David Brewer's favorites

Open Source Bridge 2012

Favorite sessions for this user

* <Your Favorite Programming Language> Loses

Every programming language ever created has some horrible mistakes: your favorite is no exception. We'll talk about some fundamental principles of PL design and how they fail to play out in various real languages.
Chemistry
Bart Massey

* An Introduction to Luvit

Luvit is a new open source asynchronous framework. We will dive into what this project does, how it works, and what the goals are for the future.
Chemistry
Brandon Philips

* An Open Source Hardware Sensor Network for the Rest of Us

The physical world contains huge amounts of data that are underutilized by most people. The vision is to build a sensor network platform that can act as a hardware extension to a person’s identity — importing data about their environment, activities, energy/resource usage, and others into a personal data locker.
Chemistry
Eric Jennings

* Building and Testing REST APIs in Node.js

Learn about techniques, libraries and patterns useful for building REST APIs using Node.js
Cooking
Russell Haering

* Building Web Apps with Clojure

Get ready for a whirlwind tour of the current Clojure ecosystem of web app technologies. This talk will demonstrate how fast, responsive apps can be built on this up-and-coming functional language, which is based on Lisp and runs on the JVM.
Cooking
Scott Becker

* Dark Arts of Data Storage: What's Your Filesystem up to?

Ever wonder what happens to your data between the write() call and the disk drive? Or feel the need to scrape your bits off the drive after an accident? If so, this talk is for you! Come learn the dark art of how filesystems work.
Chemistry
Darrick Wong

* Dread Free Continuous Deployment Using Dreadnot

Learn how to use Dreadnot, an open source deployment orchestration tool creating using Node.js and Twitter Bootstrap, to integrate with a variety of integration and infrastructure tools to enable rolling deployments with the click of a button.
Cooking
Russell Haering

* Go Go Gallimaufry

At one point it was popular to refer to the eyes as windows to the soul, and common wisdom accepted that you could learn a great deal about a person's inner thoughts by looking at their eyes. Then that notion fell out of fashion, except perhaps in love songs. But once we learned how to track people's eye motions, record them, and analyse the data, we realized that there may have been something to it.
Chemistry
Markus Roberts

* How and When to Do It Wrong

Constraints make good art. Everyone knows the right way to design and implement software — but is the wrong way really so bad? This talk demonstrates unconventional approaches to solving common and real problems and explores their benefits and drawbacks.
Hacks
Chromatic X

* Nginx, Overview and Deployment

As the #2 most popular web server, NGINX has gained attention because of its performance, scalability and ability to manage concurrent requests. What are the basics that every developer needs to know about NGINX? Why would you choose Nginx over some other web server? What are typical deployment scenarios?
Chemistry
Cliff Wells

* Pro-Style Code Review

Code review is awesome. Do more of it.
Business
Lennon Day-Reynolds

* Solving Interesting Problems by Writing Parsers

What do you do when you have to parse weird message formats? You write parser! Or, in this case a regular expression. See how I make a moderately challenging problem easy for everyone.
Cooking
Jacinta Richardson

* Sorry for Browser Hacking

The web was born of a series of deeply audacious hacks that created and transformed the browser into the most important, transparent, buggy and misunderstood software ever. A big part of the credit for this goes to the ability of any programmer to hack the browser itself using the technology of the web itself.
Cooking
Jeff Griffiths

* The Style of Style Guides

When you code, should you indent 2, 4 or 8 characters? Where should you put the braces? What should your variables and functions be named? Is it worth having an argument about any of this? This talk offers an analytical approach to deciding which elements of style will benefit your code. We'll discover which is the "best style" and which is the style you should use.
Chemistry
Michael Schwern

* Thriving in Chaos: An Introduction to Systems Thinking

For centuries we have learned to solve problems with a linear approach. This originated with Isaac Newton in the sevententh century and assumes that everything in the world is connected through cause and effect. Systems thinking throws away that assumption and examines the universe as small pieces connected into a complex network. You will learn how a systems thinking approach can be used to create robust groups that don't have leaders.
Culture
Alex Kroman

* What We Talk About When We Talk About Project Management

We ask for a lot of things under the heading of 'project management'. This leads to pain and suffering when we are not clear for what we are asking for, or we're not set up to support what we're asking for. This is particularly special in open source companies and projects.
Business
Amye Scavarda

* When Google Maps Gives You Lemons, Make Lemonade

Make your life sweeter by replacing Google Maps with open-source alternatives.
Cooking
Wm Leler

Favorite proposals for this user

* Stack up the Stacks: a Comparison of Modern Web Development Tools.

Comparing RoR, Node.js, Django, Lift, and Spring MVC in code.
Chemistry 2012-03-28 15:12:03 +0000
Nick Muhonen

* Data Abstraction in Large Web Applications

The principles of abstraction are drilled into us repeatedly, and we work hard to abstract the layers of our applications. Abstraction between layers is excellent, but what about abstraction within layers, especially the data layer? Many developers still build database-centric applications, and then struggle the day they need an additional or new data source. Learn the reasons why this is a poor design choice, and the best ways to avoid it.
Cooking 2012-02-15 16:30:54 +0000
Brandon Savage

* Embarrassingly Cloudable

There is a well known term "embarrassingly parallel" used to describe a class of problems that are perfectly suited for parallelization. Similarly, there are problems in modern computing that are "embarrassingly cloudable", eg. perfectly suited for cloud computing.
Cooking 2012-03-22 00:11:42 +0000
Troy Howard

* Keep control of your PHP projects!

This talk will show how to keep control of your PHP projects with continuous integration and deep source code analysis.
Business 2012-02-04 21:55:46 +0000
Hugo Hamon

* Large project migration from Subversion to Git: how hard can it be?

The trials and tribulations of taking a large project (MediaWiki), and migrating it from Subversion to Git.
Cooking 2012-03-16 01:28:06 +0000
Rob Lanphier

* Managing Nerds: 12 things you need to do as a new manager

Are you an aspiring manager, a current manager, or just wondering what the heck it is that a manager does all day? I'll go over the successes and failures I had while making the transition from the text editor to the conference room. You'll learn how to delegate effectively, set goals, coach employees, how to handle one-on-one meetings, and more.
Business 2012-03-16 23:58:08 +0000
Alex Kroman

* OpenStack 101

OpenStack is an open source project based on the efforts of over a thousand developers working to build a better cloud operating system.
Business 2012-03-16 17:19:57 +0000
Christopher MacGown

* Reading Rainbow: How to Read Code and Documentation

One of the best methods for learning new coding techniques is to read open source code. However, unlike normal books, code isn't meant to be read from top to bottom, beginning to end. Instead, code is more like a choose-your-own-adventure book, where each function can take you down a different path. I'll highlight some well documented open source projects, what makes them easy to get started for readers, and how to get started learning a new technology. For veteran developers, this talk will point out common pitfalls in documentation and how to avoid them for beginners.
Culture 2012-03-21 18:30:03 +0000
Jerry Cheung

* Tools of the PHP Trade

Writing code is one thing; however this session covers everything BUT the code, opening a box full of tools to use with your LAMP (but with a definite PHP flavour) stack. Expect a showcase of which tools are currently around, and when you'll want to use them. We'll see what they can do and how we can apply them in a practical way.
Cooking 2012-03-16 18:42:07 +0000
Lorna Mitchell

* Video editing the easy way using Kdenlive

Video editing using Open Source can be quite a headache if you are not using the proper tools with adequate functionalities. So, in this tutorial we will learn how to do video editing using Kdenlive which is a non-linear video editor.
Cooking 2012-03-09 02:09:11 +0000
Jayneil Dalal

* Which Distribution is Fastest?

We benchmarked Ubuntu, Suse and Redhat. We ran many tests of many different features. We know which system is fastest for which purpose.
Chemistry 2012-03-28 03:12:16 +0000
Randy Appleton

Open Source Bridge 2010

Favorite sessions for this user

* A day in the life of Facebook Operations

A look at the tools and practices used at Facebook to support the #2 site in the world.
Cooking
Tom Cook

* Building Interactive Displays with Touchscreen 2.0

Touchscreen is a platform for creating interactive kiosk and dashboard displays. It powers presentations for visitors to the Open Source Lab's data center and the network operations center. Come learn how touchscreen works and how to use it for your own display screens.
Cooking
Peter Krenesky, Rob McGuire-Dale

* Considering in-house automated web testing?

Interested in setting up your own test automation infrastructure? This is what you need to know.
Chemistry
Adam Christian

* Copyright lawyers can Gödel

"This compression algorithm is of course very inefficient, at least when applied to a small collection of documents. But if you were to apply it to a larger collection, say, all the music ever recorded and all movies ever made, some gains may be realized...
Hacks
Markus Roberts

* Drizzle, Scaling MySQL for the Future

Current state of Drizzle.
Hacks
Brian Aker

* Functional Requirements: Thinking Like A Pirate

Creating functional requirements as a part of the planning process is like creating a treasure map. You want to get compensated for the value your cool built-with-open-source-thing is providing to your clients. Your clients want it to work better than what they originally had in mind. If you do the work upfront, you'll know when you've hit the X marks the spot.
Business
Amye Scavarda, Bill Fitzgerald

* Hair and Yak Again -- A Hacker's Tale

API design, parallelism, automated testing, parallel automated testing, deployment, build tools, meta programming, GUI design and construction, hardware interfaces, network protocols, databases, change tracking, file formats, and why simple software becomes an epic journey.
Chemistry
Eric Wilhelm

* HipHop for PHP

HipHop transforms PHP source code into highly optimised C++ and then compiles it using g++. It allows developers to continue writing complex logical directly with PHP but leverages the speed benefits of using C++. Currently, HipHop powers the majority of Facebook servers, making this more than just a theoretical exercise. This session will cover how HipHop works, how to setup HipHop and the small changes that may be required to applications to allow it to work with both PHP and HipHop.
Chemistry
Haiping Zhao

* Introduction to MongoDB

MongoDB is an open source, high-performance, schema-free, document-oriented database that is rapidly gaining in popularity among web developers. In this talk we'll introduce MongoDB and the features that make it great choice for your web applications.
Cooking
Michael Dirolf

* Introduction to PostgreSQL

Interested in using PostgreSQL for you next project, or migrating to it? This tutorial will go over the basics of PostgreSQL administration and database application design.
Cooking
Josh Berkus, Christophe Pettus

* Making Drupal Go Fast with Varnish and Pressflow

You've launched your new web site and it's starting to get some attention. You've tuned your database and optimized your HTTP daemon, but what if it's not enough to keep up with all the hits you're getting? We'd like to introduce you to your two new best friends: Varnish and Pressflow.
Cooking
Greg Lund-Chaix, Rudy Grigar

* Node.js and you

Node.js is one of the most exciting things to happen to server-side development in the last few years. Here you'll find out why Node.js is a perfect fit for your next project and a better fit than existing languages for modern web development.
Cooking
Mikeal Rogers

* Professional JavaScript

JavaScript is a unique and powerful language. Its ubiquity in the browser and its elegant concurrency model make JavaScript an ideal tool in a number of situations. Learn about the best ways to use and to understand this language from a full-time JavaScript professional.
Chemistry
Jesse Hallett

* Relational vs. Non-Relational

What kind of database do you need? Thanks to new database projects like CouchDB, TokyoCabinet, Solr and others, there are more non-relational database options available than ever for developers. Yet good information on how to choose what kind of database you need is still scarce. We'll cure that in this talk.
Cooking
Josh Berkus

* Stacks of Cache

This talk focuses on adapting and augmenting interfaces to memcache in order to overcome some of its limitations and to better utilize available resources. Then we'll talk about combining those interfaces in a simple, snap-together fashion.
Cooking
Duncan Beevers

* The $2 computer: ultraconstrained devices do your bidding

"Do you watch television? Is your furnace loud? Do you have $2?" My 7-year-old's marketing suggestions aside, building custom gadgets to improve your life is remarkably simple, and I'll prove it by building something on stage that you can duplicate at home.
Hacks
David Hollingsworth

* The Return of Command-Line Kung Fu

A follow-on to last year's highly popular presentation, Hal Pomeranz returns with another super-size helping of command-line madness!
Cooking
Hal Pomeranz

* The symfony framework behind the scenes at museum installations

The symfony framework is a full-stack web framework for PHP. It's great for building websites, but you might be surprised where else it comes in handy. David Brewer shows how Second Story uses symfony to build custom content management and delivery systems powering interactive installations ranging from collections of Disney memorabilia to maps plotting every monument at Gettysburg.
Cooking
David Brewer

* Using Modern Perl

Since 2001, Perl 5 has undergone a renaissance. Modern Perl programs are powerful, maintainable, and understandable. Come learn how to take advantage of perl circa 2010.
Cooking
Chromatic X

* When Everything Looks Like A Nail

Markus: Nautilus? I thought you said noodle house! Matt: Wait, wait, I think I see her head!! Markus: Are you sure? Matt: Maybe It's Not Her Head...
Hacks
Markus Roberts, Matt Youell

* Why the Sysadmin Hates Your Software

You've worked really hard on your software. It's stable and has lots of nice features and users love it. But your sysadmin hates it and complains about how hard it is to install, configure, and manage. What's up with that?
Chemistry
Steve VanDevender

* You Shall Not Pass: Managing Expectations and Boundaries with Clients

Open Source is great fun, even in the area of professional services. But sometimes, you want to be able to pay the bills with your awesomeness too. One of the areas of difficulty is setting boundaries with clients, even though you really just want to write amazing stuff.
Business
Amye Scavarda, Chris Strahl

Favorite proposals for this user

* 21 Rules for Software Consulting

Do you have what it takes to succeed as a software consultant? Or will you crash and burn out in an avalanche of missed deadlines, overdue bills and litiginous former clients? Learn the 21 rules and you have a much better chance of surviving, or even succeeding.
Business 2010-03-14 05:01:40 +0000
Josh Berkus

* Automating Flex/Flash with Windmill or Selenium

Get automated tests up and running for your Flex or Flash application in minutes.
Cooking 2010-03-24 18:20:20 +0000
Adam Christian

* Awesome things you've missed in Perl

Awesome things have been happening in Perl recently; so many that even if you've been paying close attention, you may have missed a few. In this talk we'll examine some of the coolest recent technologies for Perl programmers.
Cooking 2010-03-26 02:18:27 +0000
Paul Fenwick

* Behaviour Driven Infrastructure

Does Behaviour Driven Development have a role in the infrastructure world? Enter Behaviour Driven Infrastructure where systems administrators can apply BDD principles to make infrastructure management more powerful, more insightful and deliver more value to their customers.
Cooking 2010-03-25 23:22:35 +0000
James Turnbull

* Building a platform from open source at Yahoo!

Join us for a case study on using open source tools to build a platform for enterprise web applications with symfony. The focus of this session will be on how Yahoo! has built web applications that scale with open source tools.
Chemistry 2010-02-24 22:12:54 +0000
Dustin Whittle

* Debt-Free: Technical Debt In Open Source Projects

Ship or fix? This choice presents itself to open source projects every day, and the consequences can be considerable. Learn how to control this "technical debt" in open source projects.
Cooking 2010-03-15 14:30:18 +0000
Brandon Savage

* Developing easily deployable PHP Applications

Talks about how to develop PHP applications that can be deployed on many different platforms with ease.
Chemistry 2010-03-15 02:09:08 +0000
John Mertic

* Emperor Mensuraton and the Sword of Statisticales

The rule of Emperor Mensuraton begat army upon army of data until it overran the Empire. The Sword of Statisticales was dispatched to reduce them summarily. Some were average, while others were mean, and one was a la mode. They plotted through lines, bars and pies until finally there emerged one number to rule them all.
Chemistry 2010-03-16 01:39:04 +0000
Philip Tellis

* Git (Mostly) For Drupal

A crash course in git with a slant towards the special techniques needed by Drupal projects. Other developers will also find it useful.
Cooking 2010-03-26 01:31:46 +0000
Michael Schwern

* Help! My webapp is slow and I don't know what to do!

One of your clients has asked you to have a look at their web application and to make it faster. Where do you start? Without looking at (or changing) the source code of the application, what can you do to make it better?
Cooking 2010-03-12 04:37:54 +0000
Francois Marier

* How to learn to parse huge XML documents by doing it wrong for 5 years

Tyler Riddle will cover his learning experiences creating the Parse::MediaWikiDump, XML::TreePuller, and MediaWiki::DumpFile modules which are made to handle the 24 gigabyte English Wikipedia dump files in a reasonable time frame.
Hacks 2010-03-22 16:31:19 +0000
Tyler Riddle

* Javascript, the One True Language

JavaScript has long been considered a toy language, but new project focusing on server-side JavaScript the language could be the best choice for new development.
Cooking 2010-02-24 19:02:14 +0000
Stephen Woods

* Joy of Index

Every SQL database needs indexes, but which indexes? Learn how to index, when to index, why to index, and how to feel after you've indexed.
Chemistry 2010-03-10 02:52:04 +0000
Josh Berkus

* Lift tips and tricks

See @harryh's 5 line lazy-loading snippet, all the code you need to guard against replay attacks/XSRF, and building real-time web apps in Lift
Cooking 2010-03-15 20:49:08 +0000
David Pollak

* Making software management tools work for you

With the advent of such rich open source tools such as Subversion, Git, Trac, CruiseControl, and Review Board, managing software projects of any size has become much easier than ever. But how do you best use these tools in your organization? In this talk we'll look at how these tools can fit into any software project, helping you make your team more efficient than before.
Cooking 2010-03-15 02:09:55 +0000
John Mertic

* PHP for professional folks

Join this session if you are interested in learning about the latest and greatest tools and techniques available to the PHP community.
Cooking 2010-02-24 22:21:13 +0000
Dustin Whittle

* Put Down the Superglobals! Secure PHP Development with Inspekt

Inspekt is a filtering and validation library for PHP. With a focus on ease of use, Inspekt makes writing secure PHP applications faster and easier. This talk covers the Inspekt library and the "input cage" concept, best practices when utilizing the library, and how to integrate Inspekt with existing applications and popular frameworks.
Cooking 2010-02-21 03:16:33 +0000
Edward Finkler

* REPENT!!! FOR THE END OF THE UNIX EPOCH IS NIGH!!!

SINNERS!! HEAR ME!! For too long have you lain contented and SLOTHFUL in the illusion that time is infinite! SOON the UNIX EPOCH will END and numbers will OVERFLOW their confines CLEANSING all in a flood the likes we have not seen since 1901!!! The SINS of your 32 BITS will chase your children and your children's children unless you REPENT NOW and cleanse your code of the 2038 BUG!!
Chemistry 2010-03-26 00:33:39 +0000
Michael Schwern

* Slideware

When you're giving a technical talk, you're the star---but the code you're presenting is your most important prop. We're going to discuss ways to show your code to an audience. You'll come away with tips that will save you time and help you communicate your ideas clearly.
Cooking 2010-03-10 20:44:58 +0000
Ian Dees

* Test Driven Database Development

Learn how to apply the principals of test-driven development to developing a database schema.
Cooking 2010-03-21 01:02:05 +0000
David Wheeler

* Understanding and building scalable software paradigms

The road lay ahead, success or failure, and how you respond early will help determine your outcome. With much planning, thought, and expense you've built the greatest tribute to innovation, Solving a problem, filling a need or answering the call of excellence. All worthy pursuits in the attempt to obtain your goals and roll out your product or solution. Success!! People are using it. One problem, people are using it.
Cooking 2010-03-18 06:25:10 +0000
Dan Wade

* Using Django on the Djob

Django is a great framework for building public web sites, but it's also a great platform for building connected business apps. This session will examine use cases where Django presents an opportunity to build powerful, robust systems on a budget.
Cooking 2010-03-16 23:23:23 +0000
Dylan Reinhardt

* Web Framework Shootout

Which web framework will rule them all? As an audience member you pick the winner! We will present an introduction to a variety of web frameworks including Rails, Django, Symfony, and Sinatra.
Cooking 2010-02-25 23:15:13 +0000
Dustin Whittle

* Why Open Source? Reasons Open Source Is Right For Your Customers

Convincing a potential client that open source solutions are best can be tricky. A successful proposal must effortlessly make this point well to be successful.
Business 2010-03-15 14:32:22 +0000
Brandon Savage

Open Source Bridge 2009

Favorite sessions for this user

* 5 things to know about MySQL if you don't have a DBA

quick and dirty operational best practices that should be baked into your development and deployment plans.
Cooking
sarah novotny

* An Introduction to Computer Vision

Learn about several computer vision techniques and how to put them together to form an entry-level object classifier.
Chemistry
Matthew Dockrey

* Ask Forgiveness not Permission

In this session we will explore many of the ways to innovate without the need for a significant budget by using open source software to try new things under the radar and on a shoestring budget.
Cooking
Emma McGrattan

* Become a better programmer by bridging Ousterhout's Dichotomy

Do you know a dynamic/scripting language like Ruby or Python, but you don't know C? Diving down just a little can make you a better programmer in your preferred language! Scripting languages can teach old C hands a thing or two, too. Delve into the benefits of being a multilingual programmer.
Cooking
Andy Grover

* Bridging the Developer and the Datacenter

This discussion will creatively explore the fundamental technologies being used by hosting providers, and bridge these concepts with open source development and application deployment. Developers attending this discussion will be provided with examples of where failure can occur, and what questions to ask their provider to ensure optimal uptime for their applications.
Business
Thomas Brenneke

* Building a SQL Database That Works

As a developer, what you really need are some simple recipes for how to think about designing your SQL databases so that they are simple, maintainable, expandable and easy to troubleshoot.
Cooking
Josh Berkus

* Building Open-Source Desktop Apps with the Titanium Platform

The open-source Titanium platform allows developers to use their existing knowledge of rich web application technologies – JavaScript, Python, Ruby, HTML and CSS – to build desktop applications. In this presentation we'll go from start to finish building a desktop application using Titanium.
Cooking
Marshall Culpepper, Martin Robinson

* bzr vs git smack down

Selena loves Git and EmmaJane loves Bazaar. And like all good nerds they've spent a fair amount of time talkin' smack about the other's version control system (VCS). Come see what the fuss is all about!
Cooking
EmmaJane Hogbin, Selena Deckelmann

* CodeIgniter As Drinking Game

DRINK.
Cooking
Jeffrey McManus

* Command-Line Kung Fu: White Belt

Come and learn some useful command-line short cuts and shell idioms that will make you vastly more productive in a Linux or Unix shell. Time permitting, we'll even play "stump the expert", so bring your thorniest shell problems.
Cooking
Hal Pomeranz

* Configuration Management Panel

Configuration management tools are finally coming into their own. Powerful, automated infrastructure management is now available in a wide variety of open source tools. Tools written in different languages, using varying operational methodologies and embracing differing philosophies. Come meet some of the creators and maintainers of these cutting edge tools like cfengine, Puppet, AutomateIT, Chef, and bcfg2 and quiz them in the why and hows of their tools and the philosophies behind them.
Cooking
James Turnbull, Igal Koshevoy, Luke Kanies, Narayan Desai, Adam Jacob, Brendan Strejcek

* Deploying to the Edge from CouchDB

CouchDB can serve standalone applications, which can be shared amongst users, putting the source code (and control) back in their hands.
Hacks
J Chris Anderson

* Django: Thinking Outside The Blog

Django is a powerful web development framework that is incredibly well-documented. Many tutorials exist for doing simple things quickly in Django... but what do you do after that?
Cooking
Dylan Reinhardt

* Domo Arigato Mr. Roboto

This session is for developers who want to learn about the Android platform. Android is a software stack for mobile devices that includes an operating system, middleware and key applications. We’ll discuss the Android toolset and platform API’s.
Chemistry
Sean Sullivan

* Drop ACID and think about data

Survey of current database technologies beyond the traditional ACID RDBMS
Chemistry
Bob Ippolito

* Effective code sprinting

Code sprints are events where developers quickly complete coding tasks in a collaborative environment. A panel of skilled developers will share their experiences for organizing effective code sprints so you can better participate and organize your own. The panel members have organized and participated in over a hundred sprints (ranging from Django to JRuby) and used sprints as the primary way to develop community-oriented projects (e.g., Calagator). While most of the discussion will be about volunteer-run open source code sprints, many of the ideas will be readily applicable to improving development at your workplace. The panel will offer practical, actionable advice that you can use and answer your questions.
Culture
Igal Koshevoy, Reid Beels, Audrey Eschright

* Is the Web Down: a Practical Tutorial on How the Web Works

You click on a link and you can't get to your favorite web site. Now what? Is the web site down? Is it your connection? Is it something in between? How can you figure out what's wrong if you don't know how it works? We'll show you everything that happens after you click a link so next time the web site is down you'll know what to do to fix it.
Chemistry
Michael Schwern, Joshua Keroes

* Layers of Caching: Key to scaling your website

Caching is essential to ensuring that your website will survive a large spike in traffic. With so many different forms of caching, how are you supposed to know what works and why you should use it? The key is layering your site with several forms of caching.
Chemistry
Lance Albertson, Narayan Newton

* New Ways for Teaching Children Software Programming

Software programming has come a long way for students and younger children since the days of Logo. Syntax has been replaced with connecting blocks and the triangle turtle has been replaced with custom artwork children create themselves. Now, multi-threading and event processing are easier to teach children than functions, and this session discusses these ideas as well as so the edge of kid code.
Culture
Howard Abrams

* PHP - Architecting and Profiling for performance

A look at efficient PHP development through proper architecture and profiling tools.
Chemistry
Rasmus Lerdorf

* Project Management Should be Boring!

Many people see project management as the art of trying to please everyone and pleasing no one, while trying not to go too far over deadline and too far over budget. It doesn't have to be that way. Good project management can be so predictable and reliable that it's almost boring. Here's what works in real projects.
Cooking
Chromatic X

* Unit Test Your Database!

Given that the database, as the canonical repository of data, is the most important part of many applications, why is it that we don't write database unit tests? This talk promotes the practice of implementing tests to directly test the schema, storage, and functionality of databases.
Cooking
David Wheeler

* Using virtualization and automation to improve your web development workflow

Large-scale web projects use sophisticated staged deployment systems, but the prospect of setting these up can be daunting. Using virtualization and automated configuration puts the benefits within easy reach even for small projects. David Brewer explains how Second Story uses Linux, VMware Server, and AutomateIt to grease the wheels of development on their museum-sector projects.
Cooking
David Brewer

* Web Server Shootout

Deploying your .com behind nginx so you're ready to handle that flood of users on launch day? Wondering if you should use mod_python, mod_wsgi, or FastCGI to deploy your new Django project? This presentation will present comprehensive and practical benchmarks across a wide variety of metrics to help you make an informed decision.
Chemistry
Michael Schurter

* Web Testing with Windmill

This talk will discuss different web testing strategies, tools, and getting you up and writing windmill tests.
Cooking
Mikeal Rogers

* Write your own Bayesian Classifier: An Introduction to Machine Learning

Can you perform simple arithmetic? Do you know how to program well enough to open and read files? Then you can write a Bayesian classifier, one of the machine learning techniques for predicting categories, most famous for its use in spam filters. Let's demystify this impressively-named but ultimately simple process.
Cooking
John Melesky