Sumana Harihareswara's favorites

Open Source Bridge 2014

Favorite sessions for this user

* Airplanes : Sailboats :: Mobile : Desktop

What if the way that airplanes were designed and how it improved sailing had some deep lessons around the future of user experience? Sailboats improved significantly after the discovery of flight, and mobile design is improving a great deal of user experience as well. How can we think about applying these lessons? What's still missing?
Culture
Amye Scavarda

* Building a Translucent Mobile Crypto Currency with Couchbase Lite JSON Sync

Web of Trust with JSON Sync
Hacks
J Chris Anderson

* Confessions of a DBA: worst and best things I've done in production

In the past 15 years, I've done some pretty horrendous things around the M in LAMP. I will balance this with good things I've done too.
Cooking
Emily Slocombe

* Data, Privacy, & Trust in Open Source: 10 Lessons from Wikipedia

Few people today are not concerned with the way data is used to enhance or subvert individual privacy. This is especially true on the Web, where open source technologies are behind much of what we interact with and use on a daily basis. As the most fundamental aspects of our lives become networked -- social relationships, work, finance, and even how we get our food -- how can we make sure that open source technologies foster a sense of trust with users, protect their privacy, and still give data scientists the tools they need to gain insight?
Culture
Steven Walling

* Deconstructing Open Source Contributions

Everyone wants to make contributing to open source projects more accessible and fun. But how do we do that? One way is to analyze past contributions to identify potential obstacles and opportunities for intervention and support. This workshop will use our own experiences as contributors to explore how the process works, using a simple but effective reflective activity.
Culture
Shauna Gordon-McKeon

* Distributed Agile Development or: How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love Remoties

This is the story of how the mobile web engineering team at the Wikimedia Foundation became an extremely high-functioning and successful agile team: by embracing - rather than shying away from - a distributed model. This talk will explore the agile team's journey and how we cope with the inherent tension of remoteness and the agile principle, 'The most efficient and effective method of conveying information to and within a development team is face-to-face conversation'.
Culture
Arthur Richards

* Don't Let Your Tests Flake Out

The build's red with a test failure. You re-run the tests and suddenly all is well. What's going on?
Cooking
Jason Clark

* Explicit Invitations: Passion is Not Enough for True Diversity

Open Source suffers from a lack of diversity. Underrepresented populations, for systemic reasons, might never show up unless Open Source communities 'hack' themselves through explicit invitation & removing barriers to participation. Mozilla is funding two pilot studies designed to explicitly reach out to underrepresented groups in open source today. Seeking people who like to solve problems and then engaging them in a 6 week, full time accelerator program we hope to explore the question: Can we seed our communities by hacking the social/cultural/systemic issues in order to gain technical contributions from a more diverse set of minds and give to participants an experience in tech that might have long term benefits to them?
Hacks
Lukas Blakk

* Feminist Point of View: Lessons From Running the Geek Feminism Wiki

The Geek Feminism wiki is one of the central resources for feminist activism in geek communities ranging from open source software to science fiction fandom. Learn how the GF wiki started, how it's run, and what we've learned about doing activism the wiki way.
Culture
Alex Bayley

* Freedom, security and the cloud

Cloud hosting is cheap. Cloud hosting is easy. What compromises are you making when you deploy to the cloud, both in terms of your security and in terms of your dependency on proprietary software?
Chemistry
Matthew Garrett

* From navel gazing to ass kicking: Building leadership in the journalism code community

Amidst all the hand wringing surrounding the "future of journalism," developers, designers, and data geeks working in newsrooms are building projects and tools that engage readers and ripple across the web. We'll discuss ways this community welcomes, supports, and promotes new members and leaders.
Culture
Erika Owens

* Get more contributors! Lessons from the Drupal Ladder.

A small contributor pool is a recipe for burnout and can harm or hold back your project. Learn how offering a structured approach for step-by-step skill-building can combat imposter syndrome and build community, thereby increasing the number and diversity of your project's contributors.
Culture
Rhys Fureigh

* How to Run 100 User Tests in Two Days

Have you ever dreamed of running a vast quantity of user tests in a very short amount of time? Let me show you how I pulled this off at two conferences.
Hacks
Daniel Sauble

* Make your wireless router route (or anything else) the way you want it to, with OpenWrt.

How to build an OpenWrt image from source to do just what you want it to on your suitably chosen hardware.
Cooking
Russell Senior

* Making Your Privacy Software Usable

Privacy enhancing technologies (PETs), like onion routing, PGP, and OTR often achieve a high level of security, but user experience (UX) built on top of the protocols is often a development afterthought. Without a concerted effort to examine how the system is used, people accidentally compromise their data or never attempt to use PETs. This talk will show you PET design done right and wrong through the lens of standard UX evaluation techniques. Our goal is to enable you to incorporate UX principles into your hacking from day 0.
Chemistry
Jen Davidson, Sean McGregor

* My Journey into Open Source Design

Becoming a contributing designer on an open source project is often tougher than contributing code. The pathways to designing for open source projects are often unclear. Using my own experience joining the WordPress project, I'll share how I think open source projects can make it easier for designers to contribute their skills.
Cooking
Mel Choyce

* Open source software could save libraries! Maybe!

There are opportunities for open source to help save the day for libraries, ending many of librarians' and library users' woes.
Business
Coral Sheldon-Hess

* Open Sourcing Mental Illness: Ending The Stigma

An open, honest discussion of mental illness from the perspective of a web developer. We can learn to survive, cope, and thrive.
Culture
Ed Finkler

* Stop Crying in the Bathroom and Start Your Own Business

The tech industry has a 'diversity problem' and companies are courting women, people of color and other marginalized people as the pressure mounts to hire someone besides 24-year-old cis, straight white male programmers. However, for many marginalized people, working in startups, agencies, and large tech companies can be a miserable, demoralizing experience that literally results in crying in the bathroom. There's more to life than startups. Come hear ideas for making your own path in the tech industry, without compromising your dignity or your mental health.
Business
Kronda Adair

* Tales from the Trenches: Battling Browser Bugs for "Fun" and (Non-)Profit

Web development used to be HARD. You basically had to rewrite your code for every new browser you wanted to support. But with modern browsers and libraries like jQuery, those dark days are over. Or are they? We pushed the limits of what the web can do while building VisualEditor (the new editor for Wikipedia) and found plenty of hilarious, insane, amazing and horrifying bugs in browsers even in 2014. All we needed to do was poke around in some unusual places.
Hacks
Roan Kattouw

* Unicode Beyond Just Characters: Localization with the CLDR

Unicode is much more than just characters. The Unicode Consortium defines open standards for collating, parsing, and formatting data in much of the world’s languages. The Common Locale Data Repository (CLDR) is the largest standard repository of locale data along with specifications for its use and is a powerful resource for software localization.
Cooking
Nick Patch

* When Many Eyes Fail You: Tales from Security Standards and Open Source

It's often said that "given many eyes, all bugs are shallow" and open source proponents love to list this as a reason that open source is more secure than its closed-source relatives. While that makes a nice sound bite, the reality of security with many eyeballs doesn't fit so nicely into a tweet. This talk will explore some of the things that surprised me in going from academic security research to industry security research in open source and open standards.
Culture
Terri Oda

Favorite proposals for this user

* Caching and Tuning fun for high scalability

What makes you site capable of scaling from 5 to 5 million visitors/day without rebuilding it from scratch ? Follow this step-by-step approach through various caching techniques, ways to improve or replace your web stack and ways to tune your setup for higher backend and frontend scalability.
Cooking 2014-03-23 15:35:59 +0000
Wim Godden

* Apprenticeships: I implore you!

Talk Outline: My background pre-programming Attending gSchool (6 month Ruby on Rails program), hired as an apprentice Why we need apprenticeships What senior developers and teams get out of apprenticeships What you can do / My suggestions for working with apprentices
Culture 2014-03-12 20:14:09 +0000
Jennifer Eliuk

* Building a Web App With Scala, Spray, Slick, and AngularJS

This is a tutorial that will show you how to build a simple but completely functional web app from the UI through to the database. We will use AngularJS to build a single page application (SPA) as the UI. On the server side we will use Spray (and Scala) to build RESTful web services for the font end. We will finally connect the Spray services to a database using Slick.
Cooking 2014-03-11 12:33:03 +0000
Michael Pigg

* Deploy a highly available message bus with ActiveMQ and Zookeeper

How to deploy ActiveMQ and Zookeeper using LevelDB in a Master/Slave/Slave global configuration.
Cooking 2014-04-03 04:49:35 +0000
Michael Ewan

* Hacking the DevOps Talent Pipeline

The Open Source Lab at Oregon State University constantly struggles to produce enough students to fulfill companies' recruiting demands. As part of our recent transition into the school of computer science at OSU, we've started a DevOps training program. We're teaching open source systems administration and software development skills to all interested students, regardless of experience level. This talk will discuss what we've done, our results, and what you can learn from our experiences.
Cooking 2014-04-05 04:58:52 +0000
E. Dunham, Dean Johnson

* Python Performance Profiling: The Guts And The Glory

Your Python program is too slow, and you need to optimize it. Where do you start? With the right tools, you can optimize your code where it counts. We’ll explore the guts of the Python profiler “Yappi” to understand its features and limitations. We’ll learn how to find the maximum performance wins with minimum effort.
Chemistry 2014-03-28 23:03:30 +0000
A. Jesse Jiryu Davis

* RESTful Micro-service communication over AMQP

In the last several years, the web application has evolved from “monolith” to collection of APIs. In this presentation, we discuss the advantages, the difficulties, and some of the technologies involved in getting APIs to talk with each other successfully.
Cooking 2014-03-17 18:26:54 +0000
Serge Domkowski

* Rethinking the Single Page Web Application

We were promised a glorious future with RESTful APIs, clients with lighting fast JavaScript engines, and an end to sending UI from the server. Now your project is late, the technical debt is piling up, and you're thinking that hey, Rails wasn't awful. Let's talk about when it's a good idea to build a single page, client side app, and when it's not. I'll be drawing from my experience building a single-app to manage an enterprise software as a service product. Before you jumped into Backbone, Ember, or Angular, you needed to think through the APIs you have, and still had to build. You need to look at the interactions in your UI. You need to figure out where and how your users will access the application.
Cooking 2014-04-11 08:57:43 +0000
Bill Humphries

* Scaling Open Source Outreach

In 2013, we ran a dozen open source outreach events at college campuses and reached hundreds of students, but for every event we ran there were more invitations we didn't have the resources to accept. In 2014, we're focused on scaling our workshops that so that community organizers everywhere can use our materials and welcome more people into open source. In this talk, we'll discuss what works and what doesn't when it comes to scaling community outreach.
Culture 2014-04-04 19:39:12 +0000
Shauna Gordon-McKeon

* Sharing is caring: friends, manage your resources!

Lots of modern languages help us out with automatic memory management, but for other types of resources, we're left in charge. I'll talk about some of the problems that can come out of poorly managing resources like files and database connections, and show you a few of the tools that language designers have given us to make this easier.
Chemistry 2014-04-05 04:40:05 +0000
Kamal Marhubi

* Systems programming as a swiss army knife

Why understanding some systems programming basics will make you a better developer.
Cooking 2014-03-28 03:12:24 +0000
Julia Evans

* Technically Pretty

Presenting as both technical and professionally-female is a difficult tightrope to walk. Join us for this talk on how to work your own style into something the suits will respect.
Business 2014-03-21 05:44:44 +0000
H. Waterhouse

* What the WITH? Care and feeding of CTEs

Have you tried some recursion in your SQL? In this session, we will go over the concept of Common Table Expressions (CTE), also known as WITH queries. We will explore syntax, features, and use cases for this powerful SQL construct.
Cooking 2014-04-02 21:36:11 +0000
Michael Alan Brewer

* You and web APIs: zero to getting somewhere in 45 min

I went from asking "web APIs are another way to interact with a website, right?" to finishing up a proposal to evaluate and improve MediaWiki web API client libraries in just over a week. Learn from my experience! I'll tell you why you might want to use web APIs, bring you over the stumbling blocks and thickets of documentation that frustrated me, and tell you what makes a good web API client library and why you want to use one. After this talk, you'll know enough about web APIs to ask good questions about them and explore them on your own.
Chemistry 2014-04-05 05:39:07 +0000
Frances Hocutt

* You can be a kernel hacker

Writing operating systems sounds like it's only for wizards, but it turns out that operating systems are written by humans like you and me. I'm going to tell you what a kernel is and why you should care. Then we'll talk about a few concrete ways to get started with kernel hacking, ranging from the super-easy to the terrifyingly difficult.
Chemistry 2014-03-06 17:42:15 +0000
Julia Evans

Open Source Bridge 2013

Favorite sessions for this user

* !done - Hacking IRC Bots for Distributed Teams

When our company was acquired we needed a way to see everything that was done each day all in one place. Teams were using different methods to do this: standups, written reports, emails and meetings. Nothing stuck. Done reports introduces a simple IRC command: !done. Team members say !done and what they just did. These !dones are put into a daily report. !done becomes a part of everyday at work, not a strained task that’s easily forgotten.
Culture
Amber Case, Aaron Parecki

* "Give me money" or "join me in doing this great thing"? A workshop on asking for donations from individuals

If you care about a project or cause, but fear adding individual fundraising to your business plan, come to this long-form workshop. By the end, you will enthusiastically seek out opportunities to ask for money and know how to build a strong community of support over time.
Business
Kellie Brownell

* Bugs, bugs, bugs!

Bugmasters from Wikimedia, Mozilla, and GNOME argue entertainingly about bug management. We shall reveal our best Bugzilla hacks as well as waxing philosophical about open source project developer communities!
Culture
Liz Henry, Andre Klapper

* Citizenship Online: Open Source Politics

Online deliberation refers to applications which help communities make decisions. This varies from Exploratory deliberation, like Amazon reviews, where an individual makes a decision by consulting their community, to very structured Decision Making deliberations where a community needs to forge a single legally and logically defensible decision.
Culture
Ele Munjeli

* Clone A Git Together Into Your Town

Git is used everywhere, but few structured communities or groups exist. Learn about the PDX Git Together and how to clone this community model into your town.
Culture
Duke Leto

* Database Change Management

Survey of Open Source Java based tools for managing database changes with emphasis on automation using dbdeploy, Flyway, and Liquibase.
Cooking
Todd Lisonbee

* debugging without borders

Debuggers are great when you have intimate access to your codebase, server, and network. Sometimes, all you have is a web browser and some intuition, and you still have a problem to solve. What then?
Cooking
chris mccraw

* Dirty Tricks of Computer Hardware: What You Don't Know Will (Probably Not) Kill You

Ever wonder what you don't know about how your computer hardware really works? Do you tire of lying to your relatives that "gremlins" are the cause of intermittent data loss and blue screens, and not just a car from the 1970s? Let's take a journey into the wonderful world of wonky hardware and find out what can be done about it!
Chemistry
Darrick Wong

* Diversity in open source: What's changed in 2012 and 2013

A few stories we will cover: * 20% women attendees at PyCon US 2013 * 85% of JSConf attendees donated to women in open tech/culture * The success of Black Girls Code * Conferences with 100% white male speakers are now called out for not trying hard enough to find good speakers * Mozilla's adoption of community guidelines that prevent advocacy of discrimination on Planet Mozilla and other Mozilla forums * The rapid growth of PyLadies
Culture
Valerie Aurora, Sumana Harihareswara, Ashe Dryden, Liz Henry, Asheesh Laroia

* Failure and Wikipedia: how encyclopedias work

This talk is about my experience with promoting Wikipedia in Indian languages, OpenGLAM projects in India and the problems I've encountered. I also want to draw parallels to how the encyclopedia project itself, especially online works on notions of rough consensus, thereby articulating a specific political position for the community and reflecting a world view through the knowledge they produce.
Culture
noopur raval

* Firefox Bug Rodeo!

Hands-on Bugzilla wrassling, Firefox busting, barrel riding showdown. Enter the dazzling gladiatorial arena of BUG TRIAGE with MOZILLA! We will make bugzilla.mozilla.org accounts, practice reading and understanding bug reports, discuss why and how to investigate and add information to bugs, explore searches and reports, and feel the glorious feeling of contributing to open access to information and awesome browsers for all!
Cooking
Liz Henry

* FiveUI: Open-source UX tests for the common good

Testing User Interfaces is hard! FiveUI [1] is here to help. While FiveUI happens to provide a handy framework for doing headless and interactive UI testing; it is really intended for sharing tests and sharing a framework for executing them. FiveUI consists of a browser extension (for Firefox and Google Chrome), a headless batch system, and a set of UI consistency guidelines. The guidelines are written in JSON and Javascript such that they remain readable and understandable to human developers, without being tied to a specific application. The guidelines can be checked on an individual web page by hand using the browser extensions, or on an entire website using the headless system. [1] http://galoisinc.github.com/FiveUI/
Cooking
Benjamin Jones, Rogan Creswick

* How My Kids Are Learning to Program By Talking

My children have patiently tolerated a number of teach-STEM-quick schemes their dad has brought home. They've taught robots to dance, created simple animations using Scratch, and, quite frankly, made a lot of poop jokes. What's missing from these programming tools was storytelling. The ones we tried focused either on easy interactivity or expressive power. If only there were a way to combine the two... oh, wait, there was—46 years ago!
Culture
Ian Dees

* It's OK to be Average

Open Source communities are often full of "the one who invented ___" people. They've written RFCs, gotten patents, published software that's already installed on every computer you'll ever buy. It can be kind of intimidating. But there's room for more than that--and welcoming more people can improve your project exponentially!
Culture
Noirin Plunkett

* Just Don't Lick the Cookie: an open discussion about organizational dysfunction

When someone claims a task and then doesn't do anything with it, we call that "licking the cookie." Nobody in their right mind would pick up and eat the licked cookie or finish the project. In this session well talk about common forms of organizational dysfunction, and then facilitate a group discussion about working around, over, under or through organizational dysfunctions you've encountered.
Culture
Kellie Brownell, Sumana Harihareswara

* Kicking Impostor Syndrome In The Head

Impostor syndrome -- the persistent belief that any minute everyone around you is going to figure out you're not at all qualified -- happens to a majority of the tech industry; nobody talks about it, because nobody wants to be the first to admit it. This talk confronts that feeling head-on, and addresses ways to readjust your perceptions of your accomplishments to accurately reflect reality.
Culture
Denise Paolucci

* Labor, ethics and computing

An exploration of labor and ethics from various points in the life of a computer -- from the day-to-day software programming and hardware inside the computer down to the materials used in various components. Includes the implications for open source hardware and software as well as possible future solutions.
Chemistry
Cameron Adamez

* Leveling up in DevOps: the Art of Bad Shell Scripts

What are the core differences in a DevOps intern, a beginner DevOpsian, and a senior DevOpsian?
Culture
Emily Slocombe

* Library of the future: building the Multnomah County Library website

The Multnomah County Library website has combined Drupal, Solr Search, Nginx, Varnish and a host of other technologies to build a highly scalable web infrastructure. The site takes advantage of responsive design techniques to provide patrons—the people who check out the books—with an impressive mobile experience.
Cooking
Joshua Mitchell

* Low-Friction Personal Data Collection

Have you ever wanted to track your movements, sleep, what you eat, who you spend time with, and all sorts of other personal data? In this talk I'll describe the tools I've been able to successfully use to track aspects of my life.
Cooking
Aaron Parecki

* Metrics - What's your code actually doing?

Metrics tell us what our code and our systems are doing and how well they are performing. Proper instrumentation of our systems allows developers and sysadmins to have a better understanding of how code works in production settings.
Cooking
James Burkhart

* Morning Keynote: Ashe Dryden

It's been scientifically proven that more diverse communities and workplaces create better products and the solutions to difficult problems are more complete and diverse themselves. Companies are struggling to find adequate talent. So why do we see so few women, people of color, and LGBTQ people at our events and on the about pages of our websites? Even more curiously, why do 60% of women leave the tech industry within 10 years? Why are fewer women choosing to pursue computer science and related degrees than ever before? Why have stories of active discouragement, dismissal, harassment, or worse become regular news?
Culture
Ashe Dryden

* My First Year of Pull Requests

Open source folks are passionate about the tools they make and want others to get involved. Yet, in the past year that I've been developing software full time, I've seen a wide variety of responses from maintainers. On one hand, I've been inspired by the Travis-CI maintainer who followed up with my bug report over several weeks, on the other hand, my pull request to JDBC has lain fallow.
Culture
Fiona Tay

* Negotiation: Because You're Worth It

There's only one person who wins when you don't negotiate, and it's not you. But, as any logician will tell you, that doesn't tell us about what happens when you do negotiate. I'm here to help!
Business
Noirin Plunkett

* Open Sourcing Depression

In the spirit of open source, I'd like to shine a spotlight on depression. Not because it's easy, but because it's important. Mental illness affects many of us, but the stigma attached to it dissuades most people from talking about it openly. That's not how we make progress. With this talk, I want to do my part.
Culture
Edward Finkler

* Product Management in the Open (Source) - community and direction

Product Management is a generally well defined discipline inside large corporate organizations. But how does it work in the open source world? Do we need it? How does product consensus happen in open source?
Business
Larissa Shapiro

* Quantitative community management

In this talk, you will learn the state of the art in community measurement, common mistakes made in surveying, and how to actively use data to improve activity within a project.
Culture
Asheesh Laroia

* Quick Cure for the Shame of Untested Software

As the founder of a company focused on software testing, I speak often to developers who admit in private: "Yes, testing is important... but we don't test." Reasons vary, but the basic problem is that testing is seen as too difficult and time-consuming with no apparent value for the effort. In this talk I hope to convince you that this problem is a false dilemma and show you how to get started testing software quickly and easily.
Cooking
Daniel Nichter

* Remote Pair Programming

Remote Pair Programming: my setup, some advice, and a live demo^H^H stress test
Cooking
Sam Livingston-Gray

* Search-first writing for non-writers

Search-first writing makes you think about the structure of your document and product as a series of topics, instead of a big book. The days of linear documentation are over, or at least numbered. Users are much more likely to come to documentation through searches. As an open source creator, you may not have a writer to help you out with this, so how can you maximize their return on your minimal investment?
Cooking
Heidi Waterhouse

* Switching Teams: Moving an Application from MySQL to PostgreSQL

The true life story of switching database backends in our application.
Hacks
Julie Baumler

* The "Oh Shit" Graph: What We Can Learn From Wikipedia's Editor Decline Trend

Wikipedia and the other Wikimedia projects have been hemorrhaging editors for the past five years. We're going to talk about the reasons why, how they can affect other projects, and what you can do to prevent it in yours.
Chemistry
Brandon Harris

* The Care and Feeding of Volunteers: Lessons from Non-Profits and OSS

Volunteers are the lifeblood of OSS projects. From behemoths like the Linux Foundation to every little project on SourceForge, volunteers keep things moving forward. Retaining happy and motivated volunteers is a crucial step in creating a healthy organization. In this talk, I will discuss the whys and wherefors of encouraging and directing your volunteers in the context of both traditional non-profits and OSS projects.
Culture
Katherine Toomajian

* Training the trainers

This long session is a tutorial, with exercises, on how to run welcoming, effective outreach events targeted at bringing newcomers into your communities.
Cooking
Asheesh Laroia

* Using Secure Boot for the powers of good

Secure Boot is a technology for limiting the files that computers will boot. Used wrongly, it restricts user freedom and turns computers into appliances. How can we use it for real improvements in security without losing the ideals of general purpose computing?
Chemistry
Matthew Garrett

* Zero to root in 12 months / How We Mentor “Rock Star” Students

The OSU Open Source Lab (OSUOSL) and PSU Computer Action Team (theCAT) provides an amazing program for undergraduate students to learn about system administration. Many of our students have moved on and created their own successful startups and have changed the landscape of open source themselves. This session will cover how OSUOSL and theCAT mentor our students and create rock stars in the industry.
Culture
William Van Hevelingen, Kenneth Lett, Lance Albertson, Spencer Krum

Favorite proposals for this user

* Agile Crafting

Estimating the time a project will take is pretty much the hardest thing in software, and I don't think that's any different for any other crafting deliverable. Of course, sometimes we have done something so often that we KNOW it takes 50 minutes to make a batch of raspberry jam, but that's not the same as estimation. So if we can't rely on our own estimation, or that of others, what can we do? We can timebox from the other direction. Instead of trying to figure out how long something will take, we can decide how long we have to spend on it. After all, you are the boss of your creative experiences. If you don't deliver on time, it's disappointing, but probably not the end of your career.
Hacks 2013-03-01 20:20:52 +0000
Heidi Waterhouse

* Democratization of infrastructure: Monitoring with nagios and graphite

Git is cool. Configuration is code. The simplicity of a monitoring check or metrics collector enables junior system administrators to learn in small, contained parts. Jr. admins can go from not knowing what monitoring is to having a check in production in a manner of hours.
Culture 2013-03-10 05:07:40 +0000
Spencer Krum, William Van Hevelingen

* Digital Nomad: How to stay connected anywhere in the world

For some of us staying connected to the internet is an imperative, and while traveling to foreign lands it can sometimes be difficult to remain connected. Let me share with you some of the techniques that I've discovered for remaining connected while abroad.
Cooking 2013-03-10 04:48:51 +0000
Benjamin Kero

* Evaluating open source GIS techniques for addressing database, analysis and visualization aspects of spatiotemporal information

Most GIS were not specifically designed to manage dynamic spatiotemporal data. Spatiotemporal mapping is the representation of changes in geographical phenomena. By identifying the characteristics of the spatial, temporal and attributional dimensions, we evaluate OSGIS techniques for data storage, retrieval, pattern analysis and visualization.
Hacks 2013-01-21 04:10:31 +0000
Lynnae Sutton

* Evangelism and community outreach in the 1st century

How a local meetup with 13 participants spread across their known World in a few years, with little budget and gigantic enemies. Beyond miracles and beliefs: let’s look at the tactics and procedures that made the first Christians successful. A historical view of Acts of the Apostles for free software promoters and community managers.
Culture 2013-03-08 07:25:29 +0000
Quim Gil

* Getting Faster: 5 People Who Sped Up Our World

Everywhere we look our world is speeding up. We have "fast food" and "speed dating". In technology we talk of "sprints", and "continuous deployment". But the search for speed is not a new one and has been going on for centuries. Spanning 300 years we'll discuss 5 people who have spent their lives making things faster and learn how we can apply these concepts to the work we're doing today.
Culture 2013-03-23 18:56:20 +0000
Alex Kroman

* Gitolite: Git on the server

Gitolite is next generation git server software. In this talk you'll learn about basic setup and advanced configuration. Awesome things such as branch-specific access controls, ldap/puppet integration, git hook madness and integration with redmine.
Cooking 2013-03-19 02:15:31 +0000
Spencer Krum

* Guerrilla Usability Toolkit

In the age of Agile, it's important for teams to get quick feedback on designs to keep sprints moving, but Omnigraffle wireframes are no match for the rich interactions of the modern web. This represents an opportunity for smart developers to create prototypes with working functionality that can be rapidly tested and changed based on incoming data from teammates and users.
Hacks 2013-03-09 00:00:00 +0000
Chris Watson, Alex Cone

* How to (Almost) Kill a Successful Project and then Bring It Back to Life: Lessons Learned from the Xen Project

In the decade the Xen Project has been in existence, it has seen great success. It also almost collapsed because of certain community and business decisions. We will deliver lessons learned so that other projects can avoid these pitfalls.
Culture 2013-03-09 21:18:19 +0000
Russell Pavlicek

* How We Mentor “Rock Star” Students at the OSUOSL

Over the past ten years the OSU Open Source Lab (OSUOSL) has provided an amazing program for undergraduate students. Many of our students have moved on and created their own successful startups and have changed the landscape of open source themselves. This session will cover how we mentor our students and create rock stars in the industry.
Culture 2013-03-11 00:35:56 +0000
Lance Albertson, Kenneth Lett

* Old-school testing that is relevant today

What is an equivalence class? Imagine that you have a function that takes an integer parameter between 1 and 12. The integers from 2 to 11 are in the same class; you probably don't need to test more than one of them. 1 and 12 are boundary values, but they're at opposite ends so you should probably test both. 0 and 13 and negative integers all belong to the same class, "out of range". What other classes might be relevant when testing this function?
Culture 2013-03-09 23:02:43 +0000
Kurt Sussman

* Open Source and Feelings: Maintenance as Empathy Work

"Maintainers shouldn't be passive, otherwise the project can lack vision, and being aggressive risks alienating new contributors. An assertive maintainer can make the project fun for contributors while retaining a sense of purpose and direction."
Culture 2013-03-10 00:40:40 +0000
Strand McCutchen

* Open Source Mentor-ship

Contributing to an open source project goes beyond coding. A programmer has to adapt the processes, tools and culture of the project. This adaption can prove to be a challenge and makes a number of people shy off from contributing. Having someone to hold your hand makes the adaption very smooth!
Culture 2013-03-20 12:22:23 +0000
Martha Chumo

* Opposing Authority in Open Source

In this talk I'll showcase insights we can garner from left wing anti-establishment movements such as community radio stations, unions and cooperatives and how you can use those techniques to grow, scale and manage open source communities, while still dismantling the authority.
Culture 2013-03-08 22:08:57 +0000
Francesca Krihely

* Put the "Ops" in "Dev": What Developers Need to Know About DevOps

With so many tools to insulate us, its difficult to see that luxury can come with hidden costs. Those hidden costs may include security, performance, scalability and maintainability. Startups may let developers lay down the infrastructure which can create some major headaches down the road if done incorrectly.
Culture 2013-03-11 00:24:12 +0000
Lance Albertson, Kenneth Lett, Justin Dugger, Rudy Grigar

* Scribunto: Why and how MediaWiki integrated Lua for templating

The Scribunto ("They shall write") extension for MediaWiki allows wiki users to write Lua code to process and display text and data in articles. Learn why Wikimedia chose Lua, how it is integrated into our PHP-based web app, and what results have been seen since the deployment in March.
Chemistry 2013-03-21 16:08:45 +0000
Brad Jorsch

* The intersection of software and education (with discussion)

How do you build a better engineer? What tools and approaches are out there today? Where might we be going in the future? Presentation then discussion.
Culture 2013-03-22 03:50:41 +0000
Colin Dabritz

* Zero to root in 12 months: Training and Utilizing Student Administrators in Higher Education

In this session you will learn how the Computer Action Team teaches the next generation of system administrators.
Culture 2013-02-12 22:50:14 +0000
William Van Hevelingen, Spencer Krum

Open Source Bridge 2012

Favorite sessions for this user

* Accessibility in Mobile Platforms: Bridging Divides

Mobile devices are changing the way we interact with the web, both as media consumers and social beings. We will explore the opportunities and challenges this change brings to users with disabilities.
Chemistry
Eitan Isaacson

* Building Developer Platforms

How do you transform your site or service into a platform others build on top of? How do you clear the path, lower the barriers, and make it easy for new developers to get started?
Chemistry
Scott Becker

* Building the Open Source Battle Rifle

A look at the technical and legal issues surrounding home construction of firearms, focusing on semi-automatic AK-47 style rifles.
Hacks
Beth Flanagan

* Coordinating Usability Testing in Free Software

Freedom 4: The freedom to use the program effectively, efficiently and satisfactory. For a software to truly be free, people need to be able to easily use it without help. A primer to usability testing in a distributed and independent development environment.
Cooking
Jan-Christoph Borchardt

* Dark Arts of Data Storage: What's Your Filesystem up to?

Ever wonder what happens to your data between the write() call and the disk drive? Or feel the need to scrape your bits off the drive after an accident? If so, this talk is for you! Come learn the dark art of how filesystems work.
Chemistry
Darrick Wong

* Easy Beats Open: The Challenge of Growing Open Source

"Open Source, in its majestic equality, guarantees both programmers and non-programmers alike the right to alter and recompile their software." The battle for Open Source Legitimacy is largely over: in many sectors, it's actually the preferred alternative. In the task-focused world that most casual computer users inhabit, however, "open-ness" is a meaningless abstraction and the walled gardens of closed source competitors offer compelling advantages. In this session, I'll explore the reasons that people make their choices, point out why "moral arguments" about open source are unlikely to change those choices, and discuss ways that our communities can further the ideals of Open Source without demonizing Grandpa's iPad.
Culture
Jeff Eaton

* Forking and Refining Data on the Open Web

Github has revolutionized social coding but where does social data stand in relation?
Chemistry
Max Ogden

* Free for Open Source: Marketing to Developers

Developers, like hipsters are simultaneously dead simple and infuriatingly difficult as marketing targets. Learn how supporting open source can be used as a tool to entice developers into your product's world.
Business
Michael Bleigh

* Go Go Gallimaufry

At one point it was popular to refer to the eyes as windows to the soul, and common wisdom accepted that you could learn a great deal about a person's inner thoughts by looking at their eyes. Then that notion fell out of fashion, except perhaps in love songs. But once we learned how to track people's eye motions, record them, and analyse the data, we realized that there may have been something to it.
Chemistry
Markus Roberts

* How Not to Release Software

You've seen a million best practice talks. This is quite the opposite: I'll instruct you in the ways I've failed over twenty years of software development, and advise you how not to make the same mistakes.
Business
Laura Thomson

* Information Radiation and You

Building your company's status board is more than just putting charts on a screen - numbers are just data, whether you write out the digits or plot a squiggly line. Learn to transform your data into information, and let that information instruct you.
Cooking
Pieter van de Bruggen

* Open Education Tools for Mentoring and Learning

The internet is full of information. Some of this information was made to help people learn. A subset exists under open licenses. These open educational resources (OERs) are used all over the world for learning and teaching. This talk will cover what some of them are and explore ways they have been (and can be) used for mentors and self-learners--both as individuals and in peer-study groups.
Culture
Molly de Blanc

* Painting the Bikeshed: Lessons from A Drupal 8 Initiative Lead

In March of 2011 I was named by Drupal project lead Dries Buytaert as lead of an initiative to improve configuration management for the next release. This talk will discuss how I went from lone coder to community leader and some of the lessons I learned along the way.
Culture
Greg Dunlap

* Pro-Style Code Review

Code review is awesome. Do more of it.
Business
Lennon Day-Reynolds

* Sorry for Browser Hacking

The web was born of a series of deeply audacious hacks that created and transformed the browser into the most important, transparent, buggy and misunderstood software ever. A big part of the credit for this goes to the ability of any programmer to hack the browser itself using the technology of the web itself.
Cooking
Jeff Griffiths

* Toward an Open Source Process for Security Vulnerabilities

Security vulnerabilities can be a source of anxiety and lost sleep, or they can be a carefully managed opportunity to bring communities together, practice safe operational practices, and prevent problems. Join me to discuss how we can all manage our security issues sanely and cooperatively, and lose less sleep!
Business
Larissa Shapiro

* Web Actions: A New Building Block for the Web

A web action is the user experience, code, and service for taking a specific discrete action, across the web, from one site to another site or application. You've all seen the buttons: Share, Read later, Follow, Like, Favorite, etc. More than any one social site or service, web actions are the emergence of a whole new hypermedia building block. This talk will give an overview of the anatomy of a web action, discuss web action user flow, and highlight best practices for both publishers and service providers.
Chemistry
Tantek Çelik

Favorite proposals for this user

* API-driven Internal Dashboard -- The devops.json and Gutsy open source projects

Many large systems are composed of smaller, API-driven services. In these service oriented architectures (SOA), developers work in small subteams consuming and producing abstractions. While APIs enhance development efficiency in the normal work-flow, failure cases are often non-standardized, with little to no information provided for operational and development issues such as downtime or developer on-boarding. Implementing internal devops.json endpoints, combined with the Gutsy DevOps Dashboard, significantly improves the cost and quality of outcomes to operational and development problems by enabling information discovery of people and infrastructure.
Culture 2012-03-09 17:04:27 +0000
Lucy Mendel

* Better Support Living through Software aka Make your own support workflow

Just say no to aimless, time wasting support forum browsing; the 1990s are over! Make your own awesome customized support flow.
Culture 2012-03-16 20:37:18 +0000
Roland Tanglao

* Creative destruction vs. TDD: can't we all just get along?

A summary of when to use what style of testing, and the guidelines, tools and attitude(s) that make your tests more effective.
Chemistry 2012-03-30 20:08:43 +0000
Kurt Sussman

* Data and Computational Journalism for Developers

In this talk, I'll introduce the concepts of data and computational journalism, and I'll talk about the open source tools I've collected. For those wishing to go further, I'll provide tools and hands-on training in a BOF session or during the unconference.
Cooking 2012-03-16 19:06:23 +0000
M. Edward (Ed) Borasky

* Documentation: Quick and Easy

Whether you’re just rolling out a new project, or you’re maintaining ten years and three major versions of legacy code, good documentation is vital for your users. But writing good docs doesn't need to be a long, painful process. This talk will get you started - and finished! - in no time.
Cooking 2012-03-14 01:05:02 +0000
Noirin Plunkett

* Education and participation: students + open source projects = win-win!

In lots of lectures, students work on imaginary projects just for the sake of learning something. Or they can choose what they work on – mostly That Popular Proprietary Software™ which does not care about their contributions. We need to change that.
Culture 2012-03-31 06:48:56 +0000
Jan-Christoph Borchardt

* From Cooking in Co-Ops to Apache Commits: Insights from Growing Horizontal Communities

The collaborative learning and changemaking open source culture and tools has proven that the collective is now stronger than any of its parts. But what are the most effective strategies for growing an community in the Millions? In this talk I'll showcase insights we can garner from intentional communities such as community radio stations and the cooperatives and how you can use those techniques to grow, scale and manage open source communities.
Business 2012-03-16 16:09:42 +0000
Francesca Krihely

* Large project migration from Subversion to Git: how hard can it be?

The trials and tribulations of taking a large project (MediaWiki), and migrating it from Subversion to Git.
Cooking 2012-03-16 01:28:06 +0000
Rob Lanphier

* Opening Open Source: Making Your Project Friendly to Everyone

Many open source projects run into the question: how do we get more people involved? How do we grow our contributors? How do we make our community more diverse?
Culture 2012-02-28 19:38:27 +0000
Pam Selle

* Real-World CouchDB

Lessons learned from using CouchDB on real-world projects in a government setting.
Cooking 2012-03-14 13:13:35 +0000
Matthew Woodward

* Seven Essential Skills to Cultivate for Happiness Working in the Open Source World

In this talk, Leslie and Amye will explore 7 essential skills for getting things done in the open source world. Hint: it looks a lot like the skills you need for your day job.
Culture 2012-03-07 23:24:27 +0000
Leslie Hawthorn, Amye Scavarda

* Take a code break, and hack your brain with a foreign language!

How I used free, available and Open Source technology for 1 year and 3 months to teach myself a conversational level of German. It can be applied to learning any foreign language, and anyone can do it!
Hacks 2012-03-31 01:15:55 +0000
Adam Christian

* The Mathematics of Human-Computer Interaction

Why do most computer interfaces flop? Why do so few succeed? Is it magic, or is there a method to the madness? Learn about some of the mathematical underpinnings of human-computer interaction, starting with Fitts' law in one-dimension and ending with the Accot-Zhai steering law in two.
Chemistry 2012-03-14 22:30:54 +0000
Daniel Sauble

* Tools of the PHP Trade

Writing code is one thing; however this session covers everything BUT the code, opening a box full of tools to use with your LAMP (but with a definite PHP flavour) stack. Expect a showcase of which tools are currently around, and when you'll want to use them. We'll see what they can do and how we can apply them in a practical way.
Cooking 2012-03-16 18:42:07 +0000
Lorna Mitchell

* What Open Education Can Learn From Open Source

While FLOSS projects aim to acquire contributors, Open Education projects look to acquire users. This talk will look at the current state of Open Education, FLOSS projects are successful in both open and functional contexts, and what FLOSS can do for open education.
Culture 2012-03-30 16:39:40 +0000
Molly de Blanc

Open Source Bridge 2011 Birds of a Feather

Favorite sessions for this user

* Google Summer of Code BoF

Meetup for students, mentors, and those interested in learning about Google Summer of Code.
BOF
Carol Smith

* PDXPHP Monthly meeting

PDXPHP is Portland's PHP user group. We meet every third tuesday.
BOF
Sam Keen

Open Source Bridge 2011

Favorite sessions for this user

* "Don't Give that Book Away!": Why Every Project Needs an Open Source Book

So your project needs a book? Do you write it yourself, or do you approach a publisher? This talk walks you through everything that factors into this decision providing real world examples of projects and companies offering open source books.
Cooking
Tim O'Brien

* 5 Easy Pieces: "Rabid Prototyping" With "Physical Computing" and Other Dirty Tricks.

Magic Windows, Football Field Style Bicycle Race Clocks, Talking Coffee Cups, Space Invaders Style Video Games, and A War On Christmas Lights.
Hacks
Donald Davis

* A Dozen Databases in 45 Minutes

What OSS database to use is an important decision, but recently languishing in the shadow of the sexier "what framework should I use" talks - or underplayed as though the battle were only SQL v noSQL. If your understanding of data storage tops out at "Mongo is webscale" or "mysql + memcached = win" then this talk is for you.
Cooking
Eric Redmond

* A Tangled Tale

Forum-based interactive learning is an important open tech community activity. We will look at a storytelling-based example from the past.
Culture
Bart Massey

* Composing Software Systems

If you can't reproduce your work reliably then you can't maintain it. You may get by for a while with ad-hoc build/release/deployment processes, but sooner or later they'll bite you. We'll present a new practical approach to assembling both software products and installed systems, drawing inspiration from sources including the functional programming community, commercial software projects, large IT deployments, and Linux distributions like Debian. Slides available at http://apters.com/osbridge2011.pdf
Cooking
Jamey Sharp, Josh Triplett

* Cookies are Bad for You: Improving Security on the Web

Almost every web application relies on cookies to authenticate each request after the user logs in. Cookies are vulnerable to cross-site request forgery and session hijacking. It is time to explore better, more secure alternatives that are now possible thanks to practical in-browser cryptography.
Chemistry
Jesse Hallett

* Creating Your Specific Live GNU/Linux Distribution with Debian Live Build

How to use Debian live build to create a specific live GNU/Linux distribution. It will be illustrated by these 3 live distributions: Clonezilla live, DRBL live, and GParted live, special live GNU/Linux distributions for system imaging/cloning, diskless linux, and graphical partition editor, respectively.
Cooking
Steven Shiau, Chenkai Sun, Yao-Tsung Wang, Thomas Tsai

* DNSSEC @ Mozilla

As the Internet world moves slowly towards implementing DNSSEC, this session aims to start at the basics of DNSSEC and goes on to discuss implementation details as well as best practices, some of the most common mistakes that happen during and after deployments and finally what’s in store for the near future.
Cooking
Shyam Mani

* Gearman: From the Worker's Perspective

Many people view topics like Map/Reduce and queue systems as advanced concepts that require in-depth knowledge and time consuming software setup. Gearman is changing all that by making this barrier to entry as low as possible with an open source, distributed job queuing system.
Chemistry
Brian Aker

* Get 'Em While They're Young: Cultivating the Next Generation of Open Source Contributors

Many open source projects participate in college mentorship programs, but what about younger students? Should we be cultivating the next generation of contributors from an earlier age?
Culture
Jane Wells

* GraphViz: The Open-Source Body Scanner for Code, Systems, and Data

Do you generate, manage, or analyze a lot of data? Do you develop software? Do you like pretty pictures? If your answer was "yes" to zero or more of these questions, this talk is for you.
Chemistry
Matt Youell

* How Python Saved 263 Lives, and Our Sanity

Faced with bit rot, expired proprietary software, and imminent collapse, we spent 2 weeks re-inventing a tsunami casualty simulator using open-source technologies. Come hear about the pitfalls, the elation, and how switching to an open stack changes the economics of city planning.
Culture
Jonathan Karon

* How to Ask for Money

Have a project that just needs some cash to get off the ground? Need someone to fund beer and food for an event? Have a great idea and want to get paid for implementing it? Come find out how we did it.
Business
Selena Deckelmann, J Chris Anderson, Teyo Tyree

* Inclusive Design From The Start

More and more FOSS projects are benefiting from a formal design process. This is an opportunity to see accessibility as a design requirement and integrate into earlier stages of the project's cycle as opposed to the afterthought it often is. In this talk we will see what a design process that integrates universal design looks like, and open the floor to discussion about inclusivity in design.
Cooking
Eitan Isaacson

* Intro to CouchDB

Overview of Apache CouchDB, who is using it, and how you can too.
Cooking
J Chris Anderson

* Inviting Contributors to Open Source Webdev through Virtualization

The bar to contribution in Open Source web development projects can be lowered through the use of devops tools and virtual machine technologies.
Cooking
Les Orchard

* IRL: How Do Geeks Undermine Their Presentations and Conversations with Body Language

Many geeks are uncomfortable interacting IRL with clients or audiences but you don't have to be. There are some simple physical tricks to keeping an audience (of 1 or 1k) engaged and not undermining your skills and yourself.
Hacks
Sarah Novotny

* Keeping Agile at the Heart of the Internet

BIND is the nameserver which runs 80% of DNS world wide... It is maintained by a non profit managed open source company and driven by an international user and developer community. What does product management, using scrum, on an open source project, with developers on three continents, look like?
Business
Larissa Shapiro

* Kick Asana

"Yoga for Geeks", sometimes known as "Yoga for Long-Haul Travelers", returns to Open Source Bridge! Come with your stiff shoulders, sore wrists, tight hips and aching back. Leave with ideas on how to incorporate 5 minutes of practice into your busy day to care for your body and mind.
Culture
Sherri Montgomery

* King of the Data Jungle

In this puppet show, a wise lion coaches an eager but inexperienced mouse through the process of normalization and (equally important) denormalization.
Cooking
Melissa Hollingsworth

* Law is Code, and We're Here to Open Source It

Anyone can show how to save the world. We tell how to receive unsolicited love letters while doing it.
Culture
Robb Shecter, Lisa Hackenberger

* Learn Tech Management In 45 Minutes

It took me two years to get a master's in tech management. I save you $40K and give you the short version.
Business
Sumana Harihareswara

* Massively Scaling Django for a Global Audience with Playdoh

Django is a great web application framework that allows for rapid web app development out of the box. Since Mozilla picked up Django in 2009, they've started over a dozen Django-based projects. For these sites to scale to an international audience of millions of users, bells and whistles were needed that a stock Django instance does not offer. Playdoh combines the experience of these projects into a template that contains various fixes and add-ons to make professional Django apps fast, featuring aggressive caching, instant localization support, and bullet-proof security.
Cooking
Frederic Wenzel

* No More Joins

Everything you learned about database modeling is wrong. At least for document databases like CouchDB and MongoDB. Learn about these differences, the trade-offs, the use cases, and put it all in practice in a discussion about a real-life document database problem. Unlearn SQL habits and relax.
Cooking
Nuno Job, J Chris Anderson, Roger Bodamer

* Online Community Metrics: Tips and Techniques for Measuring Participation

Do you know what people are really doing in your open source project? Having good community data and metrics for your open source project is a great way to understand what works and what needs improvement over time, and metrics can also be a nice way to highlight contributions from key project members. This session will focus on tips and techniques for collecting and analyzing metrics from tools commonly used by open source projects. It's like people watching, but with data.
Culture
Dawn Foster

* Open Source: Open to whom?

What makes the culture of open source so hostile to women and how can we as individuals act to change it?
Culture
Valerie Aurora

* Pulling the Plug

In order to keep a tree healthy, you have to prune its branches. This too is the case with an organization’s websites and projects. Let’s look at how Mozilla handles the end-of-life portion of a website’s life-cycle.
Business
Ryan Snyder

* Put THAT in Your Pipe and Deploy It!

A deployment pipeline combines several development best practices, fully automated and taken to their logical extreme. The result is almost magical: changesets go in one end, and fully-tested software packages come out the other. We'll take a tour of the components of a deployment pipeline, with concrete examples showing how to use Hudson, Rake, and Puppet to deploy PHP projects.
Cooking
David Brewer

* Sales-fu

Tricky to master. Sometimes the last thing you care about. (Let me code already, dammit.) However, a small amount of work on your sales-fu will pay off. So let's do this thing.
Business
Amye Scavarda

* Seven Habits Of Highly Obnoxious Trolls

Developing more effective habits isn't just for the good guys. We'll discuss seven methodologies that make trolls more effective---and tell you what you can do about it.
Culture
Bart Massey, Selena Deckelmann, Duke Leto

* So, You Want to Make a Map?

Practical cartographic geekery for accidental and padawan mapmakers: a crash course in Mapping 101 where we'll talk about the anatomy of maps and what you need to know when creating them. Topics include cartographic standards, projections, visualization, and the fine art of finding, deciphering, and using geodata and metadata. Included will be examples of the good, the bad, and the ugly, as well as resources for further exploration.
Chemistry
Sarah Beecroft, Darrell Fuhriman

* Technical Debt

Technical debt is something that most project teams or independent developers have to deal with - we take shortcuts to push out releases, deadlines need to be met, quick fixes slowly become the standard. In this talk, we will discuss what technical debt is, when it is acceptable and when it isn't, and strategies for effectively managing it, both on an independent and team level.
Cooking
Elizabeth Naramore

* The Big Data Exploratorium: Data Mining, from Patents to Memes

Learn to use simple natural language processing and graph analysis tools in Python and R to explore the structure of the dataverse. From Reddit to the USPTO to Google Books, come try some data hacks!
Cooking
Noah Pepper, Devin Chalmers

Favorite proposals for this user

* "You want me to test this !?!?" - Lessons learned from testing legacy code

In this talk I'll explore stategies for getting testing going inside your project, drawing upon experiences of making legacy code more testable.
Cooking 2011-02-02 04:22:53 +0000
John Mertic

* An Exploration of Hardware and what it Portends for Open Source Software

From the early PC to today's laptop we have a million times the memory, a million times the disk storage, and similar increases in processing capabilities. What problems/opportunities does another million fold increase in raw computing bring?
Chemistry 2011-03-14 20:33:43 +0000
Robert Thilsted

* Baby Steps into Open Source

At the Apache Software Foundation, we believe in being open. But we also recognize that "open" isn't enough to draw people in and get them involved. This talk will draw on the lessons learned in the incubation and mentoring projects at Apache to help you understand what's needed to tap the huge pool of potential contributors who already care about your work!
Culture 2011-03-22 22:28:50 +0000
Noirin Plunkett

* Best Practices for Using Selenium to Speed Up Cross Browser Testing

When you're in production, with real users and revenue on the line, you can't let a regression bug slip in and ruin your and your users' day. So you have to test. Everything. When you combine dozens of tests in several browser configurations, it takes forever. This session will provide an overview of the open source Selenium project and best practices for keeping up with your tests.
Cooking 2011-03-17 00:12:32 +0000
Adam Christian

* Forge.mil: What the Department of Defense can teach us about Community Development

Since its launch in 2009, Forge.mil, the Department of Defense’s groundbreaking collaborative software development platform, has quickly garnered over 8000 members and over 400 projects. Its utilization of open-source principles has improved the ability of the military to rapidly deliver dependable software. Its efficient use of scarce resources provides a model of collaborative cooperation that can benefit all communities in and out of the government.
Culture 2011-03-09 18:26:23 +0000
Guy Martin

* From MongoDB to MySQL: the How and the Why

Diaspora started out on MongoDB, but after nine months of full-time development we switched to MySQL. Why? How? And what now?
Cooking 2011-04-01 05:56:56 +0000
Sarah Mei

* Get more contributors (and diversity) through outreach

Want to learn how to *successfully* reach out to new contributors? Learn from other projects' successes
Culture 2011-04-01 05:27:37 +0000
Asheesh Laroia

* GNOME 3 - A New Desktop Experience

GNOME 3 was released in April 2011. A presentation on the thought process in innovating a different user experience on the desktop.
Cooking 2011-02-16 06:20:07 +0000
Sriram Ramkrishna

* Google Summer of Code Problems and Solutions

You're one-third of the way through Google Summer of Code. What's working, what's not, and what to do?
Cooking 2011-04-01 04:28:07 +0000
Sumana Harihareswara

* GovHub - Sustainable open source projects through government bids

Much of the difficulty for open source developers who try to work on civic or government apps is getting past the RFP process and convincing analysts and procurement officers that their projects have long term value and support. We hope to supply details on how to find and respond to the RFP process as well hints on how to work outside the process.
Business 2011-03-08 10:02:14 +0000
Greg Lind

* How Mozilla Webdev Stewards Roll

Mozilla's Webdev team is small, but helps out with over 100+ web properties. We're experimenting organizationally to scale ourselves. Learn about the new Webdev Steward role.
Culture 2011-03-25 18:55:37 +0000
Austin King

* IndexedDb: Your Client-side NoSQL DB

Sqlite provided a very cool offline storage system for web applications, but there is a new standards-based DB in town, IndexedDb. See how web applications can keep their user's data 100% private. Gawk at how sophisticated web applications can use offline local storage. Recoil in horror at the boring name... IndexedDb
Chemistry 2011-03-02 21:41:05 +0000
Austin King

* Introduction to OpenStack

The OpenStack project was launched last summer during OSCON by Rackspace, NASA, and a number of other cloud technology leaders in an effort to build a fully-open cloud computing platform. It is a collection of scalable, secure, standards-based projects consisting of compute, storage, images, and more. This session will introduce the projects, the principles behind it, and how to get started.
Cooking 2011-03-30 22:04:42 +0000
Eric Day

* Investigating Open Source Software Adoption in Governmental Contexts

Many value-creating strategies, products, and processes rely on information systems. Yet enabling access to these vital information resources through the procurement, implementation, and use of proprietary software is often complicated and costly. Proponents of open source software (OSS) claim that robust and yet affordable solutions are available because software engineers and programs around the world are able to contribute to source code that is open for anyone to modify and maintain overtime. This production model has shifted the notion of software as the intellectual property of a vendor, to a resource for all. However, questions remain about the viability of OSS for businesses and non-profits. For example, organizations seeking software-based solutions require the security of knowing that the software will not compromise their larger information infrastructure and hurt their business. Some software vendors now provide stable versions of open source software, which they call “vendor driven open source” that combine the strengths of open source with the security of having a direct contract with a company to provide technical/user support and software documentation. Through an exploratory field study of OSS use within city and state government, the researcher seeks insight into its viability for work operations.
Culture 2011-03-16 18:07:06 +0000
Erica Wagner

* Managing Brownfield Environments with Puppet

How to go from unmanaged to managed with Puppet, with devops practices and existing tools where possible and with open source hackery and spackle everywhere else.
Cooking 2011-03-17 00:16:08 +0000
Luke Kanies

* Postgres! The Musical

An animated musical mini-movie in which our heroine uses open-source software to overthrow the stranglehold of the evil head of IT, and finds true love in the process.
Culture 2011-03-31 00:08:16 +0000
Melissa Hollingsworth

* Project Management for Communities

Project management for open source communities is often taxing and difficult. Many community initiatives struggle because of the difficult environment of volunteerism and a lack of dedicated PM resources. This session will be a set of two case studies from PMs within the Drupal community.
Culture 2011-03-31 22:35:55 +0000
Chris Strahl, Melissa Anderson

* Running an Open Source Project in a Closed Source Community

How do you go about building an open source project in a community known for waiting on the Mothership to bless them with new code?
Culture 2011-02-17 07:57:21 +0000
John Sheehan

* Scalling, and Deploying Memcached with Libmemcached

Ever wanted to get a bit more out of Memcached? Wondering how to set it up for redundancy or load check your server? This talk will go over all of the latest features to libmemcached including new SSL and configuration data.
Hacks 2011-04-01 05:50:44 +0000
Brian Aker

* Small business koans

Master Foss said: “A man who mistakes secrets for knowledge is like a man who, seeking light, hugs a candle so closely that he smothers it and burns his hand.” This talk will cover koans for small, open source business enlightenment.
Business 2011-03-16 05:43:23 +0000
Jacinta Richardson

* Tour de OpenStack

Last year the cloud computing industry was changed dramatically with the introduction of OpenStack. The project is two releases deep - with one on the way – and it is currently the fastest growing cloud project in terms of code contributions and participating developers.
Chemistry 2011-04-01 00:53:06 +0000
Stephen Spector

* What to Count On: Help your Projects with Simple Metrics

You're working on a great project, but how do you know if you're on track compared to your goals? Your bosses (your customers, your user community) are asking for status every day and you don't know what tell them - or nothing you tell them seems to satisfy. Knowing what to count and how to communicate it can help you and your team track progress, identify problems, and communicate to those around you.
Business 2011-03-16 18:31:34 +0000
Nadya Duke Boone

Open Source Bridge 2010

Favorite sessions for this user

* Being a Catalyst in Communities - The science behind the open source way

How does Red Hat have wild success with Fedora and other FLOSS projects? By following a method firmly rooted in humanism, practice, and science. Learn in this session how to be an effective catalyst in communities of users, contributors, and businesses.
Culture
Karsten Wade

* Building Interactive Displays with Touchscreen 2.0

Touchscreen is a platform for creating interactive kiosk and dashboard displays. It powers presentations for visitors to the Open Source Lab's data center and the network operations center. Come learn how touchscreen works and how to use it for your own display screens.
Cooking
Peter Krenesky, Rob McGuire-Dale

* Foundations, Non-profits, and Open Source

Should you start a foundation? Should you start a nonprofit? What's the role of non-profits in the Open Source community today? How can you be a good citizen in the Open Source arena with a foundation to support?
Business
Carol Smith

* Free Speech, Free Software Across the World

How does free software help defend free speech in repressive regimes? Danny O'Brien will draw from the records of the Committee to Protect Journalists to explore how open source can help those at the cutting edge of free expression.
Culture
Danny O'Brien

* Functional Requirements: Thinking Like A Pirate

Creating functional requirements as a part of the planning process is like creating a treasure map. You want to get compensated for the value your cool built-with-open-source-thing is providing to your clients. Your clients want it to work better than what they originally had in mind. If you do the work upfront, you'll know when you've hit the X marks the spot.
Business
Amye Scavarda, Bill Fitzgerald

* Moonlighting in Sunlight – How to work on independent projects and have a day job.

Best practices for employers, employees and open source projects to coexist without legal conflicts.
Business
Paula Holm Jensen, Marc Alifanz

* Move Your Asana

This yoga session is of benefit to anyone who sits and works on computers a lot. Breathing exercises and physical postures that can be done anytime to help maintain a healthy body and clear mind will be taught. Suggestions will be included for how to modify stretches to protect injuries and provide gentle opening.
Culture
Sherri Montgomery

* SuperSpeed me: USB 3.0 Open Source Support

USB 3.0 promises a 10x speedup and better power management than USB 2.0. But how do these devices actually work? Is there open source support for them? Come learn about these fast new devices that are finally hitting the market.
Chemistry
Sarah Sharp

* Teach your class to fish, and they'll have food for a lifetime.

You have so much you want to teach, how do you structure it so that your training course is both interesting and challenging? How much theory can you squeeze into an hour before your attendees have forgotten where you started? How do you structure your course to account for classes which move slower or faster than average? This talk will cover all of these answers and more.
Business
Jacinta Richardson

* The Naive Developer's Guide to Venture Capital

What you need to know before you even think about raising venture or angel capital, presented by a Silicon Valley founder who raised $9m from top tier firms.
Business
Joyce Park

* The Rise of Hacker Spaces

Leigh will be discussing hacker spaces, and the culture of DIY spaces for making things around the world.
Culture
Leigh Honeywell

* The Second Step: HOWTO encourage open source work at for-profits

Even at pro-FLOSS businesses, logistical obstacles and incentive problems get in the way of giving back. I'll show you how to fix that.
Business
Sumana Harihareswara

* Why the Sysadmin Hates Your Software

You've worked really hard on your software. It's stable and has lots of nice features and users love it. But your sysadmin hates it and complains about how hard it is to install, configure, and manage. What's up with that?
Chemistry
Steve VanDevender

* X Marks the Spot: Applying OpenStreetMap to the High Seas

The United States has a treasure trove of nautical charts in digital form, including plots of shipwrecks, navigation buoys, coastal and river depths, and other fine booty. OpenStreetMap is an open source, open format collaborative project for building a free map of the world. Join this session to find out more of the marine secrets of the National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), OpenSeaMap's plans to extend OSM to the high seas, and splicing the two (and your mainbrace) together. We'll use the Geospatial Data Abstraction Library (GDAL), OGR, Python, and the OSM API.
Hacks
Liz Henry, Danny O'Brien

* You Shall Not Pass: Managing Expectations and Boundaries with Clients

Open Source is great fun, even in the area of professional services. But sometimes, you want to be able to pay the bills with your awesomeness too. One of the areas of difficulty is setting boundaries with clients, even though you really just want to write amazing stuff.
Business
Amye Scavarda, Chris Strahl

Favorite proposals for this user

* Building a platform from open source at Yahoo!

Join us for a case study on using open source tools to build a platform for enterprise web applications with symfony. The focus of this session will be on how Yahoo! has built web applications that scale with open source tools.
Chemistry 2010-02-24 22:12:54 +0000
Dustin Whittle

* Debt-Free: Technical Debt In Open Source Projects

Ship or fix? This choice presents itself to open source projects every day, and the consequences can be considerable. Learn how to control this "technical debt" in open source projects.
Cooking 2010-03-15 14:30:18 +0000
Brandon Savage

* Dynamic Sublists in GNU Mailman

Have you ever just wanted to unsubscribe from one of those tedious threads on your favorite mailing-list? List administrators wouldn't it be nice to allow end-users to unsubscribe from conversations rather then just silently leaving the list? Now you can using Dyanmic Sublists for GNU Mailman.
Hacks 2010-03-30 05:44:22 +0000
Jennifer Redman

* On predicting predictors: hacking archive formats for fun and prophecy

We aim to inform you about the archive formats you use every day. We will include an in-depth look at the tar, ar, cpio, gzip, bzip2, and deb formats, as well as the internals of the Git object store. Armed with this information, we will show you a practical application: removing the redundancy between files in version control and distributions of source and binaries.
Chemistry 2010-02-20 09:54:33 +0000
Jamey Sharp, Josh Triplett

* Should there be a free software app store?

Since free software "is a matter of liberty, not price", developers and distributions are allowed to ask users to pay for free software (though most users can easily choose not to). Musicians like Radiohead have experimented with asking, but not requiring, users to pay for music (by choosing their own price, which could be $0). What would happen if we did this for free software?
Business 2010-03-26 00:53:46 +0000
Seth Schoen

* The new schism: SQL vs. NoSQL

RDMS showed us the one true way to organize data, yet the NoSQL movement shows us how it fails. The faithful are confused and concerned. The heretics rally boldly in the streets with torches and pitchforks, yelling something about "doesn't scale," while the defenders of orthodoxy scream about the features and safeties these strange new gods lack, and do the apostates even realize it? As the philosophical storm brews, DB admins and developers must make fateful decisions that will affect the rest of the code's life. Here they will glean the first glimpses of the knowledge they will need to make informed choices and be spared the wrath of the database gods.
Chemistry 2010-03-29 23:17:58 +0000
Melissa Hollingsworth

* Thinking Like a Programmer: Building a Programming Curriculum

Let's discuss the development of a beginning Ruby programming curriculum for the general public.
Culture 2010-02-24 05:03:04 +0000
John Metta

* Usability testing on a shoestring

Usability testing can be fast, cheap and effective. Learn simple, unintimidating ways to do usability testing to identify things that are going horribly wrong.
Chemistry 2010-03-26 06:54:49 +0000
VJ Beauchamp