Roan Kattouw's favorites

Favorite sessions for this user

* Become a Rocket Scientist With Open Source

The new space industry is expanding rapidly, with huge opportunities for open-source contributions. This talk focuses on the case study of Asterank, software that makes space data easier to access and explore. Its analysis and visualization tools have been used in government, private industry, and schools. The project has made public space data more open and usable for millions of people.
Hacks
Ian Webster

* Building #Resist at Meetup: Actual Corporate Activism in the Age of Trump

Learn how Meetup made the decision to create #Resist, a free network of over 1000 Meetups worldwide that anyone could organize with or join, and the questions we had to ask about how a private company could help self-empower the public in an actual way.
Activism
Yanyi .

* Containers: A Guide for the Perplexed

WTF are containers anyway? And what aren't they? And what is all this other ... stuff? Come find out.
Theory
Josh Berkus

* Debug Better: 2017 Edition

Debugging: the schedule destroyer, the confidence sapper, the mire in which thousands of working hours are lost every day. It’s time to stop staring at those four lines of code, desperately willing the solution to appear. This session is about the strategies that will steer you around bugs, tactics for dealing with them, and tools that can shorten a four-hour debugging session to five minutes.
Theory
Yoz Grahame

* Decoding the history of codes

The word "code" means different things to different people. In this talk, we explore cryptography and how it's evolved over time. We look at some key historical events and see how the art of encryption affected our lives.
Theory
Niharika Kohli

* Effective Presentations Using Applied Logical Fallacies

For many novice speakers, especially technical speakers, the hardest part of presenting is not figuring out what to put in but what to leave out. But what works for an academic paper doesn't work in a 10 minute presentation, and you risk boring your audience long before you manage to convince them of anything. This talk is intended to be a fun (and perhaps a bit silly) look at the science and the art of being convincing. I will cover how logical fallacies are used in propaganda, lying, and how you can use them to get your point across quickly. And don't worry, we'll also talk about how to do this ethically!
Practice
Terri Oda

* Falsehoods Programmers Believe About (Human) Languages - Common pitfalls in interface translation

Making open source software translatable is easy, right? You just take out all the strings, put them in a translation file in your git repository, and start accepting pull requests. Simple! Well, not so fast. There’s a lot more to this than meets the eye, and if you take a quick and dirty approach you’ll end up with upset translators, complaints from users, and mysteries like “what is ١٢٬٣٤٥٬٦٧٨ and why does my code want to parse that as a number?”. Thankfully, there are open source resources and libraries that can take care of these things for you.
Practice
Roan Kattouw

* How Can I Contribute?

This talk is for you, the documentarian, developer, student, or community member wondering what you can contribute to open source and how to get started. Lucy Wyman discusses several ways open source projects need your help, what to look for in a project you're contributing to, and some first steps to making your first pull request.
Culture
Lucy Wyman

* How I Went From Newbie to Open Source Project Owner

This is the story of how focusing first on building a community of individuals who care about mentoring has allowed me to turn the idea of mentor matching for people learning to code into a multi-platform open source project.
Culture
Kim Crayton

* How To Mentor Humans

I feel passionately that women and epecially minority women in tech need mentors and that those already in tech have a duty to step up for them, even though it means getting out of their comfort zone. How do you mentor minorities? How do you mentor anyone? With kindness and respect.
Culture
Letta Raven

* I Have ADD and So Can -- Ooh, Shiny!

Neurodiversity is the hidden diversity on our teams. Unlike obvious external markers, mental and personality quirks or invisible disabilities are not always easy for us to remember or adjust for. But sometimes diversity in this area is as important as any other.
Culture
Heidi Waterhouse

* It Can't Happen Here: But what if it does? Open-source alternative communication infrastructure

This talk will focus on what happens when the internet infrastructure we know and love goes down - by natural disaster or human-instigated shutdown (think Mubarak in Egypt during the Arab Spring).
Activism
jenka soderberg

* JavaScriptural Exegesis

If we're going to be so religious about our standards and patterns, why not use religious tools to analyze and improve them? Exegesis is a tool for nuance and understanding in the absolutes found on bikesheds everywhere, such as "replace all vars with const" and "arrow functions will save your eternal soul".
Theory
Michael Schoonmaker

* Keeping Secrets On Remote Machines

Conventional wisdom says that using the cloud means giving up privacy and control. But maybe crypto is actually literally magic and we can have our cake and eat it too? We're mostly not there yet, but let's talk about some of the ways that we're getting close.
Theory
Erica Portnoy

* Learn the lambda calculus and be a better programmer

Come learn an ancient model of pen & paper programming in order to change how you think about code
Theory
Clarissa Littler

* Liar Liar Pants on Fire: Being a Kid in the Tech World

A year and 4 months ago, I turned thirteen. According to many sites I use, however, I turned twenty-six. It’s a little odd, so here’s why:
Culture
Sebastian Waterhouse

* Outside Looking In: Working to Reshape the Cultural Memory of Tech

This presentation talks about how the culture of technology is built around the cultural influence of those who've come first to the table. We'll look into how these narratives are made, what we can do about it, and the best ways these narratives can be challenged to make tech more open and accommodating to those on the outside.
Culture
Josh Lim

* Quantum Computers and Where to Hide from Them

After making the smallest possible transistors, scientists are developing new computation methods based on quantum mechanics. This talk is an intro to: what makes quantum computing special, how to build assembly-like instructions for quantum computers in Python and JavaScript, and how we could start encrypting data to avoid quantum codebreaking.
Theory
Nick Doiron

* SVG: So Very Good

Icon fonts! CSS-only illustrations! High-resolution GIF animations! Today's web designers still regularly and enthusiastically employ these techniques... yet they're all a better fit for SVG, a powerful vector image format that's already old enough to drive a car.
Theory
Tyler Sticka

* Theory behind Image Compression and Semantic Search.

This talk will focus on describing a matrix decomposition technique called Singular Value Decomposition that conveys important geometrical and theoretical insights about linear transformations. This technique is not as famous as it should be given the range of applications from science and engineering.
Theory
Santi Adavani

* TIL There's a Microtonal Synth in My Browser!

Did you know there's a digital sound synthesizer in your browser? There is! It's called the Web Audio API and it's accessible from any JavaScript library or framework. I'll show you how I hacked Web Audio to make microtonal music in the browser.
Hacks
M Edward Borasky

* Translating Ancient Texts: The Nginx Parser

Find out what it took to get Certbot's Nginx parser working, which is an... exciting... tale at the intersection of programming language theory, regular expressions, formal grammars, and the utter lack of these in a fine, aged codebase.
Practice
Erica Portnoy

* Understanding Your Organization With Code Archaeology

Come on an expedition into the dark corners of your project's code basement, deep in that directory everyone avoids because it's filled with spiders and booby traps and two mysterious old versions of JQuery from 2012 that no one even remembers using. Instead of getting exasperated by variables called data and poor command-query separation, learn to use code archaeology as a way to understand your organization better.
Practice
Liss McCabe

* Unionizing Tech: Everybody needs a union

The Open Source Movement has a few defining traits, such as the the do-it-yourself, stick-it-to-the-man scrappiness; the caring about the people around us and their experience with the software or workplace; and, the way it is forever adaptable to the needs of the situation. Open source and unions have a lot in common - lets get started unionizing open source shops!
Culture
Sam Scott

* You Wouldn't Reimplement an API: Lessons from Oracle v. Google

Imagine being called for jury duty and then getting forced into a Java bootcamp run by two instructors who hate each other and won’t stop saying the opposite things. Worse, both instructors are inconsistent with themselves.
Culture
Sarah Jeong

* zulipbot: Solving GitHub workflow limitations and more

On a large open source project like Zulip, we were starting to see major productivity problems for the project, caused by longstanding limitations in GitHub’s permissions and notifications systems. Learn how we created zulipbot, an open source GitHub workflow bot written in Node.js, that patches these limitations in GitHub’s model and how you can use it to manage your own GitHub projects and organizations.
Practice
Joshua Pan