Jamey Sharp

Jamey is climbing the halls

Biography

Jamey Sharp was placed on Ritalin, briefly, in fifth grade. His interests and activities have been varied ever since. His biggest projects have been the Portland State Aerospace Society, a student rocketry club at Portland State University; XCB, a new low-level binding to the X protocol, in the process of replacing Xlib; and Comic Rocket, because his other projects didn’t leave him enough time to read his favorite webcomics without tool support.

Jamey’s interests span computer science fields including cryptography, combinatorial search, compilers, and computational complexity; systems-level programming, such as file format and network protocol implementations, Linux kernel development, and boot-loader hacking; computer architecture and its impact on software design; and functional programming, preferably in Haskell.

Open Source Bridge 2015

Sessions for this user

* Trustworthy software in the real world

Software is made of bugs, yet software is controlling a growing part of our physical world. As bugs and security holes become potentially life-threatening, what can we do to make our software worthy of the trust we're placing in it? Take quadcopters, for example. Toy vehicles are not just in specialty hobby shops but even in supermarkets; sports stadiums and the White House are trying to find ways to keep them out; and everyone from agriculture startups to Amazon wants to use them commercially. Quadcopters are becoming safety and security critical systems, but how are we going to make them truly safe and secure? I'll present SMACCMPilot, a BSD-licensed high-assurance quadcopter autopilot, and the new tools and technologies that make it feasible to trust a large piece of software.
Hacks
Jamey Sharp

Open Source Bridge 2014

Sessions for this user

* The 20,000km view: How GPS works

GPS is more than just letting your phone tell you where you are. I believe GPS is a contender for "most amazing piece of engineering in the history of humanity", and I'll show you why.
Chemistry
Jamey Sharp

Open Source Bridge 2011

Sessions for this user

* Composing Software Systems

If you can't reproduce your work reliably then you can't maintain it. You may get by for a while with ad-hoc build/release/deployment processes, but sooner or later they'll bite you. We'll present a new practical approach to assembling both software products and installed systems, drawing inspiration from sources including the functional programming community, commercial software projects, large IT deployments, and Linux distributions like Debian. Slides available at http://apters.com/osbridge2011.pdf
Cooking
Jamey Sharp, Josh Triplett

Open Source Bridge 2010

Sessions for this user

* Serialist: lazy web-crawling in Haskell

Serialist (http://serialist.net/) provides a way to find, track and read serialized content (e.g., web comics). It's implemented entirely in Haskell and demonstrates functional web application development, crawling, scraping and distributed architecture. Serialist uses interesting graph algorithms to add and step through content lazily.
Hacks
Jamey Sharp, Josh Triplett

* Unlikely tools for pair programming

Co-conspirators Jamey Sharp and Josh Triplett get up to a lot of miscellaneous hacking mischief together. Much of this hacking occurs while staring at the same screen, and tag-teaming the keyboard. Sometimes this happens with the two of them in different places. We'll demo our favorite tools and invite audience contributions to the discussion.
Cooking
Jamey Sharp, Josh Triplett

Proposals for this user

* On predicting predictors: hacking archive formats for fun and prophecy

We aim to inform you about the archive formats you use every day. We will include an in-depth look at the tar, ar, cpio, gzip, bzip2, and deb formats, as well as the internals of the Git object store. Armed with this information, we will show you a practical application: removing the redundancy between files in version control and distributions of source and binaries.
Chemistry 2010-02-20 09:54:33 +0000
Jamey Sharp, Josh Triplett

* Socket handoff: Concurrent fd sharing for performance and innovation

When different components want to use a shared resource in different ways--such as when they're implemented in different programming languages, or have APIs that aren't trivially compatible--the result is an API design challenge. X desktops today have both Xlib and XCB competing for access to the same network socket, and we needed a design that would let them share. We'll present this design, how we arrived at it, and why it's even more useful than we guessed.
Cooking 2010-02-21 06:39:44 +0000
Jamey Sharp, Josh Triplett