Chris Daley's favorites

Favorite sessions for this user

* A Community-Driven Future for Open Data Kit (ODK)

Open Data Kit (ODK) replaces paper surveys with smartphones. ODK tools are open-source and are primarily used by social good organizations to collect data quickly, accurately, offline, and at scale. ODK has been used to collect billions of data points around the world. In this talk, Yaw Anokwa and Hélène Martin, two of the leaders of the ODK community discuss the problems that inspired ODK’s design, demonstrate the impact the tools are having, and describe how the Open Source Bridge community can contribute to an open-source, community-driven future for mobile data collection tools.
Activism
Yaw Anokwa, Hélène Martin

* Become a Rocket Scientist With Open Source

The new space industry is expanding rapidly, with huge opportunities for open-source contributions. This talk focuses on the case study of Asterank, software that makes space data easier to access and explore. Its analysis and visualization tools have been used in government, private industry, and schools. The project has made public space data more open and usable for millions of people.
Hacks
Ian Webster

* Building #Resist at Meetup: Actual Corporate Activism in the Age of Trump

Learn how Meetup made the decision to create #Resist, a free network of over 1000 Meetups worldwide that anyone could organize with or join, and the questions we had to ask about how a private company could help self-empower the public in an actual way.
Activism
Yanyi .

* Effective Presentations Using Applied Logical Fallacies

For many novice speakers, especially technical speakers, the hardest part of presenting is not figuring out what to put in but what to leave out. But what works for an academic paper doesn't work in a 10 minute presentation, and you risk boring your audience long before you manage to convince them of anything. This talk is intended to be a fun (and perhaps a bit silly) look at the science and the art of being convincing. I will cover how logical fallacies are used in propaganda, lying, and how you can use them to get your point across quickly. And don't worry, we'll also talk about how to do this ethically!
Practice
Terri Oda

* Futel: The Network We Deserve

Futel has provided free public telephone service, telephone-mediated art, and live human interaction for several years, and was recognized as Portland's most prolific payphone installer of 2016. Now that we are finally living in the cyberpunk dystopia promised in the 80s, we are poised to seize this moment.
Activism
Karl Anderson

* Grassroots activism is hard. Can open source help?

Grassroots activists have to deal with many challenges - including the tools they’re using. Sounds like a great opportunity for open source! This session will survey progressive and transpartisan grassroots activists’ needs and today’s solutions (including techniques that work for explicitly intersectional groups), look at some existing open-source offerings and how they could evolve to better meet grassroots activists’ needs, and identify future directions that could be even more impactful.
Activism
Jon Pincus

* How To Mentor Humans

I feel passionately that women and epecially minority women in tech need mentors and that those already in tech have a duty to step up for them, even though it means getting out of their comfort zone. How do you mentor minorities? How do you mentor anyone? With kindness and respect.
Culture
Letta Raven

* How to Prototype and User Test: A Workshop

Prototype early and test often! Learn how to brainstorm an idea, create a simple paper prototype, and conduct some guerilla user tests.
Practice
morgan miller

* Introduction to Infrastructure Automation

Learn how to devops successfully while automating your infrastructure.
Practice
Jennifer Davis

* It Can't Happen Here: But what if it does? Open-source alternative communication infrastructure

This talk will focus on what happens when the internet infrastructure we know and love goes down - by natural disaster or human-instigated shutdown (think Mubarak in Egypt during the Arab Spring).
Activism
jenka soderberg

* Morning Keynote — Doing away with (bad) shibboleths

The developer community has many ways of determining who belongs and who doesn’t. Some of these are helpful, but others intimidate beginners who could go on to be good developers. This talk will provide a framework for differentiation between the good and the bad.
Activism
Walé Ogundipé

* Open Source Security for Activists: Changing the world and staying safe

Staying safe in dangerous times is no easy task, especially when you're speaking the truth to power. Despite giving a voice to millions, the internet is now also a place of danger for those who try to use it to amplify those voices and make them heard. I'll be talking about by my experiences as a Nonprofit Security Advisor using Open Source tools and knowledge to help keep activists safe at the coalface.
Activism
Chris Daley

* Out of the Game: How Apps Fail Oppressed Users (and what you can do to help)

Apps and websites routinely expose user information in service of social and interactive goals. But what happens when your user has a stalker? Many of these services will compromise the safety of users who are already at risk. Making things worse, some developers resist making changes, with justifications such as "If someone's in that much danger, they shouldn't be doing anything online," and "It's basically impossible to defend against a state actor." This overview will help developers take the risk factors into account, and make development decisions that puts control back into the hands of the users. There's no way to perfectly remove the risk of going online if you're in danger, but people will go online anyway. Many more users at risk are facing technically naive attackers than are facing highly skilled attackers such as state actors.
Activism
Alex Byrne, Azure Lunatic

* Outside Looking In: Working to Reshape the Cultural Memory of Tech

This presentation talks about how the culture of technology is built around the cultural influence of those who've come first to the table. We'll look into how these narratives are made, what we can do about it, and the best ways these narratives can be challenged to make tech more open and accommodating to those on the outside.
Culture
Josh Lim

* Sustainability in Open Source for International Development

Duplication of effort, flawed funding models, and overall lack of project maturity has led to the failure of most open source projects in the international development space. In this talk, we'll discuss the plans of the Digital Impact Alliance at the United Nations Foundation to help increase those projects' maturity, quality, and reach -- with a goal of advancing an inclusive digital society using open source for the poorest places on the planet.
Activism
Michael Downey, David McCann

* The Business of Open Source (or, how we think about it at CoreOS)

Peter Levine, a partner at Andreessen-Horowitz, famously said Red Hat would be the last successful OSS business. A dire forecast for the multitudes building their business atop of open source today. This talk is will dive into basic economic theory, how we’ve applied it at CoreOS, and ultimately describe what the current and next generation of open source business looks like.
Culture
Elsie Phillips, Paul Burt

* The Existential Tester: How to Assess Risk and Prioritize Tests

To test, or not to test? That is the question. With limited time and resources there are only so many tests we can write and run. How do you determine what features of a new project to test? How do you know when a test is obsolete, or needs to be updated? What gets run per-commit, nightly, or weekly? What should you test manually? This talk will give you a framework for thinking about how to assess risk on a project and prioritize your
Theory
Lucy Wyman

* The Set of Programmers: How Math Restricts Us

People new to programming often have to work through barriers of language and learning in order to become proficient and being contributing. Does one of those barriers need to be one's math skills? Most schools and textbooks seem to think so. Let's discuss how we're introducing new developers to programming and whether we can make it more inclusive by removing the mathematics and replacing it with logic.
Culture
Carol Smith

* Unionizing Tech: Everybody needs a union

The Open Source Movement has a few defining traits, such as the the do-it-yourself, stick-it-to-the-man scrappiness; the caring about the people around us and their experience with the software or workplace; and, the way it is forever adaptable to the needs of the situation. Open source and unions have a lot in common - lets get started unionizing open source shops!
Culture
Sam Scott

* Writing Inclusively about Technology Topics

Based on The Responsible Communication Style Guide, this workshop is an introduction to the concepts in the style guide. It also covers how a style guide can be an effective part of the workflow when creating and promoting technology projects (including open source).
Culture
Thursday Bram