Pat Allan's favorites

Favorite sessions for this user

* API Design Through the Lens of Photography

To be successful in photography and API design, you must first understand the constraints of the medium, both technical and non-technical. Learning how to work within constraints and finding your own style are critical to being a successful photographer and API designer.
Theory
Bryan Hughes

* Bots Not Cattle

"Cattle Not Pets" got us to the first generation of microservice infrastructures. Now it's time for a second generation metaphor: "Bots Not Cattle."
Theory
Josh Berkus

* Build your own spamtrap: How to make a spam IP blacklist in 45 minutes

I show how to use Postfix, PowerDNS, Spamassassin, and Python/Flask to trap spam sent to your whole organization (and why you would want such a thing).
Hacks
Andy Schmitt

* Cat Herding 101: Best Practices for Fostering an Engaged and Effective Online Community

Depending on what sector we come from, the words “community organizing/management” might invoke images of canvassing with flyers and clipboards or moderating online forums and high-fiving code contributors. Regardless, when we coordinate volunteers, email program participants, and chat with community members via social media, we are ultimately organizing and developing community. Whether your supporters are contributing content, volunteering, participating in forum discussions, or engaging on social media, you can play an important community management role.
Culture
Bethany Lister

* Creating a Third Wave of Free/Open Source Software

The free/open source software movement is over thirty years old, and has gone through a number of changes in that time, spawning projects large and small (including OpenConferenceWare, which runs this site!). If Free Software is the first generation, and Open Source is the second, current efforts toward creating an inclusive and sustainable world make up a third generation that we can start to form into a broader plan.
Culture
Audrey Eschright

* Exploring Mental Illness With Open Source

Julia Nguyen leads if me, an app to share mental health experiences with loved ones. In doing so, she has explored her insecurities with mental illness, learned how to engage diverse contributors, and developed better software practices with Ruby on Rails and JavaScript. She’ll share the lessons she has learned from transforming a passion project into an open source project. Inclusion takes on many forms in an open source project, including supporting contributors from all types of backgrounds, being empathetic to their project goals, and trusting them to take lead. As a mental health project, if me must also accommodate its contributors who face their own mental health challenges. All open source projects should do the same. Managing people is just as important as managing technical contributions in software.
Culture
Julia Nguyen

* Hogwarts is a Terrible Learning Environment: Discuss

Like many young Muggles of the early 00's, I dreamed of receiving my Hogwarts letter. But re-reading the series with an eye toward learning lessons about creating a positive learning environment, it's clear that Hogwarts School of Witchcraft and Wizardry contains some unfortunate lessons in what NOT to do. When it comes to crafting an environment that encourages asking questions, fosters cooperation, and ensuring the success of its developers -- I mean, wizards -- we can learn a lot from the mistakes of the Hogwarts faculty. In this magical talk, you'll learn how to be a better mentor and help your workplace become a place where your junior developers can flourish.
Culture
Lacey Williams Henschel

* More Than Binary: Inclusive Gender Collection and You

Many people identify their gender in many ways. So why do we build systems to capture accurate gender information with a dropdown that only lists “male” and “female”? This talk covers why you might want to consider alternative ways of selecting gender for your users, a brief overview of the current best practices, the case study of the decisions I made when creating my open source project Gender Amender (a library you can help work on right now!), and why more work needs to be done. I'd also like to facilitate a short discussion during the time slot, so that we can share varied perspectives on how to improve the entire process of gender collection, and articulate the lenses through which we can and should view gender (e.g. “what are some other data structures we could use to capture gender identity information?”).
Practice
Anne DeCusatis

* Overdoing Microservices: how small is too small?

All the cool kids are doing it, but is it possible to have too much of a good thing? I'll present some thoughts about things you can actually measure to decide if you've gone off the deep end with microservices.
Practice
Kevin Scaldeferri

* Supporting diversity with a new approach to software

It’s time for a new approach to software, one that embraces differences (not just tolerates them), and sees diversity as a strength. The industry is primed for change, and there are huge opportunities to do better by valuing emotion, intuition, compassion, purpose, empowerment, sustainability, and social justice. This highly-interactive session includes discussions of current “best practices” and emerging ideas from projects that have focused heavily on diversity, issues and problems in today’s environment, imagining how things could be different, and figuring out concrete steps to make it happen.
Theory
Jon Pincus, Tammarrian Rogers

* Taking no for an answer

Open source (like many fields) rewards people who are confident and even a bit pushy. So we give talks encouraging folk to get over imposter syndrome, lean in, say yes to more things. But self-improvement shouldn't focus only on our most vulnerable members, but also our most powerful. So let's talk not about saying yes, but about hearing no. Learning to take no for an answer can transform efforts such as security, diversity and mentoring where we have few experts or volunteers and great need. Let's talk about accepting "defeat" with grace, and how to take "no" for an answer while still moving forwards.
Culture
Terri Oda

* The Key Of Chaos

We built an open-hardware random number generator. We'll tell you all about it.
Theory
Bart Massey

* The Politics of Cooption in Open Source and Free Software

The Open Source and Free Software community is no longer simply a patchwork of hobbyist communities. Our change and growth brought many advantages, but some disadvantages too. We now operate in a microcosm not unlike the larger USA and international political climates. Hear the story of how it operates from an political insider.
Culture
Bradley Kuhn

* Tightly coupling your (REST) API docs

Documenting REST APIs isn't easy, and we need practical tips and tricks for keeping docs in sync with design and implementation. This talk explores some different but related ways to accomplish the goals of user-friendly, always up-to-date API docs.
Theory
Jennifer Rondeau

* Towards an Ethics of Care: Understanding and Acknowledging Care Work in Technology Companies

This talk explores dimensions of care work and best practices for acknowledging and understanding care work in technology teams, and makes the business case for considering all involved with building and maintaining technologies in strategy and planning. I explore ways in which to track the hidden costs of care work, and build a discourse of sustainability and inclusion around care work in technology companies.
Business
Amelia Abreu

* Turning Sensors into Signals: Humanizing IoT with Old Smartphones and the Web

People are already tired of the over-promise of IoT - the slew of marginally useful products, the overly confusing and crowded developer space, and endless examples of how to turn an LED on and off. Take a break, step back from the crowd, and come learn how to solve real human problems with that old phone that's collecting dust on your shelf.
Hacks
Rabimba Karanjai

* Unraveling the Masculinization of Technology

Have you ever wondered where the perception that technology is a masculine pursuit comes from? Or why we have to explain that, "no really, women are interested in computers too"?
Culture
Audrey Eschright

* Wiping Away the (Bad) Lines in the Sand in the Software Developer Community

Think of a shibboleth as a proverbial line in the sand that determines who belongs and who is an outsider. There are a lot of arbitrary shibboleths in programming. Text editors (emacs vs. vim vs. sublime), paradigms (object-oriented vs. functional), languages (everyone vs Java), type systems, are all topics of… to put it lightly, “vigorous conversation.” In set theory terms, the developer community does not do enough to encourage seeing different developer groups as unions instead of intersections. To a newcomer, this situation sets up too much of a danger of alienation. If someone makes fun of the language that you use to learn how to code, then you’re less likely to want to keep learning.
Culture
Walé Ogundipé

Favorite proposals for this user

* Devopracy: Infrastructure Code for Virtual Democracies

Devopracy is an open source project to build a disposable, portable cloud for civic engagement events and virtual democracies. We'll examine these use cases with consideration for security, maintainability, and code quality. There's a companion workshop on how to deploy the cloud and deploy an application onto it.
Theory 2016-04-21 06:21:42 +0000
Ele Mooney

* From Mobile First to Offline First

It's all too easy assume that your web or mobile app will run on a fast and reliable network with great coverage. The reality for your app's users, though, is often a slow and unreliable network with spotty coverage. What happens when the network doesn't work, or when the device is in airplane mode? You get unhappy, frustrated users. Building on the principles of mobile first, offline first is an approach to application design in which a web, mobile, desktop, or Internet of Things (IoT) application is built for offline usage first and is then progressively enhanced to take advantage of network connectivity when available.
Practice 2016-04-14 19:20:48 +0000
Bradley Holt

* Hackers & Hearthstone & Humanity

Sometimes the tech community can feel like it is without soul so Hackers & Hearthstone was created to focus on the cool things people are doing within the technology world.
Culture 2016-03-30 15:24:46 +0000
Lindsey Bieda

* Kafka for the Rubyist

Is your app flooded with incoming data, requiring ever growing herds of unicorns or pumas to keep up? Ever wished your background job queue was more resilient, or that you could choose to reprocess the queue after the fact?
Theory 2016-04-07 16:49:36 +0000
Jason Clark

* Made in the Machine: New Cultural Practices, Critical Analyses, and Techniques in Digital Fabrication, Making, and Manufacturing

I first knowingly witnessed the "Maker Movement" in 2010, heeded its siren call by joining the MIT Media Lab in 2011, and became disillusioned later that year. But I've been stubbornly making--and critiquing the notions of Making--ever since.
Culture 2016-04-11 00:20:51 +0000
Arlene Ducao

* Open Source: Power and the Passion

Open Source is one of the foundation pillars of our industry. You probably use the power of open source software every day: in the code you write, the tools you build with, the servers you deploy to. But perhaps it’s not quite the stable foundation we were hoping for? This talk will cover the various strengths and weaknesses of both open source and our reliance upon it, so we can trade in our assumptions for a greater awareness of the issues. Then together, we can find a path towards a more sustainable open source ecosystem.
Culture 2016-04-16 15:19:51 +0000
Pat Allan

* Stronger Than Fear: Mental Health in the Developer Community

Mental disorders are the largest contributor to disease burden in North America, but the developer community and those who employ us are afraid to face the problem head-on. In this talk, we'll examine the state of mental health awareness in the developer workplace, why most developers feel it isn't safe to talk about mental health, and what we can do to change the culture and save lives. Attendees will leave with 5 things they can do to make their workplace safer for those dealing with mental health disorders.
Culture 2016-03-26 03:07:30 +0000
Ed Finkler

* Transpreneur: Tales of a FTM Transgender Entrepreneur

The primary reason I was able to make career pivots at Intel was due to my connections to the Women at Intel network. Through this network I was referred to career counselors, business contacts, and the technical experts I needed to move my career ahead. As an FTM, my inbox is still filled with opportunities from women in tech groups, but now when I see these emails I wonder if I will be welcomed or not. A recent email I received said specifically "if you are female please attend." As a person who now identifies as male, I find that my connection to the community that supported me for the entirety of my career is now becoming tenuous.
Culture 2016-04-14 15:35:59 +0000
Sev Leonard

* When Harry Met Iannis 2016

Iannis Xenakis passed away on February 4, 2001. When he arrived in Heaven, he sought out his mentor, Olivier Messiaen. Messiaen said, “Iannis, there’s someone here I want you to meet.” The two walked over to a small sidewalk cafe, and there sat Harry Partch. And so from this fanciful meeting in Heaven, “When Harry Met Iannis” was born. Now I'm not a carpenter like Partch was, and I don't have access to conductors or orchestras like Xenakis did, so I'll have to synthesize instruments and performers. The software that makes this possible is an open-source language called ChucK. I'll talk a bit about the Partch music theory, Xenakis' use of game theory and the ChucK language. But mostly, this talk is about the music and not the tools that made it. And you'll be the first to hear "When Harry Met Iannis 2016" in its entirety.
Practice 2016-03-15 03:35:20 +0000
M. Edward (Ed) Borasky