Brandon Philips's favorites

Open Source Bridge 2012

Favorite sessions for this user

* A Crash Course in Tech Management

'Programmer' and 'Manager' are two different titles for a reason: they're two different jobs and skill sets. If you have managerial aspirations (or have had them foisted upon you), come to this session to learn some of the tricks of the managerial trade.
Business
VM Brasseur

* An Introduction to Luvit

Luvit is a new open source asynchronous framework. We will dive into what this project does, how it works, and what the goals are for the future.
Chemistry
Brandon Philips

* Building and Testing REST APIs in Node.js

Learn about techniques, libraries and patterns useful for building REST APIs using Node.js
Cooking
Russell Haering

* Dread Free Continuous Deployment Using Dreadnot

Learn how to use Dreadnot, an open source deployment orchestration tool creating using Node.js and Twitter Bootstrap, to integrate with a variety of integration and infrastructure tools to enable rolling deployments with the click of a button.
Cooking
Russell Haering

* How We Went Remote

Hiring remote workers is great for filling those holes on the team...but if you don't have the correct infrastructure in place you're just setting yourself--and your remote team members--up for a world of hurt. This session will detail how our engineering department went remote and thrived because of it.
Business
VM Brasseur

* Introduction to Linux Containers

This presentation will be of interest to system administrators and developers that want to provide isolated environments for production applications or test machines without the overhead of virtualization.
Cooking
Brian Martin

* Libuv: The Power Underneath Node.js

Learn about the magic that powers nodejs and has enabled other projects to do cross platform non blocking io goodness.
Chemistry
Brandon Philips

* The Bacomatic 5000: Migrating from Arduino/AVR to ARM Using Libmaple

Using open source hardware and software I will present migration paths from the Arduino to a more powerful architecture without significant cost increase or having to relearn everything.
Chemistry
Donald Davis

* Using XMonad for a No-Nonsense, Highly Productive Linux Desktop Experience

Many Linux desktop environments try to be easy to use for the average user, but that's not you. You're at your computer all day writing code; you don't want to mess around with *dragging windows* or (ugh) watching *animated transitions*. David Brewer will demonstrate how by using xmonad, a tiling window manager, you can free yourself from the tyranny of the mouse.
Cooking
David Brewer

* What Is My Kernel Doing?

Ever wonder what your kernel is doing? We instrumented kernels on both web servers and personal workstations, and then measured to see what they're doing.
Chemistry
Randy Appleton

* What We Talk About When We Talk About Project Management

We ask for a lot of things under the heading of 'project management'. This leads to pain and suffering when we are not clear for what we are asking for, or we're not set up to support what we're asking for. This is particularly special in open source companies and projects.
Business
Amye Scavarda

Open Source Bridge 2011

Favorite sessions for this user

* Composing Software Systems

If you can't reproduce your work reliably then you can't maintain it. You may get by for a while with ad-hoc build/release/deployment processes, but sooner or later they'll bite you. We'll present a new practical approach to assembling both software products and installed systems, drawing inspiration from sources including the functional programming community, commercial software projects, large IT deployments, and Linux distributions like Debian. Slides available at http://apters.com/osbridge2011.pdf
Cooking
Jamey Sharp, Josh Triplett

* Designing Error Aggregation Systems

So often we’re solely focused on the performance of our production systems. When disaster strikes, your team needs to know when error conditions begin, where they’re coming from, frequency, and an indication of the last time they occurred. Parsing logs isn’t fast enough, and email can’t keep up or preserve metadata.
Cooking
Gavin McQuillan

* How to Ask for Money

Have a project that just needs some cash to get off the ground? Need someone to fund beer and food for an event? Have a great idea and want to get paid for implementing it? Come find out how we did it.
Business
Selena Deckelmann, J Chris Anderson, Teyo Tyree

* Parrot: State of the VM

Parrot is an ambitious and long-lived project that aims to be a VM for interoperable dynamic language implementation. We'll take a look at what Parrot's developers have been doing of late, what kind of awesome goodies we've plundered from the OSS world and where we want to go in the next year.
Chemistry
Christoph Otto

* Run Your Javascript Everywhere, with Jellyfish.

In a world where Javascript is everywhere; your browser, server, database, mobile device -- you want and need code reuse to speed up development. In order to do this, you need to know that code works in all the environments you care about. Jellyfish is a node project focused on provisioning different environments and making it easy for you to execute your JS and get the results.
Cooking
Adam Christian

* The Big Data Exploratorium: Data Mining, from Patents to Memes

Learn to use simple natural language processing and graph analysis tools in Python and R to explore the structure of the dataverse. From Reddit to the USPTO to Google Books, come try some data hacks!
Cooking
Noah Pepper, Devin Chalmers

* The Open Cloud

Why be locked into a cloud vendor? Shouldn't Cloud be Open Cloud and powered by Open Source software? Open Stack is a collection of open source technologies to deliver a cloud operating system. Learn about Open Stack and how to use it to deliver your own Open Source powered clouds.
Cooking
James Turnbull, Eric Day

Open Source Bridge 2009

Favorite sessions for this user

* Bootstrapping Your Open Source Business

A panel on funding your business without VC, based on GitHub's experiences.
Business
Chris Wanstrath, PJ Hyett, Tom Werner

* Building an embedded Linux system monitoring device

As a Kernel developer I spend alot of my day looking at syslogs and rebooting systems. So, I set off to automate the process and you, the audience, will get an introduction to building ARM software and network device drivers.
Hacks
Brandon Philips

* Command-Line Kung Fu: White Belt

Come and learn some useful command-line short cuts and shell idioms that will make you vastly more productive in a Linux or Unix shell. Time permitting, we'll even play "stump the expert", so bring your thorniest shell problems.
Cooking
Hal Pomeranz

* Effective code sprinting

Code sprints are events where developers quickly complete coding tasks in a collaborative environment. A panel of skilled developers will share their experiences for organizing effective code sprints so you can better participate and organize your own. The panel members have organized and participated in over a hundred sprints (ranging from Django to JRuby) and used sprints as the primary way to develop community-oriented projects (e.g., Calagator). While most of the discussion will be about volunteer-run open source code sprints, many of the ideas will be readily applicable to improving development at your workplace. The panel will offer practical, actionable advice that you can use and answer your questions.
Culture
Igal Koshevoy, Reid Beels, Audrey Eschright

* Introduction to Parrot

This talk briefly explains the overall architecture of Parrot and teaches the skills needed to get started hacking in Parrot.
Hacks
Chromatic X

* Please Your Pixel-Hungry Eyes With Codes That Read Better

Make the text you see in the Terminal window more legible and readable by finding, customizing and designing your own font!
Hacks
Bram Pitoyo

* Write your own Bayesian Classifier: An Introduction to Machine Learning

Can you perform simple arithmetic? Do you know how to program well enough to open and read files? Then you can write a Bayesian classifier, one of the machine learning techniques for predicting categories, most famous for its use in spam filters. Let's demystify this impressively-named but ultimately simple process.
Cooking
John Melesky