Jason LaPier's favorites

Open Source Bridge 2013

Favorite sessions for this user

* Intel Atom for Makers and the DIY Community

Learn about the MinnowBoard, a new open source embedded hardware platform for hackers and makers.
Cooking
Scott Garman

Open Source Bridge 2011

Favorite sessions for this user

* "Don't Give that Book Away!": Why Every Project Needs an Open Source Book

So your project needs a book? Do you write it yourself, or do you approach a publisher? This talk walks you through everything that factors into this decision providing real world examples of projects and companies offering open source books.
Cooking
Tim O'Brien

* "Why did you do that?" You're more automated than you think.

Your brain is really good at surviving in neolithic Africa, but not because of our powers of higher levels of thought; they're much too slow. Humans are so successful as a species because we're champions at automating things, including our own thoughts and behaviours. What's fascinating is that we're profoundly unaware of just how much our own lives run on automatic, and just how much our own behaviour is influenced by external factors. Join internationally acclaimed speaker Paul Fenwick as we examine the fascinating world of the human mind.
Culture
Paul Fenwick

* A Tangled Tale

Forum-based interactive learning is an important open tech community activity. We will look at a storytelling-based example from the past.
Culture
Bart Massey

* Bitcoin 101

An introduction to the cryptocurrency system called Bitcoin. The cryptography, the economics of currency bootstrapping, and the traction its getting today.
Culture
Don Park

* Drizzle, Virtualizing and Scaling MySQL for the Future

Ever wondered what would happen if you could rethink a decade worth of design changes? Drizzle is a redesign of the MySQL server targeted at web development and optimized for Cloud applications.
Hacks
Brian Aker

* ePUB - What, Why, and How

ePUB is the open e-book standard. Building on previous open standards, the ePUB format allows for flexible and flowing documentation, perfect for viewing on a variety of devices where the forced page sizing of other formats fails. We'll crack open some ePUB files and take a look at the innards and then we'll check out some tools to make ePUB generation less painful.
Cooking
Jason LaPier

* Getting Started with Semantic Web Applications

Leave rigid tables behind, and work with your data as a graph, using standard web data schemas.
Cooking
Leif Warner, Brian Panulla

* Growing Food with Open Source

Open source folks are naturally lazy. Anything mundane task they can automate, they will. So what does an open source developer do when faced with planning, planting, and tediously watering a garden? Automate!
Hacks
Sarah Sharp

* How 5 People with 4 Day Jobs in 3 Time Zones Enjoyed 2 Years Writing 1 Book

Hear how a distributed team tackled a big project (a book about a large open source project) in our spare time. Along the way, we encountered tools, techniques, and working styles that may be useful to you in your own career—or at least serve as a humorous warning.
Business
Ian Dees

* How Governments are Building Communities with Open Source

This session will provide examples of major government uses of open source technology, and provide some examples and case-studies of how government is contributing to open source and the web.
Business
Chris Strahl

* Improving Estimates for Web Projects

How many times have you received an email or phone call from a potential client who describes their project in a few sentences and expects a formal proposal the next day? This session will address this seemingly impossible task by going over the method we have created at OpenSourcery to estimate web projects. This method has helped us work with clients to prioritize functionality, set realistic schedules, and has improved our ability to close sales.
Business
Alex Kroman

* Inclusive Design From The Start

More and more FOSS projects are benefiting from a formal design process. This is an opportunity to see accessibility as a design requirement and integrate into earlier stages of the project's cycle as opposed to the afterthought it often is. In this talk we will see what a design process that integrates universal design looks like, and open the floor to discussion about inclusivity in design.
Cooking
Eitan Isaacson

* IRL: How Do Geeks Undermine Their Presentations and Conversations with Body Language

Many geeks are uncomfortable interacting IRL with clients or audiences but you don't have to be. There are some simple physical tricks to keeping an audience (of 1 or 1k) engaged and not undermining your skills and yourself.
Hacks
Sarah Novotny

* Learn Tech Management In 45 Minutes

It took me two years to get a master's in tech management. I save you $40K and give you the short version.
Business
Sumana Harihareswara

* No More Joins

Everything you learned about database modeling is wrong. At least for document databases like CouchDB and MongoDB. Learn about these differences, the trade-offs, the use cases, and put it all in practice in a discussion about a real-life document database problem. Unlearn SQL habits and relax.
Cooking
Nuno Job, J Chris Anderson, Roger Bodamer

* Sales-fu

Tricky to master. Sometimes the last thing you care about. (Let me code already, dammit.) However, a small amount of work on your sales-fu will pay off. So let's do this thing.
Business
Amye Scavarda

* Seven Habits Of Highly Obnoxious Trolls

Developing more effective habits isn't just for the good guys. We'll discuss seven methodologies that make trolls more effective---and tell you what you can do about it.
Culture
Bart Massey, Selena Deckelmann, Duke Leto

* Snooze, the Totally RESTful Language

As you can see we get a "403 Forbidden" in response to our "POST /integer/5/increment"...can anyone tell me why? It worked when we did "PUT /variable/x/let/integer/5" followed by "POST /variable/x/increment", so why can't we do it directly?
Hacks
Markus Roberts

* So, You Want to Make a Map?

Practical cartographic geekery for accidental and padawan mapmakers: a crash course in Mapping 101 where we'll talk about the anatomy of maps and what you need to know when creating them. Topics include cartographic standards, projections, visualization, and the fine art of finding, deciphering, and using geodata and metadata. Included will be examples of the good, the bad, and the ugly, as well as resources for further exploration.
Chemistry
Sarah Beecroft, Darrell Fuhriman

* The Independent Software Developer

So you love open source? Spend more time doing what you love: go into business for yourself.
Business
Peat Bakke

Open Source Bridge 2010

Favorite sessions for this user

* Activity Streams, Socialism, and the Future of Open Source

It may seem obvious to some, but the socialist imagery that Mozilla uses isn't accidental. Nor is the grounding of Activity Streams in socialist theory. What do these things have to do with open source an its future? A lot, and I'll paint a picture to tell you how it should play out.
Chemistry
Chris Messina

* Being a Catalyst in Communities - The science behind the open source way

How does Red Hat have wild success with Fedora and other FLOSS projects? By following a method firmly rooted in humanism, practice, and science. Learn in this session how to be an effective catalyst in communities of users, contributors, and businesses.
Culture
Karsten Wade

* Best Practices for Wiki Adoption

Wikis are easy as pie to install, edit, and even to develop. The real challenge they present is in bringing together the right people in the right way to make things happen. There are ways to tackle that challenge that can give your open source community a fighting chance.
Cooking
Steven Walling, Ted Ernst

* Creating a low-cost clustered virtualization environment using Ganeti

Creating a redundant yet scalable virtualization environment is often difficult and expensive. Ganeti is an open source project which offers many solutions to simplify a clustered virtual machine environment while enabling you to use low cost hardware. This session will walk through Ganeti covering its basic design goals/features, installation architecture, and production implementation.
Chemistry
Lance Albertson

* Creating Embedded Linux Products with OpenEmbedded

Learn about the current state of embedded Linux distributions and advantages of the OpenEmbedded framework for developing Linux-based products.
Cooking
Scott Garman

* eBooks, ePub, iPad, Kindle, o-my

Print is dead. Well, not dead yet. But it'll be stone dead in a moment.
Chemistry
Lennon Day-Reynolds

* Foundations, Non-profits, and Open Source

Should you start a foundation? Should you start a nonprofit? What's the role of non-profits in the Open Source community today? How can you be a good citizen in the Open Source arena with a foundation to support?
Business
Carol Smith

* Give a Great Tech Talk

Why do so many technical presentations suck? Make sure that yours doesn't. Josh Berkus and Ian Dees will show you how to share your ideas with your audience by speaking effectively and (when the situation warrants it) showing your code.
Culture
Josh Berkus, Ian Dees

* Hair and Yak Again -- A Hacker's Tale

API design, parallelism, automated testing, parallel automated testing, deployment, build tools, meta programming, GUI design and construction, hardware interfaces, network protocols, databases, change tracking, file formats, and why simple software becomes an epic journey.
Chemistry
Eric Wilhelm

* Housetruck: Building a Victorian RV

As a "software person," I found the hard technologies of building with steel and wood made for a very different creative and hacking process. At the same time, I discovered many parallels to software development, embedded hardware, and even open-source philosophies.
Hacks
John Labovitz

* How To Report A Bug

Bug reports drive Open Source, but too often it's a hostile experience. As a user, how do you report a bug without being treated like you're dumping a sack of crap on the developer's doorstep? As a developer, how do you encourage users to report bugs? This is not a tutorial, but an examination of the social aspects of bug reporting.
Cooking
Michael Schwern

* How to write quality software using the magic of tests

Writing quality software is a worthwhile challenge. Learn how to harness the magic of testing to create better software. This presentation will provide you with an overview of the different kinds of tests, show code using different testing tools, and help you decide when and how to apply these to your projects
Cooking
Igal Koshevoy

* iizip: Hacking together your own Dropbox

Dropbox, the leader in online storage and synchronization, is good, but not good enough. Find out how you can hack together your own equivalent that's more flexible, secure and convenient.
Hacks
Ben Dechrau

* Lightning Talks

LIGHTNING TALKS!
Hacks
Peter Fein

* Living Together In An Open Cloud World

With millions of users signing on daily to access their favorite social media services – be it Twitter, Facebook or Digg – a developer’s worst fear is not having the backend support to house and provide access to such huge amounts of related data. Industry efforts to architect next generation databases that can scale massively by pairing open source databases and content management technologies with cloud-computing are underway. The door is also “opening” to a whole new world of user benefits which will be made possible by access to data -- cross-cloud -- in non-proprietary databases and content management systems.
Chemistry
Jonathan Bryce

* Moonlighting in Sunlight – How to work on independent projects and have a day job.

Best practices for employers, employees and open source projects to coexist without legal conflicts.
Business
Paula Holm Jensen, Marc Alifanz

* Node.js and you

Node.js is one of the most exciting things to happen to server-side development in the last few years. Here you'll find out why Node.js is a perfect fit for your next project and a better fit than existing languages for modern web development.
Cooking
Mikeal Rogers

* Open Source and the Open Social Web

Open Source software has been instrumental in the development of every revolutionary communications technology on the Internet. The Open social Web is no different.
Chemistry
Evan Prodromou

* Open Source Storage Solutions and Next Generation Linux File Systems

Unlike most areas of enterprise IT, open source solutions in the storage industry have remained in the background. In 2010 this situation is going to change dramatically with new open source storage solutions, next-generation Linux file systems, and emerging cloud offerings making significant inroads.
Cooking
Anand Babu (AB) Periasamy

* Professional JavaScript

JavaScript is a unique and powerful language. Its ubiquity in the browser and its elegant concurrency model make JavaScript an ideal tool in a number of situations. Learn about the best ways to use and to understand this language from a full-time JavaScript professional.
Chemistry
Jesse Hallett

* Relational vs. Non-Relational

What kind of database do you need? Thanks to new database projects like CouchDB, TokyoCabinet, Solr and others, there are more non-relational database options available than ever for developers. Yet good information on how to choose what kind of database you need is still scarce. We'll cure that in this talk.
Cooking
Josh Berkus

* State of MariaDB

MariaDB 5.1 is branch of MySQL 5.1 and is drop in replacement for MySQL 5.1 with additional features, speed enhancements and bug fixes.
Cooking
Michael Widenius

* The Fine Line Between Creepy and Fun

Social software is kind of a big deal right now. In the open-source spirit of transparency and dissection, let's talk about what makes social technology creepy, what makes it fun, and how to hack things to maximize your desired outcome.
Hacks
Audrey Eschright

* The Story of Spaz: How to Give Away Everything, Make No Money, and Still Win

What motivates us as developers? How do we define success? Throughout the development of Spaz, we've learned a lot about what works, what doesn't, and what really matters. Come to hear the story, and participate in the discussion of how we define success in open source.
Business
Edward Finkler

* Unlikely tools for pair programming

Co-conspirators Jamey Sharp and Josh Triplett get up to a lot of miscellaneous hacking mischief together. Much of this hacking occurs while staring at the same screen, and tag-teaming the keyboard. Sometimes this happens with the two of them in different places. We'll demo our favorite tools and invite audience contributions to the discussion.
Cooking
Jamey Sharp, Josh Triplett

Favorite proposals for this user

* 'Open Source Business Models' and other mythical creatures

A humorous look at the taxonomy of Open Source ecosystems and the businesses that support/are supported by them based on one person's reflections and observations on a two years spent building an open source business and selling 'free'.
Business 2010-03-26 03:25:34 +0000
Andrew Clay Shafer