Kevin Scaldeferri's favorites

Open Source Bridge 2016

Favorite sessions for this user

* An Introduction to OpenSCAD using Legos

Learn 3D modelling with OpenSCAD through an hands-on tutorial for modelling Legos
Practice
Bhaskar Athmanathan

* Bots Not Cattle

"Cattle Not Pets" got us to the first generation of microservice infrastructures. Now it's time for a second generation metaphor: "Bots Not Cattle."
Theory
Josh Berkus

* Exploring Mental Illness With Open Source

Julia Nguyen leads if me, an app to share mental health experiences with loved ones. In doing so, she has explored her insecurities with mental illness, learned how to engage diverse contributors, and developed better software practices with Ruby on Rails and JavaScript. She’ll share the lessons she has learned from transforming a passion project into an open source project. Inclusion takes on many forms in an open source project, including supporting contributors from all types of backgrounds, being empathetic to their project goals, and trusting them to take lead. As a mental health project, if me must also accommodate its contributors who face their own mental health challenges. All open source projects should do the same. Managing people is just as important as managing technical contributions in software.
Culture
Julia Nguyen

* Free Culture in an Expensive World

Money is a common worry, inside the open source community and out, but we often feel uncomfortable discussing it. We’ll talk about why that is and how our social norms around money impact who participates in open source and how they do so. The heart of this talk will be a series of case studies based on interviews with community members covering various economic models for open source, including worker co-ops, grant-funded and academic projects, for-profit business models, crowdfunding campaigns, and all-volunteer projects. We’ll explore the sustainability of each model as well as how they deal with the social pressures outlined in the first part of the talk.
Business
Shauna Gordon-McKeon

* Free Everything: Hacking Content Liberation

Large commercial websites rely on the "network effect" to keep users from exploring alternatives. Putting contributions under an open license can break this effect. This talk will explore hacks to give users control over the content they contribute to commercial websites.
Hacks
Erik Moeller

* Graph Databases WIll Change Your Freakin Life

Most developer have worked with relational DBs like MySQL or PostgreSQL, but for many use cases they aren't the best option. Graph databases have a simpler, more powerful model for handling complex related data. In this talk we'll work with Neo4j to explore the advantages of graph DBs. Attendees will learn the graph model, how graph DBs let you do things that are practically impossible with SQL, and the best options for integrating one into your application -- new or existing.
Practice
Ed Finkler

* Let’s build a CI/CD pipeline

An exploration of the cost and value of CI/CD, and a walkthrough of setting up a CI/CD pipeline.
Practice
Jean de Klerk

* Little Leaks Sink Your Tests

"The tests pass on my machine." "Wait, it was working a minute ago." "Oh, that test is flaky sometimes." Unpredictable tests are toxic for our productivity. They undermine confidence in our code. They encourage us to wallpaper over the immediate problem, rather than fixing the underlying cause. In this presentation, we'll talk about a chief cause of flaky tests: leaky global state.
Practice
Ian Dees

* Micro-services provide some benefits, but at what cost?

Several years ago, there was an architectural paradigm shift toward "micro-services" and away from the "monolithic" application stack. A micro-service architecture comes with scalability and replaceability, among others, but is it worth the time and effort to build it? Is it worth debugging API calls gone wrong? If you're thinking about making this move, have already started, or have already deployed to production, this is an ideal venue to see what others are doing with micro-services.
Theory
Serge Domkowski

* Monitoring Asynchronous Applications

The lure of asynchronous programming is that it will make your application run faster and your code simpler to reason about. So we have our wonderfully efficient non-blocking app; how do we check that it's delivering the goods performance wise?
Practice
Amy Boyle

* Monoids, and Sketches, and CRDTs, oh my!

A (hopefully) accessible introduction to some of the key mathematical concepts that make distributed and streaming computation possible.
Theory
Kevin Scaldeferri

* Open sourced tools for Agent Based Modeling

Agent-based modeling is a technique used to explore both complexity and emergence by simulating individual actors and their actions inside of a system. Think of systems such as the traffic in the city or financial markets where one actor can have an effect on the decisions of others until the system’s direction changes its course. During this survey, you will gain an understanding of open source software available in a variety of languages and how to get started quickly.
Practice
Jackie Kazil

* Overdoing Microservices: how small is too small?

All the cool kids are doing it, but is it possible to have too much of a good thing? I'll present some thoughts about things you can actually measure to decide if you've gone off the deep end with microservices.
Practice
Kevin Scaldeferri

* Type Theory 101

Have you heard about type theory and always wanted to understand the principles behind it, but always thought it was too complicated since it has a lot of Lambda Calculus and algebras? This talk will approach these concepts in a friendly way.
Theory
Hanneli Tavante

* What can the open source software of today learn from the history of software documentation?

In the early years of easily distributable software, technical writers and the documentation that they produced were a crucial part of the software development process. Why? What kinds of contributions did they make, and what might their close cooperation with the programmers of their day teach us about how to manage open source projects better today?
Culture
Jennifer Rondeau

Favorite proposals for this user

* An Insight about GlusterFS and it’s Enforcement Techniques

In this talk, we discuss the internal working of the translators and key architectural components of GlusterFS. Along with that, one can gain a deep insight about the enforcement techniques, few challenges, the current state of GlusterFS, undergoing researches and look forward to how the Gluster community may address those challenges.
Practice 2016-03-18 06:45:10 +0000
Manikandan Selvaganesh

Open Source Bridge 2015

Favorite sessions for this user

* Consequences of an Insightful Algorithm

We have ethical responsibilities when coding. We're able to extract remarkably precise intuitions about an individual. But do we have a right to know what they didn't consent to share, even when they willingly shared the data that leads us there? How do we mitigate against unintended outcomes? In this talk, we'll learn how to build in systematic empathy, integrate practices for examining how our code might harm individuals, and net consequences that can be better for everyone.
Culture
Carina C. Zona

* Good Enough Voter Verification & Other Identity Architecture Schemes for Online Communities

This talk is a deep dive into considerations for Identity Architecture for online communities. It's most specifically applications for political action, civic engagement, or virtual nations. I'll talk about pragmatic solutions for voter verification using the state voter registration database, schemes for peer to peer authentication, offline/online identification, Impartial Identity Architecture to control conflict, and more. The discussion is high level and appropriate for beginners, but there will be links to code and big ideas.
Culture
Ele Mooney

* Hello, my name is __________.

Our personal identity is core to how we perceive ourselves and wish to be seen. All too often, however, applications, databases, and user interfaces are not designed to fully support the diversity of personal and social identities expressed throughout the world.
Cooking
Nova Patch

* Making Docker Actually Work

Workflow and tools to make Docker work the way it should, in production and in development
Cooking
Simon McFarlane

* Morning Keynote — Put Up or Shut Up: An Open Letter to Tech Companies Seeking Diverse Teams

People from marginalized communities struggle to break into tech, clawing our way through a racist, sexist, classist, ableist system only to be fired, quit or just suffer in misery. I’ll explore what it really takes to create a workplace that is truly welcoming of everyone.
Culture
Kronda Adair

* Troubleshooting In Distributed Systems

The shift to microservice and distributed architectures has made software products more flexible and scalable-- and a lot more complex. With so many moving parts, ephemeral conditions and the spectre of partial failure, it can be much more difficult to pinpoint how and why things break. Learn how Logstash, Elasticsearch and Kibana can be used to monitor healthy systems and investigate issues as they pop up, and what we can do outside of software to improve our process of problem-solving.
Chemistry
Megan Baker

* Using Julia & D3 to analyse web performance data

If you've always wanted to play around with D3 or Julia, or both, this talk will get you up to speed very quickly. Using web performance data as the vehicle, and an aim to extract meaningful information from it, we will explore both Julia and D3 and come up with some fun visualizations that may not be possible using only one of these tools.
Chemistry
Philip Tellis

* Why Making a Programming Language is Awesome

Learn about the journey of creating Wake, a modern programming language
Hacks
Michael R Fairhurst

* Your Job is Political: Tech Money in Politics

As much as the personal is political, the old-fashioned political still is too, and companies and individuals made rich by the tech industry and by open source software have been making increasingly direct monetary incursions into U.S. politics. Let's take a look at what policies & politicians our bosses, investors, users and contributors are buying at the local and state levels, with a specific focus on current changes in education policy and future moves in law enforcement.
Business
Kelsey Gilmore-Innis

Favorite proposals for this user

* Building Composable Services

Composable services and tools have been a hot topic lately. Learn why microservices can help bring your ideas to life faster while being more reliable and resilient. We'll show what frameworks and techniques you can use to build composable services and infrastructure, and help you avoid some of the common pitfalls.
Chemistry 2015-03-15 03:24:37 +0000
Noah Kantrowitz

* Machine Learning at Scale: Using Apache Spark and MLlib

A common problem of working with large sets of data is that machine learning tools are not able to scale effectively. Apache Spark is a fast, cluster computing engine that provides a rich toolset for machine learning called MLlib, which solves this problem of scaling.
Chemistry 2015-03-06 23:44:47 +0000
Sarah Guido

Open Source Bridge 2013

Favorite sessions for this user

* !done - Hacking IRC Bots for Distributed Teams

When our company was acquired we needed a way to see everything that was done each day all in one place. Teams were using different methods to do this: standups, written reports, emails and meetings. Nothing stuck. Done reports introduces a simple IRC command: !done. Team members say !done and what they just did. These !dones are put into a daily report. !done becomes a part of everyday at work, not a strained task that’s easily forgotten.
Culture
Amber Case, Aaron Parecki

* Citizenship Online: Open Source Politics

Online deliberation refers to applications which help communities make decisions. This varies from Exploratory deliberation, like Amazon reviews, where an individual makes a decision by consulting their community, to very structured Decision Making deliberations where a community needs to forge a single legally and logically defensible decision.
Culture
Ele Munjeli

* Data & Applications Across the Void :: Distributing Systems

I'll be covering the technology that is now being used for the largest scale systems and how that technology is used, how it is connected, and how it keeps large volumes of data available for everything from genomic research, mass e-commerce processing or keeping medical data safe from loss.
Cooking
Adron Hall

* Expanding Your Empathy

I believe empathy is the core competency that is missing from much of the efforts to push the tech community in a direction towards more diversity of all kinds. Companies, communities and conferences cannot expect everything to magically change until they're willing to go deep and examine the systemic patterns and structures that keep underrepresented communities from feeling safe and welcome in the tech space.
Culture
Kronda Adair

* How My Kids Are Learning to Program By Talking

My children have patiently tolerated a number of teach-STEM-quick schemes their dad has brought home. They've taught robots to dance, created simple animations using Scratch, and, quite frankly, made a lot of poop jokes. What's missing from these programming tools was storytelling. The ones we tried focused either on easy interactivity or expressive power. If only there were a way to combine the two... oh, wait, there was—46 years ago!
Culture
Ian Dees

* Innovating Faster with a Micro-Service Architecture using SBT, Continuous Delivery, and LXC

A case study of the tools and techniques used at Gilt Groupe to develop and deploy a system composed of over 200 micro-services.
Cooking
Kevin Scaldeferri

* Intel Atom for Makers and the DIY Community

Learn about the MinnowBoard, a new open source embedded hardware platform for hackers and makers.
Cooking
Scott Garman

* Just Don't Lick the Cookie: an open discussion about organizational dysfunction

When someone claims a task and then doesn't do anything with it, we call that "licking the cookie." Nobody in their right mind would pick up and eat the licked cookie or finish the project. In this session well talk about common forms of organizational dysfunction, and then facilitate a group discussion about working around, over, under or through organizational dysfunctions you've encountered.
Culture
Kellie Brownell, Sumana Harihareswara

* Keynote — Alex “Skud” Bayley

Keynote by Alex “Skud” Bayley
Culture
Alex Bayley

* Literate Programming for the 21st Century

Knuth advocated writing programs for people, not computers. How does crafting code with literate programming play with quick iterative development? Example heavy session using org-mode's Babel project and progrmming languages with succinct syntax, like Scala and Clojure.
Cooking
Howard Abrams

* Morning Keynote: Ashe Dryden

It's been scientifically proven that more diverse communities and workplaces create better products and the solutions to difficult problems are more complete and diverse themselves. Companies are struggling to find adequate talent. So why do we see so few women, people of color, and LGBTQ people at our events and on the about pages of our websites? Even more curiously, why do 60% of women leave the tech industry within 10 years? Why are fewer women choosing to pursue computer science and related degrees than ever before? Why have stories of active discouragement, dismissal, harassment, or worse become regular news?
Culture
Ashe Dryden

* Open Sourcing Depression

In the spirit of open source, I'd like to shine a spotlight on depression. Not because it's easy, but because it's important. Mental illness affects many of us, but the stigma attached to it dissuades most people from talking about it openly. That's not how we make progress. With this talk, I want to do my part.
Culture
Edward Finkler

* Polling: It's Good Enough for the WWW & It's Good Enough for You

Lately everyone loves pushing: you get push notifications on your iOS device, cloud to device messages on your Android device, and something about web sockets. Pushing seems natural. "Hey! I have some data for you, let me send it to you," says the pusher. Too bad it doesn't scale effectively.
Cooking
Jessica Lynn Suttles

* Remote Pair Programming

Remote Pair Programming: my setup, some advice, and a live demo^H^H stress test
Cooking
Sam Livingston-Gray

* Rust: A Friendly Introduction

Conventional wisdom says that writing high-performance code means working without the safety net of credible compile-time safety checks. Mozilla Research (a community of researchers, engineers, and volunteers) is trying to prove that conventional wisdom wrong by building Rust, a new systems programming language. Rust takes advantage of well-understood programming language technology to combine aggressive compile-time error checking with the high degree of direct control over the machine necessary to write efficient systems programs. By way of examples, I'll teach you how to use Rust to write fast and trustworthy code.
Cooking
Tim Chevalier

* Shall We Play A Game?

In just 1.5 hours, I will help you craft a computer game AI that will consistently beat you and your friends.
Chemistry
Bart Massey

* Simple Questions Should Have Simple Answers

What happens when a project begins to embrace the philosophy that simple questions should have simple answers? Q: Simple to whom? A: Simple to the person asking the question. "Simple questions should have simple answers" has given me a lot of design clarity in my projects. I hope to convince you of its beneficial effects.
Culture
Michael Schwern

* Technology for Development—how open source is changing the developing world, and how the movement can do more

FOSS can be a power for positive social impact in the developing world. Hear about key social impact projects and how the open source community can broaden its focus beyond the needs of western developers.
Culture
Jeff Wishnie

* What Is That Process Doing?

We're surrounded by programs we didn't write. Inevitably they eventually do the wrong thing, or they just don't do what we need, and we want to find out what they are doing. Learn how to spy on the processes you run.
Chemistry
Greg Price

* Where "Small is Beautiful" meets "Big Data"- Empowering Local Communities with Open Hardware

"The future is already here — it's just not very evenly distributed" - Author William Gibson Whether rightly or wrongly so, it has been argued that the "information revolution' has resulted in a wider gap between those with skills and access to digital resources and those who do not. The same can apply to entire communities where language, geography and cultural barriers have created a new world of "Have Nots". The growing civic hacker movement is making long strides towards eliminating the "silicon ceiling" effect, but thanks to the emerging practice of "open hardware" the "civic hacker" is joined by a new class known as the "maker"... The civic hacker is capable of great things, and already has enough of a track record to be proud of. But the hacker ultimately is, and should remain, part of a vanguard elite who like the Bletchley Park codebreakers of WWII possess skills of such value that the work of a single individual can have a direct impact on the outcome of a war (or election...) The "Maker" on the other hand represents a fundamental break from a passive society of consumers into something more closely resembling the small-scale producers and artisans on which the U.S was based on.
Culture
Andrew Jawitz

Open Source Bridge 2012

Favorite sessions for this user

* <Your Favorite Programming Language> Loses

Every programming language ever created has some horrible mistakes: your favorite is no exception. We'll talk about some fundamental principles of PL design and how they fail to play out in various real languages.
Chemistry
Bart Massey

* Dread Free Continuous Deployment Using Dreadnot

Learn how to use Dreadnot, an open source deployment orchestration tool creating using Node.js and Twitter Bootstrap, to integrate with a variety of integration and infrastructure tools to enable rolling deployments with the click of a button.
Cooking
Russell Haering

* How Not to Release Software

You've seen a million best practice talks. This is quite the opposite: I'll instruct you in the ways I've failed over twenty years of software development, and advise you how not to make the same mistakes.
Business
Laura Thomson

* How We Went Remote

Hiring remote workers is great for filling those holes on the team...but if you don't have the correct infrastructure in place you're just setting yourself--and your remote team members--up for a world of hurt. This session will detail how our engineering department went remote and thrived because of it.
Business
VM Brasseur

* Keynote: Fear, Uncertainty, and Dopamine

Beer, cookies, psychopathy, happiness, regret—these are all things the world's greatest scientists have studied in detail. Learn how humans work, and how to get the most out of interacting with them.
Culture
Paul Fenwick

* Practical Lessons from Exotic Languages

Esoteric programming languages never really get the attention they deserve in the mainstream programming culture. We'll examine idioms from several exotic languages and explain how they can improve the quality of more common codebases.
Cooking
Corbin Simpson

* Put the "Ops" in "Dev": What Developers Need to Know About DevOps

How thinking about operations can help you make your code better, stronger, and faster.
Cooking
Greg Lund-Chaix, Lance Albertson, Rudy Grigar, Kenneth Lett

* What the Hell Is Wrong with You People? Pushing Change Across an Organization from the Basement Office

You have a great idea, perhaps the best idea ever, but you work with a bunch of know-it-alls, scaredy cats, well poisoners and lazy asses. You need a project management cycle that praises, emboldens, listens and inspires. You need a project management cycle that works.
Business
Chris Chiacchierini, Chris Langford

Open Source Bridge 2011 Birds of a Feather

Favorite sessions for this user

* Functional Languages BoF [pdxfunc]

Hang out and talk about functional languages.
BOF
Igal Koshevoy, Dan Colish, David Lazar

Open Source Bridge 2011

Favorite sessions for this user

* "Why did you do that?" You're more automated than you think.

Your brain is really good at surviving in neolithic Africa, but not because of our powers of higher levels of thought; they're much too slow. Humans are so successful as a species because we're champions at automating things, including our own thoughts and behaviours. What's fascinating is that we're profoundly unaware of just how much our own lives run on automatic, and just how much our own behaviour is influenced by external factors. Join internationally acclaimed speaker Paul Fenwick as we examine the fascinating world of the human mind.
Culture
Paul Fenwick

* Composing Software Systems

If you can't reproduce your work reliably then you can't maintain it. You may get by for a while with ad-hoc build/release/deployment processes, but sooner or later they'll bite you. We'll present a new practical approach to assembling both software products and installed systems, drawing inspiration from sources including the functional programming community, commercial software projects, large IT deployments, and Linux distributions like Debian. Slides available at http://apters.com/osbridge2011.pdf
Cooking
Jamey Sharp, Josh Triplett

* Data Science in the Open

Data Science promises to transform ubiquitous and cheap data into insights with the potential for great social, scientific and personal value. I will provide a lightning tour of high level theory, concepts, and tools to extract knowledge and value from data.
Cooking
John Taylor

* Designing Error Aggregation Systems

So often we’re solely focused on the performance of our production systems. When disaster strikes, your team needs to know when error conditions begin, where they’re coming from, frequency, and an indication of the last time they occurred. Parsing logs isn’t fast enough, and email can’t keep up or preserve metadata.
Cooking
Gavin McQuillan

* Doing NoSQL with SQL

How to use the new NO-SQL MariaDB features from SQL.
Chemistry
Sarah Novotny

* Gearman: From the Worker's Perspective

Many people view topics like Map/Reduce and queue systems as advanced concepts that require in-depth knowledge and time consuming software setup. Gearman is changing all that by making this barrier to entry as low as possible with an open source, distributed job queuing system.
Chemistry
Brian Aker

* GraphViz: The Open-Source Body Scanner for Code, Systems, and Data

Do you generate, manage, or analyze a lot of data? Do you develop software? Do you like pretty pictures? If your answer was "yes" to zero or more of these questions, this talk is for you.
Chemistry
Matt Youell

* IRL: How Do Geeks Undermine Their Presentations and Conversations with Body Language

Many geeks are uncomfortable interacting IRL with clients or audiences but you don't have to be. There are some simple physical tricks to keeping an audience (of 1 or 1k) engaged and not undermining your skills and yourself.
Hacks
Sarah Novotny

* Law is Code, and We're Here to Open Source It

Anyone can show how to save the world. We tell how to receive unsolicited love letters while doing it.
Culture
Robb Shecter, Lisa Hackenberger

* Learn Tech Management In 45 Minutes

It took me two years to get a master's in tech management. I save you $40K and give you the short version.
Business
Sumana Harihareswara

* Morning Keynote - Hacking for Freedom

The last year has shown the Internet and computers to be a major force for freedom and self-determination around the world. The presenter discusses his work as a hacktivist. Working with Anonymous and Telecomix, he has helped organized protests in support of WikiLeaks, provided communications support to Egypt and the Middle East, and generally fought the good fight.
Culture
Peter Fein

* Open Source: Open to whom?

What makes the culture of open source so hostile to women and how can we as individuals act to change it?
Culture
Valerie Aurora

* Preventing Runtime Errors at Compile Time

Are you tired of null pointer exceptions, unintended side effects, SQL injections, concurrency errors, mistaken equality tests, and other run-time errors that appear during testing or in the field? A compile-time tool named the Checker Framework has found hundreds of such errors. Oracle plans to include it in the Java 8 javac, but you can use it today to improve your code and avoid errors.
Cooking
David Lazar, Michael Ernst, Werner Dietl

* Pulling the Plug

In order to keep a tree healthy, you have to prune its branches. This too is the case with an organization’s websites and projects. Let’s look at how Mozilla handles the end-of-life portion of a website’s life-cycle.
Business
Ryan Snyder

* Put THAT in Your Pipe and Deploy It!

A deployment pipeline combines several development best practices, fully automated and taken to their logical extreme. The result is almost magical: changesets go in one end, and fully-tested software packages come out the other. We'll take a tour of the components of a deployment pipeline, with concrete examples showing how to use Hudson, Rake, and Puppet to deploy PHP projects.
Cooking
David Brewer

* Qs on Queues

Not sure what queuing system to use for your next project? How about the differences between broker vs direct queue services? What is a good fit for cloud vs your own data center? This session gathers information from open source queuing projects to help answer these questions and more. Queues are part of almost every scalable website and application, it's time to find the best fit for yours.
Chemistry
Eric Day

* Starting and Scaling a Startup Outside of the Silicon Valley

Join Michael Richardson, a cofounder of Urban Airship, as he elaborates on the decisions around creating a startup outside of Silicon Valley, how to keep your head above water, and how to find and manage a team during explosive growth.
Business
Michael Richardson

* Technical Debt

Technical debt is something that most project teams or independent developers have to deal with - we take shortcuts to push out releases, deadlines need to be met, quick fixes slowly become the standard. In this talk, we will discuss what technical debt is, when it is acceptable and when it isn't, and strategies for effectively managing it, both on an independent and team level.
Cooking
Elizabeth Naramore

* Testing Antipatterns

Tests are great - except when they aren't. Learn how to avoid writing tests that are more trouble than they're worth.
Cooking
Matt Robinson

* The History of Concurrency

With node.js brining callbacks back into fashion and new languages like Go baking concurrency primitives directly into the language syntax, it can be difficult to keep straight what different concurrency approaches offer, what their shortcomings are, and what inspired them.
Chemistry
Michael Schurter

Open Source Bridge 2009

Favorite sessions for this user

* Advanced Git tutorial: Not your average VCS.

Do you know the basics of Git but wonder what all the hype is about? Do you want the ultimate control over your Git history? This tutorial will walk you through the basics of committing changes before diving into the more advanced and "dangerous" Git commands.
Cooking
Sarah Sharp

* Agile JavaScript Testing

With the recent surge in JavaScript popularity, and the advances in JavaScript virtual machines, serious applications can and are being built in JavaScript. As the sophistication of these apps grow, so grows the need for verifying that our code continues to work as we expect. We'll briefly cover the advantages of test driven development, the reasons for pushing it all the way to the browser level, and then explore the options for testing JavaScript, look at some examples, and then integrate the tests into our existing development workflow.
Cooking
Scott Becker

* Android location services from social networks to games

Adding real-world location to mobile applications on the Android platform takes users out of the ethernet and into the world.
Chemistry
Don Park

* Assholes are killing your project

The strength of your community is the best predictor of your project's long-term viability. What happens when your community is gradually infiltrated by assholes, who infect everyone else with their constant negativity and personal attacks? This talk will teach you about the dramatic impact assholes are having on your organization today and will show you how you can begin to repair it.
Culture
Donnie Berkholz

* Building Scale Free Applications with Hadoop and Cascading

A rapid introduction to Hadoop architecture, MapReduce patterns, and best practices with Cascading.
Cooking
Chris Wensel

* bzr vs git smack down

Selena loves Git and EmmaJane loves Bazaar. And like all good nerds they've spent a fair amount of time talkin' smack about the other's version control system (VCS). Come see what the fuss is all about!
Cooking
EmmaJane Hogbin, Selena Deckelmann

* Clustering Data -- How to Have Fun in n-Dimensions

The amount of information freely available on the internet from sources like Twitter and Github grows every day. This gives us new opportunities to leverage the collective consciousness. Clustering is a wonderful method for finding useful information in large amounts of data. But it can be an intimidating topic for programmers without a lot of academic background. In this talk I will introduce and explain some practical techniques for clustering real-world data.
Cooking
Jesse Hallett

* Deploying to the Edge from CouchDB

CouchDB can serve standalone applications, which can be shared amongst users, putting the source code (and control) back in their hands.
Hacks
J Chris Anderson

* Drizzle, Rethinking MySQL for the Web

Rethinking MySQL for the modern web.
Chemistry
Brian Aker

* Drop ACID and think about data

Survey of current database technologies beyond the traditional ACID RDBMS
Chemistry
Bob Ippolito

* Faking It Til I Make It: A Woman On The Fringe Of Open Source

As a long-time user of open source software, I've often considered myself an advocate but not necessarily a participant. Over the last year and a half, my own search for technical inspiration has led me full-circle to the realization that I'm an active member of a vibrant community of technical women.
Culture
Maria Webster

* Get Off Your Asana and Move!

This is a yoga workshop for anyone who sits and works on computers a lot. You will learn breathing exercises and physical postures that can be done at anytime to help maintain a healthy body and clear mind. Suggestions will be included for how to modify stretches to protect injuries and provide gentle opening.
Culture
Sherri Koehler

* HOWTO earn an open source living without taking on investors or selling your soul

Earning a living from open source software? Yes, we can. Let's talk about what actually works (and what doesn't work) for building a service business based not just on open source software, but with an open source philosophy, drawing on real world experience.
Business
Brian Jamison

* Layers of Caching: Key to scaling your website

Caching is essential to ensuring that your website will survive a large spike in traffic. With so many different forms of caching, how are you supposed to know what works and why you should use it? The key is layering your site with several forms of caching.
Chemistry
Lance Albertson, Narayan Newton

* My Grand Experiment: A Portland Women-focused Tech Group.

The idea for Code-n-Splode grew out of the Women in Open Source BOF at OSCON 2007. I'll talk about my original reasons for starting a women-friendly tech group, how the group is evolving, and what I've learned.
Culture
gabrielle roth

* New Ways for Teaching Children Software Programming

Software programming has come a long way for students and younger children since the days of Logo. Syntax has been replaced with connecting blocks and the triangle turtle has been replaced with custom artwork children create themselves. Now, multi-threading and event processing are easier to teach children than functions, and this session discusses these ideas as well as so the edge of kid code.
Culture
Howard Abrams

* Open Source Development - The Dark Side

Navigating the Darkside of the Open Source Development Community. A decidedly sarcastic and hopefully humorous look at the dark under-belly of the Open Source Development Culture.
Culture
Jennifer Redman

* Project Management Should be Boring!

Many people see project management as the art of trying to please everyone and pleasing no one, while trying not to go too far over deadline and too far over budget. It doesn't have to be that way. Good project management can be so predictable and reliable that it's almost boring. Here's what works in real projects.
Cooking
Chromatic X

* Spindle, Mutilate and Metaprogram: How far _can_ you push it before there be dragons?

Maybe the edge isn’t as close as we thought it was. Maybe you can do some really funky things with your language without accidentally summoning eldritch spirits. Or maybe not. The only way to find out is to try it—or, if you are of the more prudent proclivities, to watch someone else try it.
Hacks
Markus Roberts, Matt Youell

* Thursday Keynotes

Featuring Mayor Sam Adams and Ward Cunningham
Culture
Audrey Eschright, Selena Deckelmann, Ward Cunningham

* Wednesday Welcome and Keynotes

Featuring Amber Case, Cyborg Anthropologist, and Kurt von Finck of Monty Program AB.
Culture
Audrey Eschright, Selena Deckelmann, Amber Case, Kurt von Finck

* Write your own Bayesian Classifier: An Introduction to Machine Learning

Can you perform simple arithmetic? Do you know how to program well enough to open and read files? Then you can write a Bayesian classifier, one of the machine learning techniques for predicting categories, most famous for its use in spam filters. Let's demystify this impressively-named but ultimately simple process.
Cooking
John Melesky