Maja Frydrychowicz's favorites

Favorite sessions for this user

* Containers: A Guide for the Perplexed

WTF are containers anyway? And what aren't they? And what is all this other ... stuff? Come find out.
Theory
Josh Berkus

* Debug Better: 2017 Edition

Debugging: the schedule destroyer, the confidence sapper, the mire in which thousands of working hours are lost every day. It’s time to stop staring at those four lines of code, desperately willing the solution to appear. This session is about the strategies that will steer you around bugs, tactics for dealing with them, and tools that can shorten a four-hour debugging session to five minutes.
Theory
Yoz Grahame

* Democratizing Data: What You Need to Know as a Developer to Keep Your Data Collection and Usage Ethical

By 2020 each person will create 1.7 MB of new data per second flooding us in 44 trillion GB of data! What’s this mean? From Uber’s “ride of shame” scandal to the role of Facebook’s news recommender in the presidential election we as developers must ask how we use data and what the implications are for open source software.
Activism
Lorena Mesa

* Design Automata: The DevOps Approach To User Interface Design

How-To-Create rapid, reusable, web-based User Interface design prototypes with Open Source tools and Creative Commons licensed assets
Practice
Skyler Reed

* How to load 1m lines of Ruby in 5s

How do you load code faster? Load less of it! I'll talk about how we used static analysis and aggressive refactoring to reduce the time to reload code after a change by 85%.
Hacks
Paul Tarjan

* How to Pay People for Their Work

Paying people for their work is radical, whether we're talking about open source contributions, second-shift diversity work, or even care at home. But giving people the resources necessary to make these community contributions is the only way to make our communities more sustainable.
Culture
Thursday Bram

* I Have ADD and So Can -- Ooh, Shiny!

Neurodiversity is the hidden diversity on our teams. Unlike obvious external markers, mental and personality quirks or invisible disabilities are not always easy for us to remember or adjust for. But sometimes diversity in this area is as important as any other.
Culture
Heidi Waterhouse

* Importance of communication (Effective Communication) in Open Source communities

Open Source communities are excellent example of most diverse and globally spread work-space. Although, this is a major plus and feels amazing to work in such a diverse culture, but at the same time we need to face the challenge of accurate communication.
Culture
Amita Sharma

* In 1968 Mom built a computer: women's routes as technologists

On the surface, this story shares vignettes about my Mom. But its purpose is to increase awareness of human resources in technology, and overlooked pathways of young technologiests. "c. 1973 RCA hired her for the chip prototyping lab. Her new co-workers compared each other's crochet at lunch. A marathon week of late-night needlework bought her acceptance and promotion to supervisor. She told me stories about the ladies who wrapped wires for NASA a few years before, about women's centuries of fingers in technical fiber-crafts finally being noticed when it put men on the moon."
Culture
Katheryn Sutter

* Introduction to Infrastructure Automation

Learn how to devops successfully while automating your infrastructure.
Practice
Jennifer Davis

* JavaScriptural Exegesis

If we're going to be so religious about our standards and patterns, why not use religious tools to analyze and improve them? Exegesis is a tool for nuance and understanding in the absolutes found on bikesheds everywhere, such as "replace all vars with const" and "await is the new Promise".
Theory
Michael Schoonmaker

* Keeping Secrets On Remote Machines

Conventional wisdom says that using the cloud means giving up privacy and control. But maybe crypto is actually literally magic and we can have our cake and eat it too? We're mostly not there yet, but let's talk about some of the ways that we're getting close.
Theory
Erica Portnoy

* Learn to Type at 250 WPM Using Open Source Tools

The Open Steno Project is dedicated to the creation of open source software, hardware, and educational materials to bring machine stenography to the masses! Want to be a speed demon typist like the court reporters you see in movies? Now you can!
Practice
Josh Lifton

* Morning Keynote — Doing away with (bad) shibboleths

The developer community has many ways of determining who belongs and who doesn’t. Some of these are helpful, but others intimidate beginners who could go on to be good developers. This talk will provide a framework for differentiation between the good and the bad.
Activism
Walé Ogundipé

* Morning Keynote — Fake Science! Sad! A case study of the perils of Open Data

Open source allows anyone to use their skills to change the world--for better or for worse. In an era where the phrase "Fake News!" echoes from the highest office of the land, we have to cast a critical eye on the works that we promote and participate in. Open Data is no exception, and the use of Open Data to generate Fake Analyses is a real issue that can undermine social progress.
Activism
Emily Gorcenski

* Morning Keynote — Tech Reform

Nicole will talk to us about Tech Reform
Culture
Nicole Sanchez

* Open Source Security for Activists: Changing the world and staying safe

Staying safe in dangerous times is no easy task, especially when you're speaking the truth to power. Despite giving a voice to millions, the internet is now also a place of danger for those who try to use it to amplify those voices and make them heard. I'll be talking about by my experiences as a Nonprofit Security Advisor using Open Source tools and knowledge to help keep activists safe at the coalface.
Activism
Chris Daley

* Out of the Game: How Apps Fail Oppressed Users (and what you can do to help)

Apps and websites routinely expose user information in service of social and interactive goals. But what happens when your user has a stalker? Many of these services will compromise the safety of users who are already at risk. Making things worse, some developers resist making changes, with justifications such as "If someone's in that much danger, they shouldn't be doing anything online," and "It's basically impossible to defend against a state actor." This overview will help developers take the risk factors into account, and make development decisions that puts control back into the hands of the users. There's no way to perfectly remove the risk of going online if you're in danger, but people will go online anyway. Many more users at risk are facing technically naive attackers than are facing highly skilled attackers such as state actors.
Activism
Alex Byrne, Azure Lunatic

* Outside Looking In: Working to Reshape the Cultural Memory of Tech

This presentation talks about how the culture of technology is built around the cultural influence of those who've come first to the table. We'll look into how these narratives are made, what we can do about it, and the best ways these narratives can be challenged to make tech more open and accommodating to those on the outside.
Culture
Josh Lim

* Quantum Computers and Where to Hide from Them

After making the smallest possible transistors, scientists are developing new computation methods based on quantum mechanics. This talk is an intro to: what makes quantum computing special, how to build assembly-like instructions for quantum computers in Python and JavaScript, and how we could start encrypting data to avoid quantum codebreaking.
Theory
Nick Doiron

* Quick and Dirty WordPress Sites That Don't Suck

If you're on a budget but you need a website that doesn't suck and actually helps your business / organization / cause, I'll show you how to create one for under $1000 / year and a lot of sweat equity.
Hacks
Kronda Adair

* Read, Write, Talk, Sing, Play: What Early Literacy Can Teach Us About Software Literacy

I'm not saying that you have to speak parentese to beginning software learners. They might be quite offended with you doing that, actually. What beginners often need, though, is not just to be set in front of a tutorial and told to come back when they're finished, but to have someone on hand to bounce questions off of or to talk them through problems and exercises so that they understand. Learners often pick up useful information by observing someone else at work using the language, but they can't just be there while you do things and learn it all by observation alone. One of the best skills a librarian has that goes mostly unnoticed is that they're really great at narrating themselves to others. When demonstrating (sometimes for the sixteenth time) how to go through a procedure to obtain resources or run searches, librarians narrate what they are doing and why. When reading a book to tiny people, youth services librarians often ask questions about what the characters are doing or feeling, so that the tiny people can use both the text and the pictures to decode what's going on in the story. Key information about the story is often communicated visually in a picture book, and sometimes in complete contradiction to the text. By providing scaffolding through narration, the librarian provides context and reasoning for the actions they're taking. By asking questions at regular intervals, the librarian can check to make sure understanding is happening and adjust to include perspectives they may not have been taking into account before. [...] Talking and explaining things to your learners, and with each other, is the best way to help them learn. So if you get the opportunity to have someone shadow you and ask you annoying questions about what you're doing and why you're doing it that way, take up the opportunity. (And request it all gets documented. Trust me.) By talking through things with someone who doesn't have your expertise, you shore up your own knowledge and help someone get more of their own. That leads to literacy.
Culture
Alex Byrne

* Running Just the Test Cases You Need

When you're writing software, fast feedback is key. The less you have to wait for your tests to run, the sooner you'll know whether or not your code is correct. Ruby's two main test frameworks (minitest and RSpec) support several different techniques for testing only what you need for what you're currently working on, and nothing more. In this talk, we'll go through several of these practices for both frameworks, each more automated and awesome than the last.
Practice
Ian Dees

* The Business of Open Source (or, how we think about it at CoreOS)

Peter Levine, a partner at Andreessen-Horowitz, famously said Red Hat would be the last successful OSS business. A dire forecast for the multitudes building their business atop of open source today. This talk is will dive into basic economic theory, how we’ve applied it at CoreOS, and ultimately describe what the current and next generation of open source business looks like.
Culture
Elsie Phillips, Paul Burt

* The Existential Tester: How to Assess Risk and Prioritize Tests

To test, or not to test? That is the question. With limited time and resources there are only so many tests we can write and run. How do you determine what features of a new project to test? How do you know when a test is obsolete, or needs to be updated? What gets run per-commit, nightly, or weekly? What should you test manually? This talk will give you a framework for thinking about how to assess risk on a project and prioritize your
Theory
Lucy Wyman

* The Hardest Problem in Tech(nical Interviewing) is People: The personal skills in interviewing

Technical interviews can be intimidating, but it’s easier if you have confidence in yourself and your ability to answer complicated questions. The hardest questions are not about sorting algorithms, but how you’ll work in a team, how you’ll resolve conflicts, and what it will be like to manage and work with you. This workshop exists to address the skills and theories of presenting yourself as confident, capable, and coachable.
Culture
Carol Smith, Heidi Waterhouse

* The Set of Programmers: How Math Restricts Us

People new to programming often have to work through barriers of language and learning in order to become proficient and being contributing. Does one of those barriers need to be one's math skills? Most schools and textbooks seem to think so. Let's discuss how we're introducing new developers to programming and whether we can make it more inclusive by removing the mathematics and replacing it with logic.
Culture
Carol Smith

* TIL There's a Microtonal Synth in My Browser!

Did you know there's a digital sound synthesizer in your browser? There is! It's called the Web Audio API and it's accessible from any JavaScript library or framework. I'll show you how I hacked Web Audio to make microtonal music in the browser.
Hacks
M Edward Borasky

* Understanding Your Organization With Code Archaeology

Come on an expedition into the dark corners of your project's code basement, deep in that directory everyone avoids because it's filled with spiders and booby traps and two mysterious old versions of JQuery from 2012 that no one even remembers using. Instead of getting exasperated by variables called data and poor command-query separation, learn to use code archaeology as a way to understand your organization better.
Practice
Liss McCabe

* Unionizing Tech: Everybody needs a union

The Open Source Movement has a few defining traits, such as the the do-it-yourself, stick-it-to-the-man scrappiness; the caring about the people around us and their experience with the software or workplace; and, the way it is forever adaptable to the needs of the situation. Open source and unions have a lot in common - lets get started unionizing open source shops!
Culture
Sam Scott

* Writing Inclusively about Technology Topics

Based on The Responsible Communication Style Guide, this workshop is an introduction to the concepts in the style guide. It also covers how a style guide can be an effective part of the workflow when creating and promoting technology projects (including open source).
Culture
Thursday Bram

* zulipbot: Solving GitHub workflow limitations and more

On a large open source project like Zulip, we were starting to see major productivity problems for the project, caused by longstanding limitations in GitHub’s permissions and notifications systems. Learn how we created zulipbot, an open source GitHub workflow bot written in Node.js, that patches these limitations in GitHub’s model and how you can use it to manage your own GitHub projects and organizations.
Practice
Joshua Pan

Favorite proposals for this user

* 100 Days of Creativity

People often claim you can't schedule creativity, or blithely claim anyone can learn to be creative, without actually consistently doing it themselves. In this talk, Aaron Parecki will describe how (and why) he decided to take on not one, but two 100-day projects: creating 100 pieces of music, as well as making 100 IndieWeb improvements for 100 days in a row. Aaron will show how he was able to stay focused, prioritize, as well as the challenges he encountered along the way.
Practice 2017-03-31 23:17:53 +0000
Aaron Parecki

* Be(come) a Mentor! Help Others Succeed!

There is always something new to learn in technology. We are always experts in one and beginners in another field. In order to learn successfully it’s important to have a mentor but it’s equally important to learn how to be a good mentor.
Practice 2017-03-22 11:07:03 +0000
Anna Ossowski

* Building Trust in Releases

Releasing an open source project is easy. Push code on Github and (optionally) release the package on PyPI, rubygems, or npm, and distribution packages. How do you build trust into releases so that your users can trust your product? If your product is critical to someone’s infrastructure, trust is even more critical.
Culture 2017-04-08 16:21:52 +0000
Nigel Babu

* De Falsis Deis: Social Contracts

Social engineering; it's a little more common and complicated than you might think. Wherever people live and work together, a social contract is formed. First theorized by Socrates and further expanded by Tom Hobbes, John Locke and Jean-Jacques Rousseau, this system is so fundamental most people take part in it unwittingly. Social hackers can use this to their advantage - and by breaking the social contract, we are all left vulnerable to attack. In this talk I will discuss how social contracts develop and how hackers use this natural human behavior against their targets.
Theory 2017-04-02 22:25:57 +0000
Tiberius Hefflin

* Here's Your Computer, Good Luck, Bye! Lessons Learned in Onboarding

Have you ever joined a team where they just turned you loose on day one and expected you to come up to speed on your own? How did that feel? In this presentation, we're going to look at onboarding from the perspective of a new hire. We'll go over what's worked and what hasn't worked for the teams I've been on. The specifics will be different for your teams, of course, but we'll discover some general principles together. By the end of the talk, you'll be coming up with your own ideas you can apply to your team's onboarding process. By making a few simple changes, you can improve morale, boost productivity, and keep your fellow engineers around longer.
Culture 2017-04-10 01:00:09 +0000
Ian Dees

* Magic, myth and the devops

Effective DevOps through collaboration and story telling.
Culture 2017-04-10 05:15:41 +0000
Jennifer Davis

* Never Accept the First Offer

We’ve all been at the negotiation table, whether we choose to participate or not. It’s easy to avoid this short lived discomfort, but doing so can cost the average person around $500,000 in lost income over the course of their lifetime. Making the decision to negotiate is the first step - this talk will help with the rest.
Theory 2017-04-02 22:23:38 +0000
Tiberius Hefflin

* No Coding Skills Required: How to Contribute to Open Source in Other Ways

You always wanted to contribute to Open Source but you don’t know how to code (yet)? Or maybe you can but you simply want to contribute in other ways? The goal of this talk is to explore how you can use your skills and contribute to Open Source in ways that don’t involve writing code.
Practice 2017-03-22 11:16:33 +0000
Anna Ossowski

* Non-programming ways to contribute to a FOSS project

Open Source world is really fascinating and almost everyone wants to join and contribute to FOSS. Though many of us may know one or more programming languages here and do coding but, there are many people, who love to contribute in open source ,but are non-coders.
Culture 2017-04-06 06:40:29 +0000
Amita Sharma

* Privacy, Security and Crayons - Security Concepts for Kids

Security and Privacy are difficult enough concepts for adults, trying to frame them for children and young adults can feel impossible. In this talk, I will look at security and privacy topics, ways to protect against them and some examples of how to best frame this information for a younger audience.
Culture 2017-04-02 22:16:33 +0000
Tiberius Hefflin

* Reproducible Builds: Trust Building through Best Practices

Reproducible builds introduces best practices enabling bit-by-bit identical software builds. With identical builds, independent verification becomes achievable by individual developers, who are then able to publicly share those verifications to the community at large.
Practice 2017-03-31 23:02:41 +0000
Vagrant Cascadian

* Running a Leaderless Community

PHPSP is a 8 year old community based on Sao Paulo, Brazil. Who leads this Community? Itself! How? Being a Community!
Activism 2017-04-10 03:00:55 +0000
Anderson Casimiro

* Security, Privacy, and Open Silicon

Threats to personal information security and privacy are proliferating at a rapid pace, as are countermeasures based on open hardware. This talk will review the open hardware information security landscape, from personal password managers and cloud devices to alternative processors that are open all the way down to the transistor level, with a focus on how open silicon is poised to change everything.
Activism 2017-03-31 23:44:24 +0000
Josh Lifton

* Starting Early – Open Source through Google Code-in

A talk about Google Code-in experience, the opportunities it provides for high school students, why we need more programs/contests like this, and the importance of mentorship to younger contributors.
Culture 2017-04-10 06:00:32 +0000
Joshua Pan

* Teaching Undergraduates how to contribute to Open Source

Surprisingly, most college students, even those enrolled in a CS program, don't really know what Open Source means. What does Open Source mean? What is the difference between each of the most popular Open Source licenses? What development tools and processes do you need to be familiar with to begin to contribute to an Open Source project? How do you evaluate an Open Source project to determine if it is the right one for you? How do you gain enough confidence to submit your first pull request to a live open source project?
Culture 2017-03-31 20:38:22 +0000
Chadd Williams

* The Death of Data: Retention, Rot, and Risk

I want to problematize keeping deprecated codebases around, and emphasize that mindless retention of data and code just increases our threat surfaces for attack and data corruption. Attackers in the future may be motivated by both ideology and money, and we are responsible for that.
Activism 2017-04-01 01:53:25 +0000
Heidi Waterhouse

* The Monster on the Project

Abusive behaviour can have profound effects on personal relationships but it can also make open source contributing and office life miserable. For those stuck in a team with co workers who exhibit toxic behavior, going to work every day can feel like going to a battlefield. Knowing how to identify and how to respond to unreasonable behavior is vital. In this talk we will look at the ways we can improve our office and FOSS communities by recognizing, managing and gracefully removing this toxic behavior.
Culture 2017-04-02 22:13:33 +0000
Tiberius Hefflin

* The Space Between Teams

It starts small--a manageable codebase, a tight-knit team, everyone headed the same direction. But with success comes growth, and soon it’s hard to keep track of all those teams. Problems emerge in the gaps between what one team provides and another expects. Let’s look at how New Relic has faced these growing pains.
Practice 2017-03-31 17:28:37 +0000
Jason Clark

* Voting-Method-Reform Activism

Activists around the world are experimenting with using voting to coordinate their decisions, and it's obvious that secure, open-source software must handle this form of communication. Yet typically such software is developed without involving "voting architects" who understand the math behind fair and unfair voting methods. Let's bridge this gap. Together we can build surveys and decentralized collaboration systems that bring democracy to very high levels of fairness, especially compared to the intentionally unfair use of single-mark ballots in governmental elections.
Activism 2017-03-13 06:20:31 +0000
Richard Fobes

* WebPush Notifications for Kinto

I'll first talk about what Kinto is, followed by a details of how webpush works. I'll wrap it up by explaining how webpush can be integrated into apps using simple http calls.
Theory 2017-03-24 11:55:15 +0000
Mansimar Kaur

* What is a Bug?: Imagination and Failure in Complex Systems

When working in complex systems, bugs become more than just one-line errors: they become stories and histories, manifestations of time and space. How do you deal with failure - not as an unanticipated event - but as a natural and expected outcome?
Practice 2017-03-26 02:46:10 +0000
Bonnie Eisenman

* Where Am I? Build Your Own Open-Source Geocoder!

At Hack Oregon, we often need to geocode or reverse-geocode - translate an address to latitude and longitude or vice versa. There are public APIs for this, but most of them have rate limits or intellectual property constraints that impact their usefulness. So we built our own, using the Census Bureau TIGER/Line® shapefiles, PostGIS Tiger geocoder, and Docker. I'll go through the process, from downloading the data and filtering to deploying the final image.
Practice 2017-04-01 00:18:41 +0000
M Edward Borasky

* You Suck at Remote Working

Everyone is a remote worker unless you speak to nobody outside your own 4 walls.
Practice 2017-04-05 17:36:31 +0000
Jeff Holt