.
Culture 2010-03-30 04:24:31 +0000
Peter Eckersley

* WebNumbr - Graph anything on the web

Graphs are awesome. Everyone can find graphs for stocks and gas prices, and maybe even Amazon prices if you're good. But how about your twitter list counts, P1 bug reports, server connection count, or flickr pictures per millisecond? Come see a cool tool that will revolutionize your graphing life.
Hacks 2010-02-24 21:02:56 +0000
Paul Tarjan

* Write a Linux Device Driver: Flipping bits, blinking lights and crashing Kernels

Curious what makes your hardware tick? Itching to crash your system in a indiviualized way? Then you should try your hand at writing a device driver for Linux.
Chemistry 2010-03-26 05:31:26 +0000
Brandon Philips