Matt Youell's favorites

Open Source Bridge 2013

Favorite sessions for this user

* !done - Hacking IRC Bots for Distributed Teams

When our company was acquired we needed a way to see everything that was done each day all in one place. Teams were using different methods to do this: standups, written reports, emails and meetings. Nothing stuck. Done reports introduces a simple IRC command: !done. Team members say !done and what they just did. These !dones are put into a daily report. !done becomes a part of everyday at work, not a strained task that’s easily forgotten.
Culture
Amber Case, Aaron Parecki

* Balloon & Kite Mapping Workshop

Low-budget, no budget, need aerial images fast? Learn to map with balloons and kites.
Hacks
Mathew Lippincott

* Bitcoin and the Law - Whither Transactions?

How does Bitcoin interact with the Uniform Electronic Transactions Act and other laws regulating ecommerce? Do those acts even contemplate a decentralized currency? Where do we go from here?
Business
J-P Voilleque

* Cool Features of the Z Shell (zsh)

Z Shell is a UNIX shell with a bunch of cool features. Learn about installing and configuring zsh with some of my favorite features.
Cooking
Michael Pigg

* Custom Markup for Working and Writing

We show how both doing work and writing about work are enhanced by special purpose markup hosted by federated wiki plugins.
Hacks
Ward Cunningham

* How My Kids Are Learning to Program By Talking

My children have patiently tolerated a number of teach-STEM-quick schemes their dad has brought home. They've taught robots to dance, created simple animations using Scratch, and, quite frankly, made a lot of poop jokes. What's missing from these programming tools was storytelling. The ones we tried focused either on easy interactivity or expressive power. If only there were a way to combine the two... oh, wait, there was—46 years ago!
Culture
Ian Dees

* It's OK to be Average

Open Source communities are often full of "the one who invented ___" people. They've written RFCs, gotten patents, published software that's already installed on every computer you'll ever buy. It can be kind of intimidating. But there's room for more than that--and welcoming more people can improve your project exponentially!
Culture
Noirin Plunkett

* Kicking Impostor Syndrome In The Head

Impostor syndrome -- the persistent belief that any minute everyone around you is going to figure out you're not at all qualified -- happens to a majority of the tech industry; nobody talks about it, because nobody wants to be the first to admit it. This talk confronts that feeling head-on, and addresses ways to readjust your perceptions of your accomplishments to accurately reflect reality.
Culture
Denise Paolucci

* Low-Friction Personal Data Collection

Have you ever wanted to track your movements, sleep, what you eat, who you spend time with, and all sorts of other personal data? In this talk I'll describe the tools I've been able to successfully use to track aspects of my life.
Cooking
Aaron Parecki

* Robotron Autopsy: Learning About Hardware From Vintage Video Games

Studying and building hardware is easier than you think. Using software concepts as a metaphor, I will reverse-engineer the 1982 arcade game machine "Robotron: 2084" and reimplement it in modern hardware.
Hacks
Jared Boone

* Rust: A Friendly Introduction

Conventional wisdom says that writing high-performance code means working without the safety net of credible compile-time safety checks. Mozilla Research (a community of researchers, engineers, and volunteers) is trying to prove that conventional wisdom wrong by building Rust, a new systems programming language. Rust takes advantage of well-understood programming language technology to combine aggressive compile-time error checking with the high degree of direct control over the machine necessary to write efficient systems programs. By way of examples, I'll teach you how to use Rust to write fast and trustworthy code.
Cooking
Tim Chevalier

Favorite proposals for this user

* Handcrafted Code? The Programmer in the Age of the Artisan

Culture is diverging in serious and interesting ways. Mass-production is at an all-time high, but a parallel development praises traditional, pre-technological production practices. We lust after devices too shiny to have been made by human hands, and use them to snap photos of organic coffee we insist be roasted less than a mile away. What is the future for programmers in this age? Are we to be replaced eventually by automation, or will there always be a place for "handcrafted code"?
Culture 2013-03-09 23:42:44 +0000
Jonathan Lipps

* How to (Almost) Kill a Successful Project and then Bring It Back to Life: Lessons Learned from the Xen Project

In the decade the Xen Project has been in existence, it has seen great success. It also almost collapsed because of certain community and business decisions. We will deliver lessons learned so that other projects can avoid these pitfalls.
Culture 2013-03-09 21:18:19 +0000
Russell Pavlicek

* Tech, Bikes, Transit & Lifestyle Options to improve your Programming

I'll be diving deep to discuss the benefits of living well to do better programming. I'll talk about the statistics and data behind dropping the auto-dependent mindset and stepping into the world of cycling, meetups, urban living, clean eating and ways to dramatically improve your innovation, entrepreneurial activities and why these things are connected. As I like to say, "How to get and stay at 100%."
Culture 2013-01-17 22:11:34 +0000
Adron Hall

* What the Hell Just Happened? How to kill great ideas and alienate everyone by mismanaging your project.

You had the best idea ever. You even had everyone convinced it was the best idea ever. You had a proven plan for project management strategy. But now your best idea is smoldering on the ground, and everyone is running for the exits. What the hell just happened?
Business 2013-03-20 22:27:58 +0000
Chris Chiacchierini

Open Source Bridge 2012

Favorite sessions for this user

* <Your Favorite Programming Language> Loses

Every programming language ever created has some horrible mistakes: your favorite is no exception. We'll talk about some fundamental principles of PL design and how they fail to play out in various real languages.
Chemistry
Bart Massey

* Adventures in Hipster Programming: Solving a Math Puzzle Using a Genetic Algorithm Programmed in OCaml

I heard Will Shortz pose a mathematical puzzle on NPR on a Sunday Morning in January and I thought, "Hey, I can solve that with a genetic algorithm!" In OCaml. I'll show you how in this talk.
Cooking
Phil Tomson

* Beyond Excel: Bringing Web Connected Science to… Scientists

Come learn how team Hydrasi is partnering with scientific organizations to combine Open Source technologies and give them tools they never realized they could have. We'll blend stories of working with organizations such as DEQ, NOAA, and the Army Corps with your own story to explore ways scientists can partner with techies to make the world a better place.
Business
John Metta, Bill Jackson

* Building a Visual Editor for Wikipedia

Why isn’t editing Wikipedia as easy as using a word processor? Want to know how to build a reliable rich text editor in a web browser? Learn about how we are building a Wikitext visual editor, and how you can get involved!
Chemistry
Roan Kattouw, Trevor Parscal

* Building the Open Source Battle Rifle

A look at the technical and legal issues surrounding home construction of firearms, focusing on semi-automatic AK-47 style rifles.
Hacks
Beth Flanagan

* Dark Arts of Data Storage: What's Your Filesystem up to?

Ever wonder what happens to your data between the write() call and the disk drive? Or feel the need to scrape your bits off the drive after an accident? If so, this talk is for you! Come learn the dark art of how filesystems work.
Chemistry
Darrick Wong

* Developing and Using Pluggable Type Systems

A pluggable type system extends a language's built-in type system to confer additional compile-time guarantees. We will explain the theory and practice of pluggable types.
Cooking
Werner Dietl, Michael Ernst

* From OAuth to IndieAuth: Own Your Online Identity

Sick of writing sign-in code? Not sure whether to support Twitter logins, Facebook logins, or both? Try IndieAuth! IndieAuth, built on top of OAuth, is a new way to sign in to websites online using your own domain name. This talk will show how OAuth and OpenID paved the way for IndieAuth, and will provide details about how to use this on your own websites.
Hacks
Aaron Parecki

* Future of Wearable Computing: Constraint, Context and Location

Google will release a wearable heads up display this fall, and it may help to usher in a new era of augmented reality and wearable computing. What does this mean for us? How do we build for the next generation of machines? Who was here before us, and how can we learn from them?
Hacks
Amber Case

* Go Go Gallimaufry

At one point it was popular to refer to the eyes as windows to the soul, and common wisdom accepted that you could learn a great deal about a person's inner thoughts by looking at their eyes. Then that notion fell out of fashion, except perhaps in love songs. But once we learned how to track people's eye motions, record them, and analyse the data, we realized that there may have been something to it.
Chemistry
Markus Roberts

* Open Source Music

What kind of open source music can you make? All kinds! Let's get our feet wet and jam!
Hacks
Cameron Adamez

* Understand "Inform 7" as Teh Awesome.

Y'know those "Interactive Fiction" (IF) text-adventure thingies? Inform 7 is a language for writing IF in the style of English prose. It's also a neat idea for general modeling. Let's build a simple world together while learning some of what Inform 7 is about.
Chemistry
Bart Massey

* What Is My Kernel Doing?

Ever wonder what your kernel is doing? We instrumented kernels on both web servers and personal workstations, and then measured to see what they're doing.
Chemistry
Randy Appleton

* When Google Maps Gives You Lemons, Make Lemonade

Make your life sweeter by replacing Google Maps with open-source alternatives.
Cooking
Wm Leler

* Why You Need to Host 100 New Wikis Just for Yourself

The Federated Wiki offers a new form of conversation well suited for charting our collective future.
Culture
Ward Cunningham

* Wise Asana

Yoga returns to Open Source Bridge! Come with your stiff shoulders, sore wrists, tight hips and aching back. Leave with ideas on how to incorporate 5 minutes of practice into your busy day to care for your body and mind.
Culture
Sherri Koehler

* ZenIRCBot and the Art of Pub/Sub

How Pub/Sub helped my IRC bot stop living in the past and live in the moment. Also, special bonus features for polyglots!
Chemistry
Wraithan (Chris McDonald)

Favorite proposals for this user

* Life, Zen, and the API

The concept of the API, we all know it, we all use it, but do we really understand it? This talk seeks to deconstruct the API and discuss it's usefulness for everything from your web app, to your coffee, to your marriage
Chemistry 2012-02-11 00:48:14 +0000
John Metta

* Reinventing the Wheel

They say you shouldn't reinvent the wheel, but imagine driving a car with 4 stone tires. In this session we're going to talk about why you SHOULD reinvent the wheel and how to do so successfully.
Cooking 2012-02-27 19:49:36 +0000
Michael Stowe

* Small business mistakes

You have a great business idea and your friends and colleagues are supportive and tell you that you can do it. The forms have been filled in, you've said goodbye to your rat-race job, and you're investing your energy into getting things done. Still, despite how compelling your idea is, you're not making any money and your savings are dwindling. What are you doing wrong? Come to this talk to find out a list of common small business mistakes.
Business 2012-03-27 05:18:07 +0000
Jacinta Richardson

* VoteFair ranking: Math-based voting power for the 99%

Just-released open-source software that implements VoteFair ranking is now available to help us reach higher levels of voting fairness. You do voting when you click on Google results, and you use voting results when you view the star rating of an Amazon product. Now learn how voting really works, how it is usually miscalculated -- intentionally in the case of elections -- and how it can be done to fully extract the wisdom in a group. Learn the math behind the puppet strings that connect politicians to the biggest campaign contributors. (Partial spoiler: The biggest unfairness is hidden in primary elections.) Also learn the math that eventually will cut those puppet strings. Along the way you will learn that there are different kinds of popularity.
Chemistry 2012-02-07 01:46:38 +0000
Richard Fobes

Open Source Bridge 2010

Favorite sessions for this user

* Open Source Rockets

PSAS is a student aerospace engineering project at Portland State University. We're building ultra-low-cost, open hardware and open source rockets that feature perhaps the most sophisticated amateur rocket avionics systems out there today.
Hacks
Nathan Bergey, Andrew Greenberg

* (CANCELLED) Getting Started with FPGAs and HDLs

Lots of attention has been given to GPUs for speeding up certain types of computations. While GPUs are very well suited for vector operations, there are other things they are not so well suited for. FPGAs (Field Programmable Gate Arrays) are not used as widely yet, but they offer a much more flexible computing fabric than GPUs. You can implement a GPU in an FPGA, for example, or you could implement your own custom processor optimized for very specialized tasks. The barrier to entry can be high for FPGAs: how does a person with a software development background get started using them? And what about HDLs (Hardware Description Langauges) used to program FPGAs? What's the difference between simulation and synthesis? What kinds of tools are freely available? These are some of the questions that will be addressed in this session.
Cooking
Phil Tomson

* Agile User Experience Design

Agile processes can be very successful for both clients and developers, but the rapid pace and the lack of detailed long-term plans can make it difficult to design and build high quality user experiences. We'll talk about good ways to do that.
Cooking
Randall Hansen

* Building A Mesh Network Wireless Temperature Sensor

The problem: My HVAC system is not balanced. Easy but boring solution: Hire a qualified contractor to fix it. More interesting solution: Use knowledge from dusty undergrad degree in electronics to cobble together some simple wireless temperature sensors using XBee modules and distribute them around the house. Then use Java programming knowledge to build up a monitoring system using open source software. Attempt to use readings from temperature sensors to figure out what's going on and fix it. This presentation will delve into the hardware and software aspects of the system, although with more emphasis on the software and the role that packages such as Apache Felix and Apache Mina play in the system.
Hacks
Michael Pigg

* Cassandra: Strategies for Distributed Data Storage

Cassandra is an open source, highly scalable distributed database that brings together Dynamo's fully distributed design and Bigtable's ColumnFamily-based data model. In this talk we'll discuss the strategies Cassandra employs to provide an eventually consistent data model.
Chemistry
Kelvin Kakugawa

* Copyright lawyers can Gödel

"This compression algorithm is of course very inefficient, at least when applied to a small collection of documents. But if you were to apply it to a larger collection, say, all the music ever recorded and all movies ever made, some gains may be realized...
Hacks
Markus Roberts

* Hair and Yak Again -- A Hacker's Tale

API design, parallelism, automated testing, parallel automated testing, deployment, build tools, meta programming, GUI design and construction, hardware interfaces, network protocols, databases, change tracking, file formats, and why simple software becomes an epic journey.
Chemistry
Eric Wilhelm

* HyperCard 2010: Why Johnny Can't Code (and What We Can Do About It)

Thomas Jefferson envisioned a nation of self-sufficient citizen farmers; programmers like Alan Kay and Bill Atkinson tried to help us code as easily as we might hang a poster on the wall. What happened to the HyperCard ideal? Have we settled for consumption over creation? I will explore the question through a case study, surveying the state of citizen programming in 2010 — from CouchApps to Shoes to plain-jane HTML5+JS to HyperCard 2.4 — and try to convince all comers that realizing the dream of the citizen coder is vital to continuing the ideals of open source.
Culture
Devin Chalmers

* Making Robots Accessible to Everyone

I've been looking for an affordable, flexible, easy to learn robotics platform for years that I could use to teach kids the basics of programming/electronics/robotics. Last Fall, I finally found it.
Culture
Brett Nelson, Jim Larson

* Multicore Haskell Now!

Multicore computers are here: is your programming language ready?
Hacks
Don Stewart

* Release your hardware hacker potential with gEDA

Ever wanted to create your own printed circuit board? There are open source tools for that. This session will take you step-by-step through the process of creating a printed circuit board using the gEDA suite of electronic design automation tools. Beginners are welcome, no previous hardware experience required.
Cooking
Eric Thompson

* The $2 computer: ultraconstrained devices do your bidding

"Do you watch television? Is your furnace loud? Do you have $2?" My 7-year-old's marketing suggestions aside, building custom gadgets to improve your life is remarkably simple, and I'll prove it by building something on stage that you can duplicate at home.
Hacks
David Hollingsworth

* The Naive Developer's Guide to Venture Capital

What you need to know before you even think about raising venture or angel capital, presented by a Silicon Valley founder who raised $9m from top tier firms.
Business
Joyce Park

* Unlikely tools for pair programming

Co-conspirators Jamey Sharp and Josh Triplett get up to a lot of miscellaneous hacking mischief together. Much of this hacking occurs while staring at the same screen, and tag-teaming the keyboard. Sometimes this happens with the two of them in different places. We'll demo our favorite tools and invite audience contributions to the discussion.
Cooking
Jamey Sharp, Josh Triplett

* Using Modern Perl

Since 2001, Perl 5 has undergone a renaissance. Modern Perl programs are powerful, maintainable, and understandable. Come learn how to take advantage of perl circa 2010.
Cooking
Chromatic X

* When Everything Looks Like A Nail

Markus: Nautilus? I thought you said noodle house! Matt: Wait, wait, I think I see her head!! Markus: Are you sure? Matt: Maybe It's Not Her Head...
Hacks
Markus Roberts, Matt Youell

* Your Internets are Leaking

Using your computer on a public network is like having a conversation on a city bus: people you don't know can hear everything you say. They'll probably be polite and ignore you, but you still might not want to shout out your credit card number. Yet this is what your computer does. All the time. And you don't know it.
Cooking
Reid Beels, Michael Schwern

Open Source Bridge 2009

Favorite sessions for this user

* Spindle, Mutilate and Metaprogram: How far _can_ you push it before there be dragons?

Maybe the edge isn’t as close as we thought it was. Maybe you can do some really funky things with your language without accidentally summoning eldritch spirits. Or maybe not. The only way to find out is to try it—or, if you are of the more prudent proclivities, to watch someone else try it.
Hacks
Markus Roberts, Matt Youell