ben hengst's favorites

Open Source Bridge 2013

Favorite sessions for this user

* Citizenship Online: Open Source Politics

Online deliberation refers to applications which help communities make decisions. This varies from Exploratory deliberation, like Amazon reviews, where an individual makes a decision by consulting their community, to very structured Decision Making deliberations where a community needs to forge a single legally and logically defensible decision.
Culture
Ele Munjeli

* Data journalism

We're creating educational materials for the next generation of news-application developers to dig into open data and open government.
Culture
DAVID STANTON

* FAIL is Not a Four-Letter Word

Projects fail. Companies crash and burn. Screws fall out all the time; the world is an imperfect place. Just because it happens doesn’t mean we can’t do our best to prevent it or—at the very least—to minimize the damage when it does. As a matter of fact, embracing failure can be one of the best things you do for your organization.
Culture
VM Brasseur

* How to multiply small integers while <del>Markus</del> human

Thank you! I'm glad someone read the description of this talk on line and remembered to answer Aardvark -- if you hadn't done that, the excerpt wouldn't have actually been part of the talk, and the very fabric of reality could have been threatened!
Chemistry
Markus Roberts

* Lessons From X

Lessons I've learned from 25 years of participation in perhaps the longest-running end-user-facing Open Source project.
Culture
Bart Massey

* More Code, More Problems

Some people will tell you that you need a large, full-stack framework to do web development The Right Way. These people are wrong.
Cooking
Edward Finkler

* My First Year of Pull Requests

Open source folks are passionate about the tools they make and want others to get involved. Yet, in the past year that I've been developing software full time, I've seen a wide variety of responses from maintainers. On one hand, I've been inspired by the Travis-CI maintainer who followed up with my bug report over several weeks, on the other hand, my pull request to JDBC has lain fallow.
Culture
Fiona Tay

* No, I Won't Contribute to Your Open Source Project

The growth of the open community is inspiring. Yet despite this, most projects find it remarkably difficult to get people to contribute. Why?
Culture
VM Brasseur

* Open Sourcing Depression

In the spirit of open source, I'd like to shine a spotlight on depression. Not because it's easy, but because it's important. Mental illness affects many of us, but the stigma attached to it dissuades most people from talking about it openly. That's not how we make progress. With this talk, I want to do my part.
Culture
Edward Finkler

* Rust: A Friendly Introduction

Conventional wisdom says that writing high-performance code means working without the safety net of credible compile-time safety checks. Mozilla Research (a community of researchers, engineers, and volunteers) is trying to prove that conventional wisdom wrong by building Rust, a new systems programming language. Rust takes advantage of well-understood programming language technology to combine aggressive compile-time error checking with the high degree of direct control over the machine necessary to write efficient systems programs. By way of examples, I'll teach you how to use Rust to write fast and trustworthy code.
Cooking
Tim Chevalier

* The problem with passwords on the web and what to do about it

Handling user passwords safely is hard, but replacing passwords on the web in a reasonable way is even harder. Really, this should have been in the browser all along. This is where Persona comes in.
Chemistry
François Marier

Favorite proposals for this user

* Git & GitHub for Ninjas

You're a git user, and you love what it does for you. Learn how to take it to the next level, straight from the experts at GitHub.
Cooking 2013-03-06 18:29:41 +0000
Ben Straub

* Open Sourcing Book Publishing

You've got a great idea for a book. You write a publisher. You get accepted! Then you find out that they'll pay you $500 and a 10% royalty for your book rights, in exchange for your heart and soul over the next six months. You're crushed. Is there a better way? There certainly is!
Business 2013-03-06 16:40:03 +0000
Brandon Savage

* Tech, Bikes, Transit & Lifestyle Options to improve your Programming

I'll be diving deep to discuss the benefits of living well to do better programming. I'll talk about the statistics and data behind dropping the auto-dependent mindset and stepping into the world of cycling, meetups, urban living, clean eating and ways to dramatically improve your innovation, entrepreneurial activities and why these things are connected. As I like to say, "How to get and stay at 100%."
Culture 2013-01-17 22:11:34 +0000
Adron Hall

* VoteFair ranking and other fair vote-counting methods

Open-source software is available to bring surveys, rankings, ratings, polls, and organizational elections into the digital era. Yet far too often websites and organizations use voting methods that are no better than the single-mark ballots we use in governmental elections. Alas, when innovative developers take the DIY approach, the results are usually disastrous.
Chemistry 2013-02-28 19:14:40 +0000
Richard Fobes

* What Hath Perl Wrought?

When was the last time you looked at some Perl code? Was it readable? Was it like an archeological expedition, traveling back in time to 1994? Modern Perl is very different from the Perl of our ancestors, and if you've been away for a while, the tools that are available now will blow your mind.
Chemistry 2013-02-19 19:29:48 +0000
Mike Friedman

* Working the System: Secrets of a Hiring Manager

There's no nice way to say it: Job hunting sucks. To succeed you need diligence, strategy and intel on your opponent. Come learn the tech hiring process from the point of view of the person on the other side of the table: the hiring manager.
Business 2013-02-05 19:45:52 +0000
VM Brasseur

* Write, Debug And Tests Apps for FirefoxOS

During this talk Schalk will go over all the bits and pieces you need, and have access to, to not only write apps but, also effectively debug and test your apps before submitting them to the Marketplace or serving them up directly from your own site.
Hacks 2013-01-24 22:44:48 +0000
Schalk Neethling

Open Source Bridge 2012

Favorite sessions for this user

* <Your Favorite Programming Language> Loses

Every programming language ever created has some horrible mistakes: your favorite is no exception. We'll talk about some fundamental principles of PL design and how they fail to play out in various real languages.
Chemistry
Bart Massey

* A Crash Course in Tech Management

'Programmer' and 'Manager' are two different titles for a reason: they're two different jobs and skill sets. If you have managerial aspirations (or have had them foisted upon you), come to this session to learn some of the tricks of the managerial trade.
Business
VM Brasseur

* An Introduction to Luvit

Luvit is a new open source asynchronous framework. We will dive into what this project does, how it works, and what the goals are for the future.
Chemistry
Brandon Philips

* Building and Testing REST APIs in Node.js

Learn about techniques, libraries and patterns useful for building REST APIs using Node.js
Cooking
Russell Haering

* Building Developer Platforms

How do you transform your site or service into a platform others build on top of? How do you clear the path, lower the barriers, and make it easy for new developers to get started?
Chemistry
Scott Becker

* Comparing Open Source Private Cloud Platforms

Private cloud computing has become an integral part of global business. While each platform provides a way for virtual machines to be deployed, implementations vary widely. It can be difficult to determine which features are right for your needs. This session will discuss the top open source private cloud platforms and provide analysis on which one is the best fit for you.
Chemistry
Lance Albertson

* Cutting Through the Crap: The Essence of Content on the Future Web

The mobile revolution has shown us that our content management and web publishing technologies are entangled and flawed. But by thinking deeply and re-examining the essence of our content, we can help to architect a flexible future for the web.
Chemistry
Lyza Gardner

* Dark Arts of Data Storage: What's Your Filesystem up to?

Ever wonder what happens to your data between the write() call and the disk drive? Or feel the need to scrape your bits off the drive after an accident? If so, this talk is for you! Come learn the dark art of how filesystems work.
Chemistry
Darrick Wong

* Design and Command Line Applications

Design has permeated our culture and our tools, but the software you're building doesn't have a graphical interface. That doesn't exempt you from thinking about user experience design! Learn how UX principles apply to even basic command line scripts.
Cooking
Pieter van de Bruggen

* Forking and Refining Data on the Open Web

Github has revolutionized social coding but where does social data stand in relation?
Chemistry
Max Ogden

* How and When to Do It Wrong

Constraints make good art. Everyone knows the right way to design and implement software — but is the wrong way really so bad? This talk demonstrates unconventional approaches to solving common and real problems and explores their benefits and drawbacks.
Hacks
Chromatic X

* How Not to Release Software

You've seen a million best practice talks. This is quite the opposite: I'll instruct you in the ways I've failed over twenty years of software development, and advise you how not to make the same mistakes.
Business
Laura Thomson

* How to Encrypt Your Content on Any Website: Privly

Privly lets you post content on the web (Facebook, Gmail, Twitter, Diaspora, ..., everywhere) without letting host sites have access to your data. Come find out how to un-send emails and manage your data across many websites simultaneously.
Hacks
Sean McGregor, Sanchit Karve, Jennifer Davidson

* How to Win Collaborators and Influence Community: Encouraging (& Not Discouraging) Novice Coders

Interested in helping others learn to code? How do you help give them a running start, without throwing roadblocks in their way? Come get better at helping other people get better.
Culture
Liene Verzemnieks

* Information Radiation and You

Building your company's status board is more than just putting charts on a screen - numbers are just data, whether you write out the digits or plot a squiggly line. Learn to transform your data into information, and let that information instruct you.
Cooking
Pieter van de Bruggen

* Let's Make an IRC Bot

Let's make an IRC bot together. A room of people will either come together, or break up into teams to create an IRC bot within the context of a session. What the bot will do, is up to the people in the room. The outcome is different every time, but it will surely teach us something about technology, and human nature.
Chemistry
Eric Holscher

* Logic Lessons That Last Generations

In the 1980s, my grandfather reached onto the bookshelves of his cigar-smoke-seasoned garage laboratory and pulled down a three-ring binder that would change my life. Come hear how a 50-year-old introduction to binary logic has managed to stay relevant after all these decades, and what it means for our own efforts to teach and document technical subjects.
Culture
Ian Dees

* Open Education Tools for Mentoring and Learning

The internet is full of information. Some of this information was made to help people learn. A subset exists under open licenses. These open educational resources (OERs) are used all over the world for learning and teaching. This talk will cover what some of them are and explore ways they have been (and can be) used for mentors and self-learners--both as individuals and in peer-study groups.
Culture
Molly de Blanc

* Open Source and Intellectual Property - Busting [some of] the Myths

"If it's open source, that means it's public domain, right?" "Well, it's fair use if you only copy 5% of it." "I know, let's get a trademark and then nobody can use our idea!" A discussion of common myths about intellectual property and how it applies to open source.
Business
Paula Holm Jensen

* Practical Lessons from Exotic Languages

Esoteric programming languages never really get the attention they deserve in the mainstream programming culture. We'll examine idioms from several exotic languages and explain how they can improve the quality of more common codebases.
Cooking
Corbin Simpson

* Rise of the Indie Web

Meet the pioneers of the new Indie Web, learn what's changed, and how you too can reclaim your content, your data, your online identity. Join our panelists as they debate a variety of different approaches and learn how you too can get started and join the new Indie Web.
Culture
Tantek Çelik

* Solving Interesting Problems by Writing Parsers

What do you do when you have to parse weird message formats? You write parser! Or, in this case a regular expression. See how I make a moderately challenging problem easy for everyone.
Cooking
Jacinta Richardson

* Supporting Oregon K-12 Education with Open Source

How a partnership between the Oregon Department of Education and Oregon State University is using open source technology to help Oregon's K-12 teachers.
Culture
Greg Lund-Chaix

* Text Lacks Empathy

Have you ever written a nice friendly email and gotten a reply that seems like they read a whole different email? Textual communication has special problems. This talk will help you mitigate them: ensuring that what you mean to say is what is understood; interpreting messages that seem totally out of whack; and increasing empathic bandwidth.
Culture
Michael Schwern, Noirin Plunkett

* Understand "Inform 7" as Teh Awesome.

Y'know those "Interactive Fiction" (IF) text-adventure thingies? Inform 7 is a language for writing IF in the style of English prose. It's also a neat idea for general modeling. Let's build a simple world together while learning some of what Inform 7 is about.
Chemistry
Bart Massey

* Using XMonad for a No-Nonsense, Highly Productive Linux Desktop Experience

Many Linux desktop environments try to be easy to use for the average user, but that's not you. You're at your computer all day writing code; you don't want to mess around with *dragging windows* or (ugh) watching *animated transitions*. David Brewer will demonstrate how by using xmonad, a tiling window manager, you can free yourself from the tyranny of the mouse.
Cooking
David Brewer

* Web Actions: A New Building Block for the Web

A web action is the user experience, code, and service for taking a specific discrete action, across the web, from one site to another site or application. You've all seen the buttons: Share, Read later, Follow, Like, Favorite, etc. More than any one social site or service, web actions are the emergence of a whole new hypermedia building block. This talk will give an overview of the anatomy of a web action, discuss web action user flow, and highlight best practices for both publishers and service providers.
Chemistry
Tantek Çelik

* What Is My Kernel Doing?

Ever wonder what your kernel is doing? We instrumented kernels on both web servers and personal workstations, and then measured to see what they're doing.
Chemistry
Randy Appleton

* What We Talk About When We Talk About Project Management

We ask for a lot of things under the heading of 'project management'. This leads to pain and suffering when we are not clear for what we are asking for, or we're not set up to support what we're asking for. This is particularly special in open source companies and projects.
Business
Amye Scavarda

* Why You Need to Host 100 New Wikis Just for Yourself

The Federated Wiki offers a new form of conversation well suited for charting our collective future.
Culture
Ward Cunningham

* Wireless Communication with an Open Source Software Radio

You use wireless technology every day. Do you want to know how it works?
Chemistry
Jared Boone

* Your Open Source Startup

Are you ready to take your Open Source project to the next level? Maybe it's time for a startup.
Business
Evan Prodromou

* ZenIRCBot and the Art of Pub/Sub

How Pub/Sub helped my IRC bot stop living in the past and live in the moment. Also, special bonus features for polyglots!
Chemistry
Wraithan (Chris McDonald)

Favorite proposals for this user

* API-driven Internal Dashboard -- The devops.json and Gutsy open source projects

Many large systems are composed of smaller, API-driven services. In these service oriented architectures (SOA), developers work in small subteams consuming and producing abstractions. While APIs enhance development efficiency in the normal work-flow, failure cases are often non-standardized, with little to no information provided for operational and development issues such as downtime or developer on-boarding. Implementing internal devops.json endpoints, combined with the Gutsy DevOps Dashboard, significantly improves the cost and quality of outcomes to operational and development problems by enabling information discovery of people and infrastructure.
Culture 2012-03-09 17:04:27 +0000
Lucy Mendel

Open Source Bridge 2011

Favorite sessions for this user

* "Why did you do that?" You're more automated than you think.

Your brain is really good at surviving in neolithic Africa, but not because of our powers of higher levels of thought; they're much too slow. Humans are so successful as a species because we're champions at automating things, including our own thoughts and behaviours. What's fascinating is that we're profoundly unaware of just how much our own lives run on automatic, and just how much our own behaviour is influenced by external factors. Join internationally acclaimed speaker Paul Fenwick as we examine the fascinating world of the human mind.
Culture
Paul Fenwick

* A Dozen Databases in 45 Minutes

What OSS database to use is an important decision, but recently languishing in the shadow of the sexier "what framework should I use" talks - or underplayed as though the battle were only SQL v noSQL. If your understanding of data storage tops out at "Mongo is webscale" or "mysql + memcached = win" then this talk is for you.
Cooking
Eric Redmond

* Cloud Scaling: High Performance Even in Virtualized Environments.

Virtual hosting providers are particularly enticing for startups and new opensource projects, but they come with large and sometimes unexpected drawbacks. Learn what to expect and how to mitigate the worst performance issues you’ll face deploying your services in the cloud.
Hacks
Gavin McQuillan

* Control Emacs with Your Beard: the All-Singing All-Dancing Intro to Hacking the Kinect

See! The Amazing Future of Human-Computer Interaction! Behold! The Awesome Power of Open-Source Libraries and Cheap Video-Game Accessories! Fake Beards!
Hacks
Devin Chalmers, Greg Borenstein

* Designing Error Aggregation Systems

So often we’re solely focused on the performance of our production systems. When disaster strikes, your team needs to know when error conditions begin, where they’re coming from, frequency, and an indication of the last time they occurred. Parsing logs isn’t fast enough, and email can’t keep up or preserve metadata.
Cooking
Gavin McQuillan

* Doing NoSQL with SQL

How to use the new NO-SQL MariaDB features from SQL.
Chemistry
Sarah Novotny

* ePUB - What, Why, and How

ePUB is the open e-book standard. Building on previous open standards, the ePUB format allows for flexible and flowing documentation, perfect for viewing on a variety of devices where the forced page sizing of other formats fails. We'll crack open some ePUB files and take a look at the innards and then we'll check out some tools to make ePUB generation less painful.
Cooking
Jason LaPier

* Gearman: From the Worker's Perspective

Many people view topics like Map/Reduce and queue systems as advanced concepts that require in-depth knowledge and time consuming software setup. Gearman is changing all that by making this barrier to entry as low as possible with an open source, distributed job queuing system.
Chemistry
Brian Aker

* Getting Started with Semantic Web Applications

Leave rigid tables behind, and work with your data as a graph, using standard web data schemas.
Cooking
Leif Warner, Brian Panulla

* Give a Great Tech Talk

Why do so many technical presentations suck? Make sure that yours doesn't. Josh Berkus and Ian Dees will show you how to share your ideas with your audience by speaking effectively and (when the situation warrants it) showing your code.
Culture
Ian Dees, Josh Berkus

* Growing Food with Open Source

Open source folks are naturally lazy. Anything mundane task they can automate, they will. So what does an open source developer do when faced with planning, planting, and tediously watering a garden? Automate!
Hacks
Sarah Sharp

* Hacker Dojo: Anarchy with Respect

Imagine an open source project was an actual place: a place where people volunteer to make something better; contribute their time, knowledge and resources; a place to share ideas or just to get work done. Hacker Dojo is for hackers and thinkers and this session will describe how the open source ethos can successfully be applied to a physical space.
Culture
Kitt Hodsden

* How to Ask for Money

Have a project that just needs some cash to get off the ground? Need someone to fund beer and food for an event? Have a great idea and want to get paid for implementing it? Come find out how we did it.
Business
Selena Deckelmann, J Chris Anderson, Teyo Tyree

* Improving Estimates for Web Projects

How many times have you received an email or phone call from a potential client who describes their project in a few sentences and expects a formal proposal the next day? This session will address this seemingly impossible task by going over the method we have created at OpenSourcery to estimate web projects. This method has helped us work with clients to prioritize functionality, set realistic schedules, and has improved our ability to close sales.
Business
Alex Kroman

* Inclusive Design From The Start

More and more FOSS projects are benefiting from a formal design process. This is an opportunity to see accessibility as a design requirement and integrate into earlier stages of the project's cycle as opposed to the afterthought it often is. In this talk we will see what a design process that integrates universal design looks like, and open the floor to discussion about inclusivity in design.
Cooking
Eitan Isaacson

* IRL: How Do Geeks Undermine Their Presentations and Conversations with Body Language

Many geeks are uncomfortable interacting IRL with clients or audiences but you don't have to be. There are some simple physical tricks to keeping an audience (of 1 or 1k) engaged and not undermining your skills and yourself.
Hacks
Sarah Novotny

* Is your Community Connecting to the Future?

Are you taking the underlying infrastructure that allows you to do the cool stuff you do online for granted? Do you think that ubiquitous, affordable, high speed broadband will just happen? Merger mania in the telecommunications arena means we prosumers will have less and less of a choice in our connectivity options. What role can communities play in ensuring broadband communications infrastructure and connectivity strategies promote openness, and improve accessibility and responsiveness of government to citizens.
Culture
Mary Beth Henry

* Modern Perl Made Painless

Improvements in Perl 5 over the past several years allow great programmers to do great things with less code. You too can turn your Perl 5 code from mere scripting into powerful, clear, and modern programming--with help from a few tools the world's best Perl programmers already know and love.
Cooking
Chromatic X

* No More Joins

Everything you learned about database modeling is wrong. At least for document databases like CouchDB and MongoDB. Learn about these differences, the trade-offs, the use cases, and put it all in practice in a discussion about a real-life document database problem. Unlearn SQL habits and relax.
Cooking
Nuno Job, J Chris Anderson, Roger Bodamer

* Parrot: State of the VM

Parrot is an ambitious and long-lived project that aims to be a VM for interoperable dynamic language implementation. We'll take a look at what Parrot's developers have been doing of late, what kind of awesome goodies we've plundered from the OSS world and where we want to go in the next year.
Chemistry
Christoph Otto

* Pulling the Plug

In order to keep a tree healthy, you have to prune its branches. This too is the case with an organization’s websites and projects. Let’s look at how Mozilla handles the end-of-life portion of a website’s life-cycle.
Business
Ryan Snyder

* Qs on Queues

Not sure what queuing system to use for your next project? How about the differences between broker vs direct queue services? What is a good fit for cloud vs your own data center? This session gathers information from open source queuing projects to help answer these questions and more. Queues are part of almost every scalable website and application, it's time to find the best fit for yours.
Chemistry
Eric Day

* Run Your Javascript Everywhere, with Jellyfish.

In a world where Javascript is everywhere; your browser, server, database, mobile device -- you want and need code reuse to speed up development. In order to do this, you need to know that code works in all the environments you care about. Jellyfish is a node project focused on provisioning different environments and making it easy for you to execute your JS and get the results.
Cooking
Adam Christian

* Seven Habits Of Highly Obnoxious Trolls

Developing more effective habits isn't just for the good guys. We'll discuss seven methodologies that make trolls more effective---and tell you what you can do about it.
Culture
Bart Massey, Selena Deckelmann, Duke Leto

* Similar, But Not The Same: Designing Projects Around Three Open Datasets

The traits of an 'open' dataset -- factors like accuracy, geographic scope and copyright entanglements -- shape the development process in profound ways. I'll share what I've learned building projects around heritage trees, public art and poetry posts in Portland, and extrapolate a blueprint for evaluating and planning open data projects.
Cooking
Matt Blair

* Snooze, the Totally RESTful Language

As you can see we get a "403 Forbidden" in response to our "POST /integer/5/increment"...can anyone tell me why? It worked when we did "PUT /variable/x/let/integer/5" followed by "POST /variable/x/increment", so why can't we do it directly?
Hacks
Markus Roberts

* Technical Debt

Technical debt is something that most project teams or independent developers have to deal with - we take shortcuts to push out releases, deadlines need to be met, quick fixes slowly become the standard. In this talk, we will discuss what technical debt is, when it is acceptable and when it isn't, and strategies for effectively managing it, both on an independent and team level.
Cooking
Elizabeth Naramore

* Testing Antipatterns

Tests are great - except when they aren't. Learn how to avoid writing tests that are more trouble than they're worth.
Cooking
Matt Robinson

* The Current State of OAuth 2

If you've ever written any code to authenticate wtih Twitter, you may have been confused by all the signature methods and base strings. You'll be happy to know that OAuth 2 has vastly simplified the process, but at what cost?
Chemistry
Aaron Parecki

* The History of Concurrency

With node.js brining callbacks back into fashion and new languages like Go baking concurrency primitives directly into the language syntax, it can be difficult to keep straight what different concurrency approaches offer, what their shortcomings are, and what inspired them.
Chemistry
Michael Schurter

* User, User, Who Art Thou?

What's going on in the mind of the user as they use your system? Did they choose it, or was it chosen for them? Do they like it or hate it? How can you tell? This talk discusses the types of users that exist, and their motivations.
Cooking
Jacinta Richardson

* Write better Javascript with RequireJS

Web frameworks have done a good job of organizing the server side code in our web applications. But that doesn't help with Javascript. RequireJS helps you solve this problem.
Cooking
Chris Pitzer

Open Source Bridge 2010

Favorite sessions for this user

* A day in the life of Facebook Operations

A look at the tools and practices used at Facebook to support the #2 site in the world.
Cooking
Tom Cook

* Activity Streams, Socialism, and the Future of Open Source

It may seem obvious to some, but the socialist imagery that Mozilla uses isn't accidental. Nor is the grounding of Activity Streams in socialist theory. What do these things have to do with open source an its future? A lot, and I'll paint a picture to tell you how it should play out.
Chemistry
Chris Messina

* Agile User Experience Design

Agile processes can be very successful for both clients and developers, but the rapid pace and the lack of detailed long-term plans can make it difficult to design and build high quality user experiences. We'll talk about good ways to do that.
Cooking
Randall Hansen

* Cassandra: Strategies for Distributed Data Storage

Cassandra is an open source, highly scalable distributed database that brings together Dynamo's fully distributed design and Bigtable's ColumnFamily-based data model. In this talk we'll discuss the strategies Cassandra employs to provide an eventually consistent data model.
Chemistry
Kelvin Kakugawa

* Considering in-house automated web testing?

Interested in setting up your own test automation infrastructure? This is what you need to know.
Chemistry
Adam Christian

* CouchApp Evently Guided Hack with CouchDB

Learn to hack Evently jQuery CouchApps -- p2p web applications that can be deployed anywhere there's a CouchDB.
Hacks
J Chris Anderson

* Drizzle, Scaling MySQL for the Future

Current state of Drizzle.
Hacks
Brian Aker

* eBooks, ePub, iPad, Kindle, o-my

Print is dead. Well, not dead yet. But it'll be stone dead in a moment.
Chemistry
Lennon Day-Reynolds

* Efficient Multi-core Application Architectures

This session examines common application architectures in regards to threading and I/O handling. Various threading models are described and weighed, explaining the pros and cons of each. For I/O, topics such as the the c10k problem and buffering are discussed with solutions. A C++ framework is introduced as an example, but the concepts are applicable to other languages as well.
Chemistry
Eric Day

* Functional Requirements: Thinking Like A Pirate

Creating functional requirements as a part of the planning process is like creating a treasure map. You want to get compensated for the value your cool built-with-open-source-thing is providing to your clients. Your clients want it to work better than what they originally had in mind. If you do the work upfront, you'll know when you've hit the X marks the spot.
Business
Amye Scavarda, Bill Fitzgerald

* Give a Great Tech Talk

Why do so many technical presentations suck? Make sure that yours doesn't. Josh Berkus and Ian Dees will show you how to share your ideas with your audience by speaking effectively and (when the situation warrants it) showing your code.
Culture
Josh Berkus, Ian Dees

* Hair and Yak Again -- A Hacker's Tale

API design, parallelism, automated testing, parallel automated testing, deployment, build tools, meta programming, GUI design and construction, hardware interfaces, network protocols, databases, change tracking, file formats, and why simple software becomes an epic journey.
Chemistry
Eric Wilhelm

* How To Report A Bug

Bug reports drive Open Source, but too often it's a hostile experience. As a user, how do you report a bug without being treated like you're dumping a sack of crap on the developer's doorstep? As a developer, how do you encourage users to report bugs? This is not a tutorial, but an examination of the social aspects of bug reporting.
Cooking
Michael Schwern

* How to write quality software using the magic of tests

Writing quality software is a worthwhile challenge. Learn how to harness the magic of testing to create better software. This presentation will provide you with an overview of the different kinds of tests, show code using different testing tools, and help you decide when and how to apply these to your projects
Cooking
Igal Koshevoy

* HyperCard 2010: Why Johnny Can't Code (and What We Can Do About It)

Thomas Jefferson envisioned a nation of self-sufficient citizen farmers; programmers like Alan Kay and Bill Atkinson tried to help us code as easily as we might hang a poster on the wall. What happened to the HyperCard ideal? Have we settled for consumption over creation? I will explore the question through a case study, surveying the state of citizen programming in 2010 — from CouchApps to Shoes to plain-jane HTML5+JS to HyperCard 2.4 — and try to convince all comers that realizing the dream of the citizen coder is vital to continuing the ideals of open source.
Culture
Devin Chalmers

* iizip: Hacking together your own Dropbox

Dropbox, the leader in online storage and synchronization, is good, but not good enough. Find out how you can hack together your own equivalent that's more flexible, secure and convenient.
Hacks
Ben Dechrau

* Infrastructure as Code

Learn how to manage your infrastructure as source code - from provisioning to application deployment and everything in between.
Cooking
Adam Jacob

* Introduction to MongoDB

MongoDB is an open source, high-performance, schema-free, document-oriented database that is rapidly gaining in popularity among web developers. In this talk we'll introduce MongoDB and the features that make it great choice for your web applications.
Cooking
Michael Dirolf

* Introduction to PostgreSQL

Interested in using PostgreSQL for you next project, or migrating to it? This tutorial will go over the basics of PostgreSQL administration and database application design.
Cooking
Josh Berkus, Christophe Pettus

* JIT-Compiling Domain Specific Languages

During this talk, we will survey real-world implementations of JIT-compiled embedded DSLs and their applications.
Hacks
Jeremy Voorhis

* libcloud: a unified interface into the cloud

What is possible when you can consume servers on various hosting providers with nothing more than a python script? This talk will discuss libcloud, an Apache Incubator project dedicated to building standard interfaces into the cloud.
Cooking
Alex Polvi

* Living Together In An Open Cloud World

With millions of users signing on daily to access their favorite social media services – be it Twitter, Facebook or Digg – a developer’s worst fear is not having the backend support to house and provide access to such huge amounts of related data. Industry efforts to architect next generation databases that can scale massively by pairing open source databases and content management technologies with cloud-computing are underway. The door is also “opening” to a whole new world of user benefits which will be made possible by access to data -- cross-cloud -- in non-proprietary databases and content management systems.
Chemistry
Jonathan Bryce

* Node.js and you

Node.js is one of the most exciting things to happen to server-side development in the last few years. Here you'll find out why Node.js is a perfect fit for your next project and a better fit than existing languages for modern web development.
Cooking
Mikeal Rogers

* OAuth: an Open Specification for Web Services

Curious about OAuth? Ever wondered why OAuth has steadily gained popularity among major API providers such as Google and Twitter? Ever wondered how OAuth helps streamline consuming data from other providers? Learn more about OAuth the specification and how to implement OAuth with PHP5. The session will cover the basics of OAuth, and follow up with an OAuth implementation using php.net/oauth.
Hacks
John Jawed

* Organizing user groups, a panel discussion

User groups are a vital part of the open source community. Learn more about how to start a group, keep it going, and make an existing group better from a panel of experienced user group organizers.
Culture
Igal Koshevoy, Jesse Hallett, Eric Wilhelm, Christie Koehler, gabrielle roth, Audrey Eschright, Sam Keen

* Professional JavaScript

JavaScript is a unique and powerful language. Its ubiquity in the browser and its elegant concurrency model make JavaScript an ideal tool in a number of situations. Learn about the best ways to use and to understand this language from a full-time JavaScript professional.
Chemistry
Jesse Hallett

* Relational vs. Non-Relational

What kind of database do you need? Thanks to new database projects like CouchDB, TokyoCabinet, Solr and others, there are more non-relational database options available than ever for developers. Yet good information on how to choose what kind of database you need is still scarce. We'll cure that in this talk.
Cooking
Josh Berkus

* SELECT * FROM Internet Using YQL

Treating the internet and all its sources as a database, YQL seeks to allow developers to explore government, social, api and all other external data in a standardized way. Further allowing developers to manipulate this data and mash different sources together, YQL works to open up the web and all its sources.
Chemistry
Jonathan LeBlanc

* Sphinx - the ultimate tool for documenting your software project

Open source software projects can succeed or fail based on their documentation. Thanks to Sphinx, open source developers now have a "documentation framework" that provides convenient indexing and automatic syntax highlighting, integrates your documentation with your code, and can automatically generate a beautiful manual as a PDF document.
Cooking
Nate Aune

* Stacks of Cache

This talk focuses on adapting and augmenting interfaces to memcache in order to overcome some of its limitations and to better utilize available resources. Then we'll talk about combining those interfaces in a simple, snap-together fashion.
Cooking
Duncan Beevers

* The Open Geo Stack

Location and mapping are making a huge impact on the web and mobile. Open Source is right there. Learn the elements of the geo stack, from mapping APIs to geo databases.
Cooking
Adam DuVander

* The Return of Command-Line Kung Fu

A follow-on to last year's highly popular presentation, Hal Pomeranz returns with another super-size helping of command-line madness!
Cooking
Hal Pomeranz

* Unlikely tools for pair programming

Co-conspirators Jamey Sharp and Josh Triplett get up to a lot of miscellaneous hacking mischief together. Much of this hacking occurs while staring at the same screen, and tag-teaming the keyboard. Sometimes this happens with the two of them in different places. We'll demo our favorite tools and invite audience contributions to the discussion.
Cooking
Jamey Sharp, Josh Triplett

* Using Modern Perl

Since 2001, Perl 5 has undergone a renaissance. Modern Perl programs are powerful, maintainable, and understandable. Come learn how to take advantage of perl circa 2010.
Cooking
Chromatic X

* Your Internets are Leaking

Using your computer on a public network is like having a conversation on a city bus: people you don't know can hear everything you say. They'll probably be polite and ignore you, but you still might not want to shout out your credit card number. Yet this is what your computer does. All the time. And you don't know it.
Cooking
Reid Beels, Michael Schwern

Favorite proposals for this user

* Awesome things you've missed in Perl

Awesome things have been happening in Perl recently; so many that even if you've been paying close attention, you may have missed a few. In this talk we'll examine some of the coolest recent technologies for Perl programmers.
Cooking 2010-03-26 02:18:27 +0000
Paul Fenwick

* Behaviour Driven Infrastructure

Does Behaviour Driven Development have a role in the infrastructure world? Enter Behaviour Driven Infrastructure where systems administrators can apply BDD principles to make infrastructure management more powerful, more insightful and deliver more value to their customers.
Cooking 2010-03-25 23:22:35 +0000
James Turnbull

* Code Happier With The Cycle: Code, Test, Fail, Diff, Fix, Pass, Commit, Repeat

If I could convince developers of one thing it would be this: Writing tests and using version control together during development is the simplest way to improve your life. So I will.
Cooking 2010-03-26 01:12:49 +0000
Michael Schwern

* Constructing Effective Arguments

Ever find yourself having difficulty convincing others on the mailing list that your idea is the "right way" to do things? How about convincing your manager that it really is a great idea to run Open Source software? Need to get that patch accepted upstream? Come learn how to construct an effective argument, and increase your powers of persuasion.
Cooking 2010-03-30 06:04:11 +0000
Jennifer Redman

* Data Normalization, Denormalization, and the Forces of Darkness

Battling the minions of evil is not an appropriate time for cowboy database design. Your users' lives, and perhaps those of the entire world, depend on accurate and up-to-date data. You can't take a chance on duplicated data becoming inconsistent. You need a solid data model with little or no maintenance. At the same time, a zombie apocalypse is hardly the right situation to prioritize the purity of the data model over usability. Your users need answers fast, and their brains may already be appetizers by the time a dozen joins complete. How do we prioritize both maintainability and performance? A good DB admin knows whether normalization is the right approach for a particular data set, how far to normalize, and when and how to denormalize to improve performance. Let's hope the warriors of the forces of light have a good DB admin. If they call on you, are _you_ up to the challenge?
Cooking 2010-03-29 18:24:35 +0000
Melissa Hollingsworth

* Debt-Free: Technical Debt In Open Source Projects

Ship or fix? This choice presents itself to open source projects every day, and the consequences can be considerable. Learn how to control this "technical debt" in open source projects.
Cooking 2010-03-15 14:30:18 +0000
Brandon Savage

* Everything you ever wanted to know about Amazon EC2

Amazon Web Services makes it possible to build scalable systems easily with very little upfront capital. Come to this session to learn about what's so cool about cloud computing, and how Amazon's suite of elastic cloud computing tools make your job easier.
Cooking 2010-03-26 03:39:34 +0000
Nate Aune

* Git (Mostly) For Drupal

A crash course in git with a slant towards the special techniques needed by Drupal projects. Other developers will also find it useful.
Cooking 2010-03-26 01:31:46 +0000
Michael Schwern

* Haiku: The Other FLOSS OS

Looking for an alternative to Linux or the BSDs? Let me introduce you to Haiku, an open source clone of BeOS. We'll go through how to use it and how to contribute.
Chemistry 2010-03-25 00:09:28 +0000
John Melesky

* Javascript, the One True Language

JavaScript has long been considered a toy language, but new project focusing on server-side JavaScript the language could be the best choice for new development.
Cooking 2010-02-24 19:02:14 +0000
Stephen Woods

* Joy of Index

Every SQL database needs indexes, but which indexes? Learn how to index, when to index, why to index, and how to feel after you've indexed.
Chemistry 2010-03-10 02:52:04 +0000
Josh Berkus

* Making software management tools work for you

With the advent of such rich open source tools such as Subversion, Git, Trac, CruiseControl, and Review Board, managing software projects of any size has become much easier than ever. But how do you best use these tools in your organization? In this talk we'll look at how these tools can fit into any software project, helping you make your team more efficient than before.
Cooking 2010-03-15 02:09:55 +0000
John Mertic

* perl5i: Perl 5 Improved

perl5i is a single module bringing together the best magic Perl programmers have to offer catapulting the basic language forward. Suddenly everything is an object! Functions return objects and throw exceptions! You don't have to load six modules to work with files! Perl 5 is fun again!
Hacks 2010-03-26 00:52:24 +0000
Michael Schwern

* Preparing for the big launch

Preparing for the big launch
Business 2010-03-26 21:32:49 +0000
Robby Russell

* Server optimization for high traffic web systems using multiple retry and learning timeout patterns

A webpage typically will be as slow as the slowest request in the page. So if for a high traffic website like Yahoo! frontpage has lots of such possibly slow external apis, it could hold webserver processes and also effect user experience. Multiple Retry is a feature meant to optimize server resource utilization and efficiently use webserver processes/threads.
Chemistry 2010-03-26 18:24:10 +0000
Jayadev Chandrasekhar

* The new schism: SQL vs. NoSQL

RDMS showed us the one true way to organize data, yet the NoSQL movement shows us how it fails. The faithful are confused and concerned. The heretics rally boldly in the streets with torches and pitchforks, yelling something about "doesn't scale," while the defenders of orthodoxy scream about the features and safeties these strange new gods lack, and do the apostates even realize it? As the philosophical storm brews, DB admins and developers must make fateful decisions that will affect the rest of the code's life. Here they will glean the first glimpses of the knowledge they will need to make informed choices and be spared the wrath of the database gods.
Chemistry 2010-03-29 23:17:58 +0000
Melissa Hollingsworth

* WebNumbr - Graph anything on the web

Graphs are awesome. Everyone can find graphs for stocks and gas prices, and maybe even Amazon prices if you're good. But how about your twitter list counts, P1 bug reports, server connection count, or flickr pictures per millisecond? Come see a cool tool that will revolutionize your graphing life.
Hacks 2010-02-24 21:02:56 +0000
Paul Tarjan

Open Source Bridge 2009 Birds of a Feather

Favorite sessions for this user

* Code-n-Splode BOF

BOF to go with the "My Grand Experiment" Talk. http://opensourcebridge.org/sessions/115
BoF
gabrielle roth

* PDXCritique

PDXCritique is an open forum where anyone who makes things can get constructive criticism on their work from their peers.
BoF
ben hengst

Open Source Bridge 2009

Favorite sessions for this user

* "M" is for Manual: Creating Documentation for your Project

Documentation for open source projects is every bit as important as the code itself. But how can you create a single source of docs that can be used in a variety of ways and translated into other languages? This presentation will show you how.
Cooking
Paul Frields

* 5 things to know about MySQL if you don't have a DBA

quick and dirty operational best practices that should be baked into your development and deployment plans.
Cooking
sarah novotny

* Advanced Git tutorial: Not your average VCS.

Do you know the basics of Git but wonder what all the hype is about? Do you want the ultimate control over your Git history? This tutorial will walk you through the basics of committing changes before diving into the more advanced and "dangerous" Git commands.
Cooking
Sarah Sharp

* Become a better programmer by bridging Ousterhout's Dichotomy

Do you know a dynamic/scripting language like Ruby or Python, but you don't know C? Diving down just a little can make you a better programmer in your preferred language! Scripting languages can teach old C hands a thing or two, too. Delve into the benefits of being a multilingual programmer.
Cooking
Andy Grover

* Building a SQL Database That Works

As a developer, what you really need are some simple recipes for how to think about designing your SQL databases so that they are simple, maintainable, expandable and easy to troubleshoot.
Cooking
Josh Berkus

* Building Open-Source Desktop Apps with the Titanium Platform

The open-source Titanium platform allows developers to use their existing knowledge of rich web application technologies – JavaScript, Python, Ruby, HTML and CSS – to build desktop applications. In this presentation we'll go from start to finish building a desktop application using Titanium.
Cooking
Marshall Culpepper, Martin Robinson

* Command-Line Kung Fu: White Belt

Come and learn some useful command-line short cuts and shell idioms that will make you vastly more productive in a Linux or Unix shell. Time permitting, we'll even play "stump the expert", so bring your thorniest shell problems.
Cooking
Hal Pomeranz

* Deploying to the Edge from CouchDB

CouchDB can serve standalone applications, which can be shared amongst users, putting the source code (and control) back in their hands.
Hacks
J Chris Anderson

* Drizzle, Rethinking MySQL for the Web

Rethinking MySQL for the modern web.
Chemistry
Brian Aker

* Effective code sprinting

Code sprints are events where developers quickly complete coding tasks in a collaborative environment. A panel of skilled developers will share their experiences for organizing effective code sprints so you can better participate and organize your own. The panel members have organized and participated in over a hundred sprints (ranging from Django to JRuby) and used sprints as the primary way to develop community-oriented projects (e.g., Calagator). While most of the discussion will be about volunteer-run open source code sprints, many of the ideas will be readily applicable to improving development at your workplace. The panel will offer practical, actionable advice that you can use and answer your questions.
Culture
Igal Koshevoy, Reid Beels, Audrey Eschright

* Friday Unconference Kickoff & Scheduling

Welcome to the unconference day.
Culture
Audrey Eschright, Selena Deckelmann, Chris Messina

* Introduction to Lift

Build real-time interactive applications using the Lift Web Framework
Cooking
David Pollak

* Introduction to Parrot

This talk briefly explains the overall architecture of Parrot and teaches the skills needed to get started hacking in Parrot.
Hacks
Chromatic X

* Layers of Caching: Key to scaling your website

Caching is essential to ensuring that your website will survive a large spike in traffic. With so many different forms of caching, how are you supposed to know what works and why you should use it? The key is layering your site with several forms of caching.
Chemistry
Lance Albertson, Narayan Newton

* Making Twitter Suck Less With Perl

Spam is starting to infiltrate Twitter and other similar online communities. Learn how to use Perl to filter to garbage from the gold and search for what matters to you.
Hacks
Jonathan Leto

* My Grand Experiment: A Portland Women-focused Tech Group.

The idea for Code-n-Splode grew out of the Women in Open Source BOF at OSCON 2007. I'll talk about my original reasons for starting a women-friendly tech group, how the group is evolving, and what I've learned.
Culture
gabrielle roth

* Open Source Microblogging with Laconica

Microblogging lets people share short status messages with their social network. Public Web sites like Twitter, Jaiku and Plurk are wildly popular with consumers, but Open Source programs allow a distributed social graph and implementation inside the enterprise firewall. Evan Prodromou, founder of Identi.ca, will describe the Open Source microblogging tool Laconica and its uses in the workplace and on the Public Web.
Chemistry
Evan Prodromou

* Open Source Tools for Freelancers

As a freelancer, you must be your own IT department. You are responsible for website hosting, backups, version control, project/time-tracking and invoicing. Finding inexpensive and maintainable solutions for these needs can be quite daunting. In this session, I will present an overview open-source solutions for these needs.
Business
Christie Koehler

* Please Your Pixel-Hungry Eyes With Codes That Read Better

Make the text you see in the Terminal window more legible and readable by finding, customizing and designing your own font!
Hacks
Bram Pitoyo

* Project Management Should be Boring!

Many people see project management as the art of trying to please everyone and pleasing no one, while trying not to go too far over deadline and too far over budget. It doesn't have to be that way. Good project management can be so predictable and reliable that it's almost boring. Here's what works in real projects.
Cooking
Chromatic X

* Thursday Keynotes

Featuring Mayor Sam Adams and Ward Cunningham
Culture
Audrey Eschright, Selena Deckelmann, Ward Cunningham

* Unit Test Your Database!

Given that the database, as the canonical repository of data, is the most important part of many applications, why is it that we don't write database unit tests? This talk promotes the practice of implementing tests to directly test the schema, storage, and functionality of databases.
Cooking
David Wheeler

* Using virtualization and automation to improve your web development workflow

Large-scale web projects use sophisticated staged deployment systems, but the prospect of setting these up can be daunting. Using virtualization and automated configuration puts the benefits within easy reach even for small projects. David Brewer explains how Second Story uses Linux, VMware Server, and AutomateIt to grease the wheels of development on their museum-sector projects.
Cooking
David Brewer

* Web Server Shootout

Deploying your .com behind nginx so you're ready to handle that flood of users on launch day? Wondering if you should use mod_python, mod_wsgi, or FastCGI to deploy your new Django project? This presentation will present comprehensive and practical benchmarks across a wide variety of metrics to help you make an informed decision.
Chemistry
Michael Schurter

* Web Testing with Windmill

This talk will discuss different web testing strategies, tools, and getting you up and writing windmill tests.
Cooking
Mikeal Rogers

* Wednesday Welcome and Keynotes

Featuring Amber Case, Cyborg Anthropologist, and Kurt von Finck of Monty Program AB.
Culture
Audrey Eschright, Selena Deckelmann, Amber Case, Kurt von Finck

* Write your own Bayesian Classifier: An Introduction to Machine Learning

Can you perform simple arithmetic? Do you know how to program well enough to open and read files? Then you can write a Bayesian classifier, one of the machine learning techniques for predicting categories, most famous for its use in spam filters. Let's demystify this impressively-named but ultimately simple process.
Cooking
John Melesky