Joshua Pan's favorites

Favorite sessions for this user

* 24 Hours of Awesome: Science Hack Day Portland

Science Hack Day is a free-to-attend, open-source, worldwide, volunteer-organized event aimed at bringing together scientists, developers, engineers, students, and anyone else passionate or curious about science. The goal is simple: in 24 hours form a team and make something (fun, useful, nonsensical, anything!) with science. Hear from the organizers of the first Science Hack Day in Portland on how it was put together, just how awesome it was, and how open (science, source, hardware, web) played a vital part.
Culture
Jessica Hardwicke, Lilly Winfree

* Hi! It takes more than engineering skills to make your company successful. Let's talk about it.

Let's be real: tech companies value engineering skills over most other skills, and it shows in both salaries and decisionmaking. This talk is about why this happens, why it's problematic, and how we can refocus importance on all the skills that make companies successful.
Culture
Lyzi Diamond

* How Can I Contribute?

This talk is for you, the documentarian, developer, student, or community member wondering what you can contribute to open source and how to get started. Lucy Wyman discusses several ways open source projects need your help, what to look for in a project you're contributing to, and some first steps to making your first pull request.
Culture
Lucy Wyman

* How I Went From Newbie to Open Source Project Owner

This is the story of how focusing first on building a community of individuals who care about mentoring has allowed me to turn the idea of mentor matching for people learning to code into a multi-platform open source project.
Culture
Kim Crayton

* How To Mentor Humans

I feel passionately that women and epecially minority women in tech need mentors and that those already in tech have a duty to step up for them, even though it means getting out of their comfort zone. How do you mentor minorities? How do you mentor anyone? With kindness and respect.
Culture
Letta Raven

* How to Prototype and User Test: A Workshop

Prototype early and test often! Learn how to brainstorm an idea, create a simple paper prototype, and conduct some guerilla user tests.
Practice
morgan miller

* I Have ADD and So Can -- Ooh, Shiny!

Neurodiversity is the hidden diversity on our teams. Unlike obvious external markers, mental and personality quirks or invisible disabilities are not always easy for us to remember or adjust for. But sometimes diversity in this area is as important as any other.
Culture
Heidi Waterhouse

* JavaScriptural Exegesis

If we're going to be so religious about our standards and patterns, why not use religious tools to analyze and improve them? Exegesis is a tool for nuance and understanding in the absolutes found on bikesheds everywhere, such as "replace all vars with const" and "arrow functions will save your eternal soul".
Theory
Michael Schoonmaker

* Keeping Secrets On Remote Machines

Conventional wisdom says that using the cloud means giving up privacy and control. But maybe crypto is actually literally magic and we can have our cake and eat it too? We're mostly not there yet, but let's talk about some of the ways that we're getting close.
Theory
Erica Portnoy

* Learn the lambda calculus and be a better programmer

Come learn an ancient model of pen & paper programming in order to change how you think about code
Theory
Clarissa Littler

* Learn to Type at 250 WPM Using Open Source Tools

The Open Steno Project is dedicated to the creation of open source software, hardware, and educational materials to bring machine stenography to the masses! Want to be a speed demon typist like the court reporters you see in movies? Now you can!
Practice
Josh Lifton

* Liar Liar Pants on Fire: Being a Kid in the Tech World

A year and 4 months ago, I turned thirteen. According to many sites I use, however, I turned twenty-six. It’s a little odd, so here’s why:
Culture
Sebastian Waterhouse

* Modern Keyboarding: How to Design, Build, and Hack

See how easy and cheap it is to design and build your own ergonomic keyboard with open hardware and software.
Practice
Micah Elliott

* Quantum Computers and Where to Hide from Them

After making the smallest possible transistors, scientists are developing new computation methods based on quantum mechanics. This talk is an intro to: what makes quantum computing special, how to build assembly-like instructions for quantum computers in Python and JavaScript, and how we could start encrypting data to avoid quantum codebreaking.
Theory
Nick Doiron

* Quick and Dirty WordPress Sites That Don't Suck

If you're on a budget but you need a website that doesn't suck and actually helps your business / organization / cause, I'll show you how to create one for under $1000 / year and a lot of sweat equity.
Hacks
Kronda Adair

* Running Just the Test Cases You Need

When you're writing software, fast feedback is key. The less you have to wait for your tests to run, the sooner you'll know whether or not your code is correct. Ruby's two main test frameworks (minitest and RSpec) support several different techniques for testing only what you need for what you're currently working on, and nothing more. In this talk, we'll go through several of these practices for both frameworks, each more automated and awesome than the last.
Practice
Ian Dees

* Seasons of Debian - Summer of Code and Winter of Outreachy

A talk about Google Summer of Code and Outreachy Internship Program with Debian. Discusses Urvika Gola and Pranav Jain’s work with Debian on an open source project for an android ‘Lumicall’ application.
Culture
Urvika Gola, Pranav Jain

* The Existential Tester: How to Assess Risk and Prioritize Tests

To test, or not to test? That is the question. With limited time and resources there are only so many tests we can write and run. How do you determine what features of a new project to test? How do you know when a test is obsolete, or needs to be updated? What gets run per-commit, nightly, or weekly? What should you test manually? This talk will give you a framework for thinking about how to assess risk on a project and prioritize your
Theory
Lucy Wyman

* The Hardest Problem in Tech(nical Interviewing) is People: The personal skills in interviewing

Technical interviews can be intimidating, but it’s easier if you have confidence in yourself and your ability to answer complicated questions. The hardest questions are not about sorting algorithms, but how you’ll work in a team, how you’ll resolve conflicts, and what it will be like to manage and work with you. This workshop exists to address the skills and theories of presenting yourself as confident, capable, and coachable.
Culture
Carol Smith, Heidi Waterhouse

* The Set of Programmers: How Math Restricts Us

People new to programming often have to work through barriers of language and learning in order to become proficient and being contributing. Does one of those barriers need to be one's math skills? Most schools and textbooks seem to think so. Let's discuss how we're introducing new developers to programming and whether we can make it more inclusive by removing the mathematics and replacing it with logic.
Culture
Carol Smith

* Why Is a Raven Like a Pull Request: What Writing Workshops Can Bring to Code Reviews

Many talks aimed at beginners to open source contribution assume that concepts like peer review and justification of intent are brand new. If you have ever experienced the thrills–and/or horrors–of a writing workshop, many ideas central to a successful pull request aren't that new at all. Let's talk about what experienced workshoppers and the field of writing critique can bring to your OS project.
Culture
Christine Bryant-Ryback

* zulipbot: Solving GitHub workflow limitations and more

On a large open source project like Zulip, we were starting to see major productivity problems for the project, caused by longstanding limitations in GitHub’s permissions and notifications systems. Learn how we created zulipbot, an open source GitHub workflow bot written in Node.js, that patches these limitations in GitHub’s model and how you can use it to manage your own GitHub projects and organizations.
Practice
Joshua Pan

Favorite proposals for this user

* Emacs's org-mode: a writing and organizing multitool

This talk will present org-mode, a package for the emacs editor, as a tool useful for everything from writing talks, to keeping a journal, organizing your todos, and developing literate code
Hacks 2017-03-31 19:09:47 +0000
Clarissa Littler

* Starting Early – Open Source through Google Code-in

A talk about Google Code-in experience, the opportunities it provides for high school students, why we need more programs/contests like this, and the importance of mentorship to younger contributors.
Culture 2017-04-10 06:00:32 +0000
Joshua Pan

* Teaching Undergraduates how to contribute to Open Source

Surprisingly, most college students, even those enrolled in a CS program, don't really know what Open Source means. What does Open Source mean? What is the difference between each of the most popular Open Source licenses? What development tools and processes do you need to be familiar with to begin to contribute to an Open Source project? How do you evaluate an Open Source project to determine if it is the right one for you? How do you gain enough confidence to submit your first pull request to a live open source project?
Culture 2017-03-31 20:38:22 +0000
Chadd Williams