Clayton Parker's favorites

Open Source Bridge 2011

Favorite sessions for this user

* A Dozen Databases in 45 Minutes

What OSS database to use is an important decision, but recently languishing in the shadow of the sexier "what framework should I use" talks - or underplayed as though the battle were only SQL v noSQL. If your understanding of data storage tops out at "Mongo is webscale" or "mysql + memcached = win" then this talk is for you.
Cooking
Eric Redmond

* Cookies are Bad for You: Improving Security on the Web

Almost every web application relies on cookies to authenticate each request after the user logs in. Cookies are vulnerable to cross-site request forgery and session hijacking. It is time to explore better, more secure alternatives that are now possible thanks to practical in-browser cryptography.
Chemistry
Jesse Hallett

* Designing Error Aggregation Systems

So often we’re solely focused on the performance of our production systems. When disaster strikes, your team needs to know when error conditions begin, where they’re coming from, frequency, and an indication of the last time they occurred. Parsing logs isn’t fast enough, and email can’t keep up or preserve metadata.
Cooking
Gavin McQuillan

* ePUB - What, Why, and How

ePUB is the open e-book standard. Building on previous open standards, the ePUB format allows for flexible and flowing documentation, perfect for viewing on a variety of devices where the forced page sizing of other formats fails. We'll crack open some ePUB files and take a look at the innards and then we'll check out some tools to make ePUB generation less painful.
Cooking
Jason LaPier

* Growing Food with Open Source

Open source folks are naturally lazy. Anything mundane task they can automate, they will. So what does an open source developer do when faced with planning, planting, and tediously watering a garden? Automate!
Hacks
Sarah Sharp

* Hacker Dojo: Anarchy with Respect

Imagine an open source project was an actual place: a place where people volunteer to make something better; contribute their time, knowledge and resources; a place to share ideas or just to get work done. Hacker Dojo is for hackers and thinkers and this session will describe how the open source ethos can successfully be applied to a physical space.
Culture
Kitt Hodsden

* Improving Estimates for Web Projects

How many times have you received an email or phone call from a potential client who describes their project in a few sentences and expects a formal proposal the next day? This session will address this seemingly impossible task by going over the method we have created at OpenSourcery to estimate web projects. This method has helped us work with clients to prioritize functionality, set realistic schedules, and has improved our ability to close sales.
Business
Alex Kroman

* Inviting Contributors to Open Source Webdev through Virtualization

The bar to contribution in Open Source web development projects can be lowered through the use of devops tools and virtual machine technologies.
Cooking
Les Orchard

* IRL: How Do Geeks Undermine Their Presentations and Conversations with Body Language

Many geeks are uncomfortable interacting IRL with clients or audiences but you don't have to be. There are some simple physical tricks to keeping an audience (of 1 or 1k) engaged and not undermining your skills and yourself.
Hacks
Sarah Novotny

* Morning Keynote - Hacking for Freedom

The last year has shown the Internet and computers to be a major force for freedom and self-determination around the world. The presenter discusses his work as a hacktivist. Working with Anonymous and Telecomix, he has helped organized protests in support of WikiLeaks, provided communications support to Egypt and the Middle East, and generally fought the good fight.
Culture
Peter Fein

* No More Joins

Everything you learned about database modeling is wrong. At least for document databases like CouchDB and MongoDB. Learn about these differences, the trade-offs, the use cases, and put it all in practice in a discussion about a real-life document database problem. Unlearn SQL habits and relax.
Cooking
Nuno Job, J Chris Anderson, Roger Bodamer

* Qs on Queues

Not sure what queuing system to use for your next project? How about the differences between broker vs direct queue services? What is a good fit for cloud vs your own data center? This session gathers information from open source queuing projects to help answer these questions and more. Queues are part of almost every scalable website and application, it's time to find the best fit for yours.
Chemistry
Eric Day

* Seven Habits Of Highly Obnoxious Trolls

Developing more effective habits isn't just for the good guys. We'll discuss seven methodologies that make trolls more effective---and tell you what you can do about it.
Culture
Bart Massey, Selena Deckelmann, Duke Leto

* Testing Antipatterns

Tests are great - except when they aren't. Learn how to avoid writing tests that are more trouble than they're worth.
Cooking
Matt Robinson

Open Source Bridge 2009

Favorite sessions for this user

* Assholes are killing your project

The strength of your community is the best predictor of your project's long-term viability. What happens when your community is gradually infiltrated by assholes, who infect everyone else with their constant negativity and personal attacks? This talk will teach you about the dramatic impact assholes are having on your organization today and will show you how you can begin to repair it.
Culture
Donnie Berkholz

* Command-Line Kung Fu: White Belt

Come and learn some useful command-line short cuts and shell idioms that will make you vastly more productive in a Linux or Unix shell. Time permitting, we'll even play "stump the expert", so bring your thorniest shell problems.
Cooking
Hal Pomeranz

* Effective code sprinting

Code sprints are events where developers quickly complete coding tasks in a collaborative environment. A panel of skilled developers will share their experiences for organizing effective code sprints so you can better participate and organize your own. The panel members have organized and participated in over a hundred sprints (ranging from Django to JRuby) and used sprints as the primary way to develop community-oriented projects (e.g., Calagator). While most of the discussion will be about volunteer-run open source code sprints, many of the ideas will be readily applicable to improving development at your workplace. The panel will offer practical, actionable advice that you can use and answer your questions.
Culture
Igal Koshevoy, Reid Beels, Audrey Eschright

* Friday Unconference Kickoff & Scheduling

Welcome to the unconference day.
Culture
Audrey Eschright, Selena Deckelmann, Chris Messina

* Get Off Your Asana and Move!

This is a yoga workshop for anyone who sits and works on computers a lot. You will learn breathing exercises and physical postures that can be done at anytime to help maintain a healthy body and clear mind. Suggestions will be included for how to modify stretches to protect injuries and provide gentle opening.
Culture
Sherri Koehler

* How Idealist.org uses technology to change the world

Idealist.org's mission is to help change the world by providing proactive people, communities, and organizations with a forum to connect and communicate.
Culture
Michel Pelletier

* Layers of Caching: Key to scaling your website

Caching is essential to ensuring that your website will survive a large spike in traffic. With so many different forms of caching, how are you supposed to know what works and why you should use it? The key is layering your site with several forms of caching.
Chemistry
Lance Albertson, Narayan Newton

* Open Source Development - The Dark Side

Navigating the Darkside of the Open Source Development Community. A decidedly sarcastic and hopefully humorous look at the dark under-belly of the Open Source Development Culture.
Culture
Jennifer Redman

* Practical Paper Prototyping

Paper prototyping is the fastest, cheapest way to test your user interface designs. To prove it, in 45 minutes we'll walk through several rounds of prototyping and testing a small application.
Cooking
Randall Hansen

* Programming patterns in sed

Learn to turn line noise into clean and structured, albeit unreadable, sed programs.
Hacks
Philip Tellis

* Re-factor Your Brain: Meditation for Geeks

Meditation is the ultimate open source tool. You can do it anywhere and it’s free. It requires only your brain and your body. It’s positive effects are numerous, including increased productivity, better problem-solving and a reduction in overall stress. Learn about long-term effects of mediation on the brain, some meditation techniques and how mediation can help you do your job better.
Culture
Christie Koehler

* Teaching System Administration

How would you teach system administration? What important princples and practices would you want students to learn?
Culture
Steve VanDevender

* Thursday Keynotes

Featuring Mayor Sam Adams and Ward Cunningham
Culture
Audrey Eschright, Selena Deckelmann, Ward Cunningham

* Web Server Shootout

Deploying your .com behind nginx so you're ready to handle that flood of users on launch day? Wondering if you should use mod_python, mod_wsgi, or FastCGI to deploy your new Django project? This presentation will present comprehensive and practical benchmarks across a wide variety of metrics to help you make an informed decision.
Chemistry
Michael Schurter

* Your Shell History In The Cloud

Use Google App Engine to harness a lifetime of shell history from any computer with tagging, searching and annotations.
Hacks
Josh Cronemeyer