Michael Schoonmaker's favorites

Favorite sessions for this user

* Building #Resist at Meetup: Actual Corporate Activism in the Age of Trump

Learn how Meetup made the decision to create #Resist, a free network of over 1000 Meetups worldwide that anyone could organize with or join, and the questions we had to ask about how a private company could help self-empower the public in an actual way.
Activism
Yanyi .

* Effective Presentations Using Applied Logical Fallacies

For many novice speakers, especially technical speakers, the hardest part of presenting is not figuring out what to put in but what to leave out. But what works for an academic paper doesn't work in a 10 minute presentation, and you risk boring your audience long before you manage to convince them of anything. This talk is intended to be a fun (and perhaps a bit silly) look at the science and the art of being convincing. I will cover how logical fallacies are used in propaganda, lying, and how you can use them to get your point across quickly. And don't worry, we'll also talk about how to do this ethically!
Practice
Terri Oda

* Futel: The Network We Deserve

Futel has provided free public telephone service, telephone-mediated art, and live human interaction for several years, and was recognized as Portland's most prolific payphone installer of 2016. Now that we are finally living in the cyberpunk dystopia promised in the 80s, we are poised to seize this moment.
Activism
Karl Anderson

* Geek Choir

In this session, we explore ways to improve team cohesion, cooperation, connection, and presence for each other via song.
Culture
Michael Alan Brewer

* JavaScriptural Exegesis

If we're going to be so religious about our standards and patterns, why not use religious tools to analyze and improve them? Exegesis is a tool for nuance and understanding in the absolutes found on bikesheds everywhere, such as "replace all vars with const" and "arrow functions will save your eternal soul".
Theory
Michael Schoonmaker

* Morning Keynote — Doing away with (bad) shibboleths

The developer community has many ways of determining who belongs and who doesn’t. Some of these are helpful, but others intimidate beginners who could go on to be good developers. This talk will provide a framework for differentiation between the good and the bad.
Activism
Walé Ogundipé

* Morning Keynote — Fake Science! Sad! A case study of the perils of Open Data

Open source allows anyone to use their skills to change the world--for better or for worse. In an era where the phrase "Fake News!" echoes from the highest office of the land, we have to cast a critical eye on the works that we promote and participate in. Open Data is no exception, and the use of Open Data to generate Fake Analyses is a real issue that can undermine social progress.
Activism
Emily Gorcenski

* Outside Looking In: Working to Reshape the Cultural Memory of Tech

This presentation talks about how the culture of technology is built around the cultural influence of those who've come first to the table. We'll look into how these narratives are made, what we can do about it, and the best ways these narratives can be challenged to make tech more open and accommodating to those on the outside.
Culture
Josh Lim

* The Set of Programmers: How Math Restricts Us

People new to programming often have to work through barriers of language and learning in order to become proficient and being contributing. Does one of those barriers need to be one's math skills? Most schools and textbooks seem to think so. Let's discuss how we're introducing new developers to programming and whether we can make it more inclusive by removing the mathematics and replacing it with logic.
Culture
Carol Smith

* Translating Ancient Texts: The Nginx Parser

Find out what it took to get Certbot's Nginx parser working, which is an... exciting... tale at the intersection of programming language theory, regular expressions, formal grammars, and the utter lack of these in a fine, aged codebase.
Practice
Erica Portnoy