Jamey Sharp's favorites

Open Source Bridge 2015

Favorite sessions for this user

* Bringing Security to Your Open Source Project

With high profile breaches in open source projects, the issue of security has become one of great import to many people. But many projects, especially smaller ones, are intimidated by the idea of a security audit. This talk will discuss ways for smaller projects to experiment, learn, and even have fun improving their security. No PhDs in security required!
Culture
Terri Oda

* Building Diverse Social Networks

While only a handful of social networks like Dreamwidth and Quirell explicitly prioritize diversity, there are plenty of lessons to learn about what to do — and what not to do — from Facebook, Twitter, and others. Best practices include counter-oppressive politics, embedded in the community guidelines and norms; and the right tools, technologies, and policies. This session will look at what does and doesn't work in a variety of online environments.
Culture
Jon Pincus, Lynn Cyrin

* Care and Feeding of a Healthy Job Hunt

A job hunt can be a demoralizing and dehumanizing process, but there are a lot of things which you can do to make it more productive and less stressful.
Business
VM Brasseur

* Dog Food is for Dogs: Escape the Crate of Your Perspective with User Research

Dogfooding—using your own products—is nice, but is it sufficient to produce good design for people who aren’t you? Our familiarity with our projects and their quirks makes us poor substitutes for users in the wild. So just who are these users, and how do you incorporate them into design and development? In this workshop, we'll explore user experience design and research strategies that will help you design for people who aren’t you.
Cooking
Rachel Shadoan, amelia abreu

* Economics of Volunteer Labor: Three stories from Debian

What circumstances allow volunteer projects to flourish? This talk covers three examples in Debian, diving deep into the questions like whose permission is required, what technical background is needed, and more, to highlight lessons of that can help any open source community organize its activities to empower volunteers.
Culture
Asheesh Laroia

* Failing With Grace

One of the biggest challenges of building distributed systems is dealing with failure. In this talk we'll explore how distributed systems fail and then once we're good and scared, we'll cover a number of approaches and tools to help you deal with failure.
Cooking
Sean O'Connor

* Free Your Money: Open Source Crowdfunding Tips & Tools

Crowdfunding has become big business for companies like Kickstarter and Patreon. This 'corporate crowdfunding tax' can sometimes burden small projects. Is it time to kick commercial crowdfunding to the curb? Let's share new strategies for DIY marketing and funding project online with Open Source tools
Business
Skyler Corbett

* From the Inside Out: How Self-Talk Affects Your Community

Identifying and discouraging negative self-talk is a simple thing, but it can have a huge impact on your community in a positive way. It increases self-confidence, improves morale, and generally results in happier, more productive community participants. This, in turn, will make you happy.
Culture
Kat Toomajian

* Hosting Events that the Whole Community Loves

So, you're responsible for a growing an open source community and you want to ensure it's a friendly place for newcomers and old-timers alike. You want to make sure everyone feels welcome and has access to a variety of events (both on and offline) with content that meets the needs of all of your user base from beginner to advanced. This talk will...
Culture
Meg Hartley

* How Do Python Coroutines Work?

Asynchronous I/O frameworks like Node, Twisted, Tornado, and Python 3.4’s new “asyncio” can efficiently scale past tens of thousands of concurrent connections. But async coding with callbacks is painful and error-prone. Programmers increasingly use coroutines in place of callbacks to get the best of both worlds: efficiency plus a natural and robust coding style. I’ll explain how asyncio’s coroutines work. They are built using Python generators, the “yield from” statement, and the Future and Task classes. You will gain a deep understanding of this miraculous new programming idiom in the Python standard library.
Chemistry
A. Jesse Jiryu Davis

* How you tell the story matters: telling better stories and making better technologies

What happens when we tell stories? How do we tell stories about the technology we build, why do some stories get told over others? How do we talk about our successes, and how do we not talk about our failures? Whose stories get heard: how do women, people of color, disabled people, and “non-technical” workers get left out of the stories we hear? In this talk, I'll explore the role of storytelling in technology, and share what I've found about telling better stories.
Business
amelia abreu

* HTTP Can Do That?!

I have explored weird corners of HTTP -- malformed requests that try to trick a site admin into clicking spam links in 404 logs, an API that responds to POST but not GET, and more. In this talk I'll walk you through those (using Python, netcat, and other tools you might have lying around the house).
Hacks
Sumana Harihareswara

* Internet of Things Militia: Paramilitary Training for your IoT devices

Security folk generally talk about how the Internet of Things is bad for security, but it also brings new sensors and connected devices that could co-operate in new and interesting ways. Could we use internet things to enhance security?
Hacks
Terri Oda

* Leveraging Docker to Enable Learning

When giving workshops or presenting online tutorials, it's frequently the case that the system setup can take longer than the actual learning exercises. Using Docker to provide a learning sandbox solves this problem while avoiding changing the learner's system in potentially destructive ways.
Cooking
Kirsten Hunter

* Monads Made Semi-Understandable

The word monad is all around us. I've heard long explanations of it that seem to over complicate it or make it intimidating. At Hacker School one of my goals was to learn some category theory, and understand the beast. I finally got it, and it wasn't so bad. I wanted to explain monads in a way that would not intimidate people and that would so some solid examples so if they felt like i had before, I might be able to help.
Hacks
libby kent

* Open Source Tools of the Hardware Hacking Trade

Many embedded systems contain design flaws that could lead to exploitable vulnerabilities. In order to discover such flaws, hackers and engineers use a specific set of tools. In this session, Joe will discuss his favorite open source hardware hacking and reverse engineering tools, including those that monitor/decode digital communications, extract firmware, inject/spoof data, and identify/connect to debug interfaces.
Cooking
Joe Grand

* Probably

If you want to understand probability better (and you should), this is the talk for you.
Chemistry
Bart Massey

* Trustworthy software in the real world

Software is made of bugs, yet software is controlling a growing part of our physical world. As bugs and security holes become potentially life-threatening, what can we do to make our software worthy of the trust we're placing in it? Take quadcopters, for example. Toy vehicles are not just in specialty hobby shops but even in supermarkets; sports stadiums and the White House are trying to find ways to keep them out; and everyone from agriculture startups to Amazon wants to use them commercially. Quadcopters are becoming safety and security critical systems, but how are we going to make them truly safe and secure? I'll present SMACCMPilot, a BSD-licensed high-assurance quadcopter autopilot, and the new tools and technologies that make it feasible to trust a large piece of software.
Hacks
Jamey Sharp

* What Are Computers, Really?

We'll take a whirlwind tour of the theory behind what computers do. We'll start with counting on our fingers and end with an explanation of why there are some problems where the laws of physics say "no, a computer can never do this". No mathematical background necessary.
Chemistry
Clarissa Littler

* When Your Codebase Is Nearly Old Enough To Vote

What do you do when your project is so old that technology has changed around you? (Or, how do you future-proof a project that you've just started so that when it gets that old, you'll be ready?) Come hear a case study of Dreamwidth Studios, a fifteen-year-old web app with a codebase consisting of a quarter million lines of legacy Perl and a mission to modernize ... if it doesn't break everything.
Chemistry
Denise Paolucci

* You Got Your Idris in My C++! A First Look at Denotational Design

Programmers gripe that we have two kinds of programming languages: the ones we write in for fun, and the ones we write in because we have to. We may enjoy coding that weekend project in Agda, but we have to leave that smile behind on Monday morning when we go back to Java or C++. But is that really the case? Or can we find a way of bringing the expressiveness, the rigor, or the fun of our favorite languages into our day jobs?
Chemistry
Ian Dees

Favorite proposals for this user

* Three Bug Stories

Learn to write better code by hearing interesting ways that code has gone wrong!
Cooking 2015-03-08 03:29:05 +0000
Moss Collum

Open Source Bridge 2014

Favorite sessions for this user

* "Why are these people following me?": Leadership for the introverted, uncertain, and astonished

So you've had an idea, or noticed a gap that needs filling, or wondered why no one's talking about an issue you care about. Like the motivated and competent person you are, you start working, or writing, or talking. People start noticing you, listening to you, even asking for your opinion about their own projects--and one day, you realize they're treating you just like you treat your own role models. You find this unsettling. Surely motivation and competence aren't that special, you think. You, a leader? Can't be. And if you actually are a leader, what do you do now?
Culture
Frances Hocutt

* Beyond Leaning In: How to Negotiate to Get What You Want

Now that you know how important it is to ask for want you want, come learn how to negotiate in a way that will get you what you need. For everyone of any gender identity who works at a company or freelances, who feels like a newb or an expert, this presentation will teach you effective, practical skills to improve your negotiations and deal confidently with conflicts.
Business
Katie Lane

* Code review for Open Source

Everyone knows that code quality is important, but what can we do to actually ensure that our codebases meet the standards we'd like? This talk dives into how to implement code review in your project. What do patch authors need to do, what do patch reviewers need to do, what strategies can you implement to get the best results, and how can you leverage code review to grow your community?
Culture
Alex Gaynor

* Crash Course in Tech Management

Managing is a skill which you can master just as you did programming. This session will introduce you to many of the skills and resources you’ll need to become a successful tech manager (and keep your team from wanting to string you up).
Business
VM Brasseur

* Data Wrangling: Getting Started Working with Data for Visualizations

Good data visualization allows us to leverage the incredible pattern-recognition abilities of the human brain to answer questions we care about. But how do you make a good visualization? Here's a crash course.
Cooking
Rachel Shadoan

* Freedom, security and the cloud

Cloud hosting is cheap. Cloud hosting is easy. What compromises are you making when you deploy to the cloud, both in terms of your security and in terms of your dependency on proprietary software?
Chemistry
Matthew Garrett

* From the Bottom Up: Building Community-Owned and -Operated Mesh Networks

This panel highlights the work of a few folks representing part of a broad, international movement consisting of network engineers, community change makers, researchers, architects, and thinkers who are building decentralized and autonomous communications infrastructure. We know that the Internet is deeply broken, and we are rebuilding, from the inside out. We mitigate the ills of interception and interference on the net by facilitating networks that are owned, operated, and governed by the people that use them.
Culture
Jenny Ryan, Mitar Milutinovic, Marc Juul, Russell Senior

* Futel: the future of the past of telephony

Futel is more than a collection of payphones installed in publicly accessible locations. Find out what we hope to achieve by starting a free telephone network.
Hacks
Karl Anderson

* Hacking In-Group Bias for Fun and Profit

Our lives and social interactions are governed by sociology and psychology. As geeks, we strive to understand how the technology around us works, and we strive to find ways to make it better. Society is basically one big, complex piece of technology, and, like all technology, it is hackable. This talk will explain how you can do that.
Culture
Kat Toomajian

* History of Concurrency

With new languages like Dart, Go, and Rust coming with powerful concurrency primitives (and languages like C# & Java adding more concurrency features), it's important to know where these ideas come from and where concurrency handling is headed.
Chemistry
Michael Schurter

* How I Learned Haskell by Writing Tiny Games

Earlier this year, I started teaching myself Haskell by using it to write short, text-based games. In this session I'll share what I learned, both about Haskell and about learning new things.
Hacks
Moss Collum

* How to make generics in C: an adventure in sorting

This will be a talk on how to hack C to get generics-like support, which we used to make a super-fast C sorting library, all in headers. We'll also talk about sorting in general, and the various kinds of sorting algorithms, and why this hack helps so much.
Hacks
Christopher Swenson

* Internet Archive: More than the Wayback Machine

In this session we will: * Give you a tour of Internet Archive and its collections * Introduce you to the APIs and tools you can use to access and contribute to the Archive * Show examples of how other people and institutions are using the Archive
Chemistry
VM Brasseur, Alexis Rossi

* Know Thy Neighbor: Scikit and the K-Nearest Neighbor Algorithm

This presentation will give a brief overview of machine learning, the k-nearest neighbor algorithm and Scikit-learn. Sometimes developers need to make decisions, even when they don't have all of the required information. Machine learning attempts to solve this problem by using known data (a training data sample) to make predictions about the unknown. For example, usually a user doesn't tell Amazon explicitly what type of book they want to read, but based on the user's purchasing history, and the user's demographic, Amazon is able to induce what the user might like to read.
Cooking
Portia Burton

* Lightning Talk Workshop

Heard of lightning talks but never considered giving one? Never fear, lightning talks are easy! During this session, you'll write and practice your first lightning talk.
Cooking
Michelle Rowley

* Lights, Art, Action! An exploration in technology, art, and making mistakes

Curious about integrating open source and art? We’ll explore a particular project in detail while providing both functionality and process recommendations. Both the art and the hardware will come to visit, along with the creators.
Cooking
Catriona Buhayar, Bill Madill

* Make your wireless router route (or anything else) the way you want it to, with OpenWrt.

How to build an OpenWrt image from source to do just what you want it to on your suitably chosen hardware.
Cooking
Russell Senior

* Math vs. Mathematics

Most people got through their high school math classes by memorizing nonsensical statements and regurgitating them on command. If you came out of that class hating math, no one would blame you, especially not a mathematician. However, that class didn't teach Intro to Algebra, it taught Intermediate Following Instructions.
Chemistry
Georgia Reh, Jenner Hanni

* Network Science for Fun and Profit

Understanding the relationships between data elements has become increasingly valuable, as LinkedIn, Facebook and Google illustrate. Network science provides a means to understand, explain, predict and otherwise utilize these relationships. I will provide a brief overview of network science, with examples and illustrations using R, focused on providing an entry point to their use for fun and profit.
Cooking
John Taylor

* OAuth, IndieAuth, and the Future of Authorization APIs

You use OAuth every time you log in to Facebook or Twitter, but what if you could use it from your own website? What if your own domain became a source of data, and you had your own personal API? By decentralizing authorization to your own domain instead of a silo, you control when, how, and to whom your data is shared.
Chemistry
Aaron Parecki

* Open Hardware from Breadboard to PCB

So you've built a breadboard circuit with wires everywhere. What's next? A printed circuit board! I'll talk about your open hardware development options through the lens of my recent project turning a breadboard prototype into a finished Arduino shield for a curing oven at Portland State.
Cooking
Jenner Hanni

* Power Tuning Linux: A Case Study

In this talk we will do a reality-check in terms of the power consumption on off-the-shelve systems running “out of the box” Linux distributions.
Chemistry
Alexandra Yates

* Random

If you want to understand randomness better (and you should), this is the talk for you.
Chemistry
Bart Massey

* Rocket Science On Github

Git isn't just for code. What about CAD files? Experimental test data? How do you manage a multidisciplinary project with git? Last year Portland State Aerospace Society, a relatively large open source rocketry project, moved all their work onto github. I'll share my experience with the switch from a few self hosted git repos to a full fledged github presence. What worked, what hasn't, github's features for non coders, and a little on the future of open science.
Culture
Nathan Bergey

* Slytherin 101: How To Win Friends and Influence People

Do you wish that you were better at getting people to do what you need them to do? Do you keep getting put in charge of things and then get stuck wondering how the heck you're supposed to get things done? Do you keep getting into conflicts with other people because of stuff you've said, and you aren't entirely sure why? Fortunately, Slytherin House has you covered. Come to this talk and learn the basics of how to hack human relationships, using the tools of cunning and ambition to achieve inter-House harmony. As long as you promise not to use these techniques to support the next Dark Lord, of course.
Culture
Denise Paolucci

* Supporting communities with Gittip

There are lots of people doing good work in the world, and while there seems to be a myriad of ways to provide financial "donations", few of them provide a way to do so in a sustainable manner. We're going to look at Gittip, a freedom loving platform to provide a sustainable, predictable income to those making the world a better place.
Culture
Paul Fenwick

* Surviving Support: 10 Tips for Saving Your Users and Yourself

When I open sourced my plugin to the WordPress community, user support was one of the last things on my mind - I was more excited to have written awesome code and a helpful site extension. Shortly thereafter though, customer support was the only thing I had time for. When your user base ranges in skill level from experienced developer to your grandmother, well… you've gotta be prepared for just about anything. This session will highlight the challenges and benefits of stellar support and offer a few tricks to make the process as painless as possible for both your user and yourself.
Culture
Julie Cameron

* The 20,000km view: How GPS works

GPS is more than just letting your phone tell you where you are. I believe GPS is a contender for "most amazing piece of engineering in the history of humanity", and I'll show you why.
Chemistry
Jamey Sharp

* The Outreach Program for Women: what works & what's next

We've mentored and interned in the Outreach Program for Women, and we know it works -- it improves the gender balance inside open source communities. We'll discuss why it works, how it builds off of Google Summer of Code, and discuss replicating it, expanding it, and looking at the next step in the recruiting and inclusion pipeline.
Cooking
Sumana Harihareswara, Liz Henry

* When Many Eyes Fail You: Tales from Security Standards and Open Source

It's often said that "given many eyes, all bugs are shallow" and open source proponents love to list this as a reason that open source is more secure than its closed-source relatives. While that makes a nice sound bite, the reality of security with many eyeballs doesn't fit so nicely into a tweet. This talk will explore some of the things that surprised me in going from academic security research to industry security research in open source and open standards.
Culture
Terri Oda

* Who broke the code? Finding problems quickly in a quickly evolving opensource project

In this talk, we will overview the 0day kernel test infrastructure, an Intel project where the goal is to ensure the quality of Linux upstream and developmental kernels. The project runs 7x24 tests on bleeding edge code from 300+ kernel git trees.
Chemistry
Timothy Chen

* Working Effectively with People in Government on Open Source Projects

Ever thought about ways to use your open source skills to improve your city? In this session we'll talk about successful models for working with people in government, from pitching your project, communicating effectively, finding experts, tracking down data, to launching in the community.
Culture
Jason Denizac

Favorite proposals for this user

* An Introduction to Dependent Types and Proving Your Code Correct

This will be an introduction to dependently typed programming, the Curry-Howard correspondence, and using your type system as a proof system for showing that your code is correct all done in the programming language Agda.
Chemistry 2014-04-04 00:58:09 +0000
Clarissa Littler

* Developing open source projects and not being worried about making a living - an introduction to the idea of basic income

Contributing to open source projects and not worrying about making a living? What sounds like a dream could become true with an economic concept called basic income. The idea is currently debated in various countries. The talk will introduce the concept and outline the opportunities for the open source community.
Business 2014-04-04 02:08:29 +0000
Hannes Hapke

* Fix Code, Delete Docs

Educators, authors, and co-workers are constantly demanding more code comments and documentation, yet none of them ever update it. The comments lie, the documentation exists in three variants, and still nobody knows how to make the code do the right thing.
Chemistry 2014-04-04 08:03:19 +0000
Eric Wilhelm

* From the Inside Out: How Self-Talk Affects Your Community

Identifying and discouraging negative self-talk is a simple thing, but it can have a huge impact on your community in a positive way. It increases self-confidence, improves morale, and generally results in happier, more productive community participants. This, in turn, will make you happy.
Culture 2014-04-04 16:50:29 +0000
Kat Toomajian

* Having Pure Fun on the Web With Haskell

Practical programming in Haskell: is that an oxymoron? Not at all: in recent years, many programmers have joined together to create a vibrant library ecosystem for the Haskell programming language. In this interactive workshop, you will see the skeleton of a web service implemented in Haskell, then write your own code to implement the missing pieces. Whether you go on to learn more Haskell or just apply new ideas to your work in any language, you'll leave knowing the Haskell is pure fun.
Chemistry 2014-03-06 07:06:50 +0000
Tim Chevalier

* Systems programming as a swiss army knife

Why understanding some systems programming basics will make you a better developer.
Cooking 2014-03-28 03:12:24 +0000
Julia Evans

* What Are Computers, Really?

We'll take a whirlwind tour of the theory behind what computers do. We'll start with counting on our fingers and end with an explanation of why there are some problems where the laws of physics say "no, a computer can never do this". No mathematical background necessary.
Chemistry 2014-04-04 00:45:10 +0000
Clarissa Littler

* Working for a Free/Libre/Open World: Snowdrift.coop as a model of community patronage and participation in software and beyond

In designing Snowdrift.coop, we have done our due diligence. For example, we actually reviewed over 700 crowdfunding and related platforms. We've read dozens of Codes of Conduct. This is the Open Source ideal: making the most of past resources and ideas. I can tell you about such things as the struggles with the idea of bounty fundraising (where you offer to pay if someone makes a certain feature or fixes a certain bug in a program). It's been a popular idea but has some fatal flaws. There have been dozens of failed bounty-style funding systems, but a few have somewhat succeeded (and I can tell you which of those are the most ethical and Open Source). People who have not researched the history keep proposing this same flawed idea over and over. In this talk, I'll share with you the challenges and insights in building a new platform dedicated to Free/Libre/Open ideals and how we have made tough choices about when to avoid wheel-reinventing and when to break with the past and push for new ideals.
Culture 2014-04-01 19:58:09 +0000
Aaron Wolf

* You can be a kernel hacker

Writing operating systems sounds like it's only for wizards, but it turns out that operating systems are written by humans like you and me. I'm going to tell you what a kernel is and why you should care. Then we'll talk about a few concrete ways to get started with kernel hacking, ranging from the super-easy to the terrifyingly difficult.
Chemistry 2014-03-06 17:42:15 +0000
Julia Evans

Open Source Bridge 2011 Birds of a Feather

Favorite sessions for this user

* Developing an open source application to support a community mentor network in Portland

Since January of this year, a group of independent programmers, community-based organizations, public officials, and software executives and entrepreneurs have been working as part of the PDX11 initiative to identify solutions to make it easier for local software professionals to establish mentoring relationships. This presentation will outline a novel approach to developing a software application to support the local tech community and will invite feedback from attendees to help shape the process moving forward.
BOF
Skip Newberry

* DevOps, Cloud, Automation and more! (Part 1 of 2)

Lightning talks and discussions on devops best practices, cloud infrastructures, and automation tools.
BOF
Igal Koshevoy, James Turnbull, James Loope

* DevOps, Cloud, Automation and more! (Part 2 of 2)

Lightning talks and discussions on devops best practices, cloud infrastructures, and automation tools. [continuation of earlier BoF]
BOF
James Turnbull, Igal Koshevoy, James Loope

* Functional Languages BoF [pdxfunc]

Hang out and talk about functional languages.
BOF
Igal Koshevoy, Dan Colish, David Lazar

Open Source Bridge 2011

Favorite sessions for this user

* A Tangled Tale

Forum-based interactive learning is an important open tech community activity. We will look at a storytelling-based example from the past.
Culture
Bart Massey

* Bitcoin 101

An introduction to the cryptocurrency system called Bitcoin. The cryptography, the economics of currency bootstrapping, and the traction its getting today.
Culture
Don Park

* Composing Software Systems

If you can't reproduce your work reliably then you can't maintain it. You may get by for a while with ad-hoc build/release/deployment processes, but sooner or later they'll bite you. We'll present a new practical approach to assembling both software products and installed systems, drawing inspiration from sources including the functional programming community, commercial software projects, large IT deployments, and Linux distributions like Debian. Slides available at http://apters.com/osbridge2011.pdf
Cooking
Jamey Sharp, Josh Triplett

* Cookies are Bad for You: Improving Security on the Web

Almost every web application relies on cookies to authenticate each request after the user logs in. Cookies are vulnerable to cross-site request forgery and session hijacking. It is time to explore better, more secure alternatives that are now possible thanks to practical in-browser cryptography.
Chemistry
Jesse Hallett

* Getting Started with FPGAs and HDLs

Lots of attention has been given to GPUs for speeding up certain types of computations. While GPUs are very well suited for vector operations, there are other things they are not so well suited for. FPGAs (Field Programmable Gate Arrays) are not used as widely yet, but they offer a much more flexible computing fabric than GPUs. You can implement a GPU in an FPGA, for example, or you could implement your own custom processor optimized for very specialized tasks. The barrier to entry can be high for FPGAs: how does a person with a software development background get started using them? And what about HDLs (Hardware Description Langauges) used to program FPGAs? What's the difference between simulation and synthesis? What kinds of tools are freely available? These are some of the questions that will be addressed in this session.
Cooking
Phil Tomson

* Growing Food with Open Source

Open source folks are naturally lazy. Anything mundane task they can automate, they will. So what does an open source developer do when faced with planning, planting, and tediously watering a garden? Automate!
Hacks
Sarah Sharp

* How to Ask for Money

Have a project that just needs some cash to get off the ground? Need someone to fund beer and food for an event? Have a great idea and want to get paid for implementing it? Come find out how we did it.
Business
Selena Deckelmann, J Chris Anderson, Teyo Tyree

* Inviting Contributors to Open Source Webdev through Virtualization

The bar to contribution in Open Source web development projects can be lowered through the use of devops tools and virtual machine technologies.
Cooking
Les Orchard

* Law is Code, and We're Here to Open Source It

Anyone can show how to save the world. We tell how to receive unsolicited love letters while doing it.
Culture
Robb Shecter, Lisa Hackenberger

* Learn Tech Management In 45 Minutes

It took me two years to get a master's in tech management. I save you $40K and give you the short version.
Business
Sumana Harihareswara

* Marketing: You're Soaking In It!

Come join me as I dispel some of the clouds of pollution which obscure the name of marketing, show how it can help your projects, reveal how--whether you realize it or not--you already use marketing every day and how that's a very good thing indeed.
Business
VM Brasseur

* Online Community Metrics: Tips and Techniques for Measuring Participation

Do you know what people are really doing in your open source project? Having good community data and metrics for your open source project is a great way to understand what works and what needs improvement over time, and metrics can also be a nice way to highlight contributions from key project members. This session will focus on tips and techniques for collecting and analyzing metrics from tools commonly used by open source projects. It's like people watching, but with data.
Culture
Dawn Foster

* Open Source Communities Panel

Learn from open source community leaders who work on projects big and small.
Culture
Audrey Eschright, Asheesh Laroia, Noirin Plunkett, Jane Wells, Chris Strahl

* Open Source GIS Desktop Smackdown

See the leading open source GIS desktop systems solve real world problems.
Chemistry
David Percy, Darrell Fuhriman, Christian Schumann-Curtis

* Seven Habits Of Highly Obnoxious Trolls

Developing more effective habits isn't just for the good guys. We'll discuss seven methodologies that make trolls more effective---and tell you what you can do about it.
Culture
Bart Massey, Selena Deckelmann, Duke Leto

* Snooze, the Totally RESTful Language

As you can see we get a "403 Forbidden" in response to our "POST /integer/5/increment"...can anyone tell me why? It worked when we did "PUT /variable/x/let/integer/5" followed by "POST /variable/x/increment", so why can't we do it directly?
Hacks
Markus Roberts

* Starting and Scaling a Startup Outside of the Silicon Valley

Join Michael Richardson, a cofounder of Urban Airship, as he elaborates on the decisions around creating a startup outside of Silicon Valley, how to keep your head above water, and how to find and manage a team during explosive growth.
Business
Michael Richardson

* The Independent Software Developer

So you love open source? Spend more time doing what you love: go into business for yourself.
Business
Peat Bakke

* The Open Cloud

Why be locked into a cloud vendor? Shouldn't Cloud be Open Cloud and powered by Open Source software? Open Stack is a collection of open source technologies to deliver a cloud operating system. Learn about Open Stack and how to use it to deliver your own Open Source powered clouds.
Cooking
James Turnbull, Eric Day

* User, User, Who Art Thou?

What's going on in the mind of the user as they use your system? Did they choose it, or was it chosen for them? Do they like it or hate it? How can you tell? This talk discusses the types of users that exist, and their motivations.
Cooking
Jacinta Richardson

Open Source Bridge 2010

Favorite sessions for this user

* Open Source Rockets

PSAS is a student aerospace engineering project at Portland State University. We're building ultra-low-cost, open hardware and open source rockets that feature perhaps the most sophisticated amateur rocket avionics systems out there today.
Hacks
Nathan Bergey, Andrew Greenberg

* (CANCELLED) Getting Started with FPGAs and HDLs

Lots of attention has been given to GPUs for speeding up certain types of computations. While GPUs are very well suited for vector operations, there are other things they are not so well suited for. FPGAs (Field Programmable Gate Arrays) are not used as widely yet, but they offer a much more flexible computing fabric than GPUs. You can implement a GPU in an FPGA, for example, or you could implement your own custom processor optimized for very specialized tasks. The barrier to entry can be high for FPGAs: how does a person with a software development background get started using them? And what about HDLs (Hardware Description Langauges) used to program FPGAs? What's the difference between simulation and synthesis? What kinds of tools are freely available? These are some of the questions that will be addressed in this session.
Cooking
Phil Tomson

* A day in the life of Facebook Operations

A look at the tools and practices used at Facebook to support the #2 site in the world.
Cooking
Tom Cook

* Agile User Experience Design

Agile processes can be very successful for both clients and developers, but the rapid pace and the lack of detailed long-term plans can make it difficult to design and build high quality user experiences. We'll talk about good ways to do that.
Cooking
Randall Hansen

* Cassandra: Strategies for Distributed Data Storage

Cassandra is an open source, highly scalable distributed database that brings together Dynamo's fully distributed design and Bigtable's ColumnFamily-based data model. In this talk we'll discuss the strategies Cassandra employs to provide an eventually consistent data model.
Chemistry
Kelvin Kakugawa

* Copyright lawyers can Gödel

"This compression algorithm is of course very inefficient, at least when applied to a small collection of documents. But if you were to apply it to a larger collection, say, all the music ever recorded and all movies ever made, some gains may be realized...
Hacks
Markus Roberts

* Creating Embedded Linux Products with OpenEmbedded

Learn about the current state of embedded Linux distributions and advantages of the OpenEmbedded framework for developing Linux-based products.
Cooking
Scott Garman

* eBooks, ePub, iPad, Kindle, o-my

Print is dead. Well, not dead yet. But it'll be stone dead in a moment.
Chemistry
Lennon Day-Reynolds

* Fixing SSL security: Supplementing the certificate authority model

The most common way of using SSL/TLS encryption relies on a public-key infrastructure that puts near-absolute trust in a large number of entities around the world, any one of which could accidentally or deliberately empower anyone to impersonate any site or service and spy on all of our communications. We've seen that these certificate authorities can make mistakes. We need new mechanisms to meaningfully double-check that they're doing the right thing.
Hacks
Seth Schoen

* Free Speech, Free Software Across the World

How does free software help defend free speech in repressive regimes? Danny O'Brien will draw from the records of the Committee to Protect Journalists to explore how open source can help those at the cutting edge of free expression.
Culture
Danny O'Brien

* Hacking Space Exploration

From creating remote-sensing CubeSats to analyzing aerogel: how the public is hacking into open source space exploration.
Culture
Ariel Waldman

* Infrastructure as Code

Learn how to manage your infrastructure as source code - from provisioning to application deployment and everything in between.
Cooking
Adam Jacob

* Listening to Data - Sonification Using Open Source Tools

Hearing your data - exploratory data analysis by way of algorithmic composition
Hacks
M. Edward (Ed) Borasky

* Moonlighting in Sunlight – How to work on independent projects and have a day job.

Best practices for employers, employees and open source projects to coexist without legal conflicts.
Business
Paula Holm Jensen, Marc Alifanz

* Multicore Haskell Now!

Multicore computers are here: is your programming language ready?
Hacks
Don Stewart

* Professional JavaScript

JavaScript is a unique and powerful language. Its ubiquity in the browser and its elegant concurrency model make JavaScript an ideal tool in a number of situations. Learn about the best ways to use and to understand this language from a full-time JavaScript professional.
Chemistry
Jesse Hallett

* Serialist: lazy web-crawling in Haskell

Serialist (http://serialist.net/) provides a way to find, track and read serialized content (e.g., web comics). It's implemented entirely in Haskell and demonstrates functional web application development, crawling, scraping and distributed architecture. Serialist uses interesting graph algorithms to add and step through content lazily.
Hacks
Jamey Sharp, Josh Triplett

* SuperSpeed me: USB 3.0 Open Source Support

USB 3.0 promises a 10x speedup and better power management than USB 2.0. But how do these devices actually work? Is there open source support for them? Come learn about these fast new devices that are finally hitting the market.
Chemistry
Sarah Sharp

* The Fine Line Between Creepy and Fun

Social software is kind of a big deal right now. In the open-source spirit of transparency and dissection, let's talk about what makes social technology creepy, what makes it fun, and how to hack things to maximize your desired outcome.
Hacks
Audrey Eschright

* The Naive Developer's Guide to Venture Capital

What you need to know before you even think about raising venture or angel capital, presented by a Silicon Valley founder who raised $9m from top tier firms.
Business
Joyce Park

* The Second Step: HOWTO encourage open source work at for-profits

Even at pro-FLOSS businesses, logistical obstacles and incentive problems get in the way of giving back. I'll show you how to fix that.
Business
Sumana Harihareswara

* Unlikely tools for pair programming

Co-conspirators Jamey Sharp and Josh Triplett get up to a lot of miscellaneous hacking mischief together. Much of this hacking occurs while staring at the same screen, and tag-teaming the keyboard. Sometimes this happens with the two of them in different places. We'll demo our favorite tools and invite audience contributions to the discussion.
Cooking
Jamey Sharp, Josh Triplett

* When Everything Looks Like A Nail

Markus: Nautilus? I thought you said noodle house! Matt: Wait, wait, I think I see her head!! Markus: Are you sure? Matt: Maybe It's Not Her Head...
Hacks
Markus Roberts, Matt Youell

* X Marks the Spot: Applying OpenStreetMap to the High Seas

The United States has a treasure trove of nautical charts in digital form, including plots of shipwrecks, navigation buoys, coastal and river depths, and other fine booty. OpenStreetMap is an open source, open format collaborative project for building a free map of the world. Join this session to find out more of the marine secrets of the National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), OpenSeaMap's plans to extend OSM to the high seas, and splicing the two (and your mainbrace) together. We'll use the Geospatial Data Abstraction Library (GDAL), OGR, Python, and the OSM API.
Hacks
Liz Henry, Danny O'Brien

Favorite proposals for this user

* 'Open Source Business Models' and other mythical creatures

A humorous look at the taxonomy of Open Source ecosystems and the businesses that support/are supported by them based on one person's reflections and observations on a two years spent building an open source business and selling 'free'.
Business 2010-03-26 03:25:34 +0000
Andrew Clay Shafer

* Application latencies and the crazy things in Linux you can do for them

Is your application latency-sensitive? Deterministic? Real-Time? This talk will take a broad look at tools and techniques in Linux that can help. And answer the question of why Linus calls some of us "crazy".
Chemistry 2010-03-25 22:45:52 +0000
Nivedita Singhvi

* From the Ashes of MetroFi

The Personal Telco Project has been offered a portion of the wireless gear abandoned by the MetroFi muni-wifi failure. We are working on extracting the maximum public benefit from what we ultimately receive.
Hacks 2010-02-24 09:04:44 +0000
Russell Senior

* REPENT!!! FOR THE END OF THE UNIX EPOCH IS NIGH!!!

SINNERS!! HEAR ME!! For too long have you lain contented and SLOTHFUL in the illusion that time is infinite! SOON the UNIX EPOCH will END and numbers will OVERFLOW their confines CLEANSING all in a flood the likes we have not seen since 1901!!! The SINS of your 32 BITS will chase your children and your children's children unless you REPENT NOW and cleanse your code of the 2038 BUG!!
Chemistry 2010-03-26 00:33:39 +0000
Michael Schwern