Tim Chevalier's favorites

Favorite sessions for this user

* Accessible By Default

Making your website accessible for users with disabilities isn’t flashy, but it’s necessary. Websites built for universal access benefit all users, not just users with a disability. They’re also more SEO friendly, and are generally built to be more user friendly. From generating increased revenue, to providing better access to services, the benefits of developing accessible websites are real and measurable.
Practice
Kendra Skeene

* Accidental Developer Evangelism

Learn how to organize community events and share your ideas with the open-source community AFK!
Culture
Katherine Fellows

* Behind Closed Doors: Managing Passwords in a Dangerous World

A modern application has a lot of passwords and keys floating around. Encryption keys, database passwords, and API credentials; often typed in to text files and forgotten. Fortunately a new wave of tools are emerging to help manage, update, and audit these secrets. Come learn how to avoid being the next TechCrunch headline.
Practice
Noah Kantrowitz

* Cat Herding 101: Best Practices for Fostering an Engaged and Effective Online Community

Depending on what sector we come from, the words “community organizing/management” might invoke images of canvassing with flyers and clipboards or moderating online forums and high-fiving code contributors. Regardless, when we coordinate volunteers, email program participants, and chat with community members via social media, we are ultimately organizing and developing community. Whether your supporters are contributing content, volunteering, participating in forum discussions, or engaging on social media, you can play an important community management role.
Culture
Bethany Lister

* Exit Condition: when to ragequit, raise hell, or duck and cover

If you're caught in a job or a project where you simply can't convince your colleagues or organization to treat you with respect, it often feels like you're in a maze with no clear way out. (Un)fortunately, you're not alone. There's no universal solution to navigating a toxic or abusive workplace, but there's power in finding a theoretical context, sharing our stories, and learning from each other. Come learn about the options of voice, loyalty, and exit, and hear the stories of others who have had to make hard choices.
Culture
Frances Hocutt

* Exploring Mental Illness With Open Source

Julia Nguyen leads if me, an app to share mental health experiences with loved ones. In doing so, she has explored her insecurities with mental illness, learned how to engage diverse contributors, and developed better software practices with Ruby on Rails and JavaScript. She’ll share the lessons she has learned from transforming a passion project into an open source project. Inclusion takes on many forms in an open source project, including supporting contributors from all types of backgrounds, being empathetic to their project goals, and trusting them to take lead. As a mental health project, if me must also accommodate its contributors who face their own mental health challenges. All open source projects should do the same. Managing people is just as important as managing technical contributions in software.
Culture
Julia Nguyen

* Free Culture in an Expensive World

Money is a common worry, inside the open source community and out, but we often feel uncomfortable discussing it. We’ll talk about why that is and how our social norms around money impact who participates in open source and how they do so. The heart of this talk will be a series of case studies based on interviews with community members covering various economic models for open source, including worker co-ops, grant-funded and academic projects, for-profit business models, crowdfunding campaigns, and all-volunteer projects. We’ll explore the sustainability of each model as well as how they deal with the social pressures outlined in the first part of the talk.
Business
Shauna Gordon-McKeon

* Free Everything: Hacking Content Liberation

Large commercial websites rely on the "network effect" to keep users from exploring alternatives. Putting contributions under an open license can break this effect. This talk will explore hacks to give users control over the content they contribute to commercial websites.
Hacks
Erik Moeller

* Hard Problems in Terms of Service Enforcement

When you run an online service, you always hope you won't have to deal with abuse. But it's inevitable, and many situations aren't clear-cut as you might wish. Some examples of abuse are obvious, but this talk explores the grey areas and messy questions: what content should you consider a violation of your Terms of Service, and how do you handle it when it's reported to you?
Culture
Denise Paolucci

* Inside Websockets

Protocol design is about tradeoffs, and if you pick the wrong tradeoff, you may regret it for a very long time. Any time you have one part of a program talk to another part of a program, you have a protocol. In this talk, we'll dig into the details of how WebSockets work and what decisions the designers made.
Theory
Leah Hanson

* Less Painful Legacy Code Replacement

Replacing legacy code is a challenge on every front, from managing stakeholder expectations to tackling the technical work. Thoughtful preparation and a pocket full of tools can make the experience a little less painful.
Practice
Jennifer Tu

* Little Leaks Sink Your Tests

"The tests pass on my machine." "Wait, it was working a minute ago." "Oh, that test is flaky sometimes." Unpredictable tests are toxic for our productivity. They undermine confidence in our code. They encourage us to wallpaper over the immediate problem, rather than fixing the underlying cause. In this presentation, we'll talk about a chief cause of flaky tests: leaky global state.
Practice
Ian Dees

* Rethinking Social Media, Privacy, and Information Flow from the Ground Up

Inspired by security and privacy research in operating systems, we'll be discussing possible ways to redesign privacy models so that all users can have fine-grained control over both visibility of their content and how others can interact with it.
Theory
Clarissa Littler

* Sustainable Career Development: Advancing While Still Having Free Time

In this talk, we'll examine the pressure in the tech industry to participate in work-related extracurriculars like side projects and meetups. We'll analyze where these expectations come from, what they're actually getting at, and talk about ideas for progressing in our careers without losing sight of the things in life that make us happy outside of work.
Culture
Noelle Daley

* The Ability to Disable: Who Did You Forget When You Designed Your UI?

While the increased use of technology has in some ways improved the lives of those with disabilities, there is a gap that still needs to be filled. Uncaptioned or poorly captioned videos leave the deaf and hard of hearing community out of the loop, untagged photos leave blind users unaware of integral information, and poorly coded webpages are too much of a hassle for individuals using screen readers. But what if this was this was different? What if we thought about all of the potential users of our technology and developed programs intentionally allowing access for everyone? How could we make a programmer’s work truly inclusive, truly open to everyone? Experiential learning often provides those ‘a ha!’ moments, so together we’ll enjoy some mis-captioned videos, have a ‘listen-along’ to what a screen reader sounds like when a page is not coded correctly, and take a look at the end users’ experience when software is not programmed with a disabled audience in mind. Then, we’ll talk about what we can do to improve the current offerings and answer, “what next?”
Culture
Rebecca Jennings

* The Folk Knowledge of Bugzilla

It's good to know if a bug is a regression, and if I want to mark a bug as a regression, there's a keyword for that. (searches on regression keyword.) But there's also a whiteboard tag for that (searches on whiteboard tags containing 'regression'.) Oh dear, and let me unique that out and there's how many ways to say "this is a regression." If you're a release manager, how do you find out what bugs may be regressions and that you want to follow up on with your engineering leads?
Practice
Emma Humphries

* The Politics of Cooption in Open Source and Free Software

The Open Source and Free Software community is no longer simply a patchwork of hobbyist communities. Our change and growth brought many advantages, but some disadvantages too. We now operate in a microcosm not unlike the larger USA and international political climates. Hear the story of how it operates from an political insider.
Culture
Bradley Kuhn

* Towards an Ethics of Care: Understanding and Acknowledging Care Work in Technology Companies

This talk explores dimensions of care work and best practices for acknowledging and understanding care work in technology teams, and makes the business case for considering all involved with building and maintaining technologies in strategy and planning. I explore ways in which to track the hidden costs of care work, and build a discourse of sustainability and inclusion around care work in technology companies.
Business
Amelia Abreu

* Type Theory 101

Have you heard about type theory and always wanted to understand the principles behind it, but always thought it was too complicated since it has a lot of Lambda Calculus and algebras? This talk will approach these concepts in a friendly way.
Theory
Hanneli Tavante

* Unikernels and Containers: How to Even

Let's talk about what containers and unikernels -- two oft-compared technologies -- even are, how they work, and what problems they solve.
Practice
Mindy Preston

* Unraveling the Masculinization of Technology

Have you ever wondered where the perception that technology is a masculine pursuit comes from? Or why we have to explain that, "no really, women are interested in computers too"?
Culture
Audrey Eschright

* Yelling As A Service: Adventures in Unofficial QA

What goes into making a helpful bug report, if you're not even given access to the repository? Why should you, the user, report bugs? How do you navigate a series of gatekeepers who don't want to acknowledge your bugs? How do you maintain a good relationship with people in charge of a project that's screwing up your whole life?
Practice
Azure Lunatic

Favorite proposals for this user

* Civic hacking 201: Successful techniques for civic tech

There is a secret recipe for successful civic hacking. As a Code for America brigade captain for over three years, organizer of numerous civic tech events and hackathons, and authoring a book about open source, open government, and open data, I have a tremendous amount of knowledge to share about civic hacking.
Culture 2016-03-18 22:16:37 +0000
Jason Hibbets

* Debugging Diversity

Despite the media attention given to the diversity in tech problem, many technology practitioners don't see how a lack of diversity affects their daily life. So, it is not surprising that they neither understand the magnitude of the problem nor how they can fix it. However, the principles and language of debugging, something technology practitioners understand well, can be used to help them understand diversity and their role in solving the problem. So, technologists already have a set of terms that they can use to tackle diversity. They just need to know how to apply those terms in order to effect positive change. These terms are expected behavior, tracing, refactoring, and sample code.
Culture 2016-03-16 19:25:11 +0000
Anjuan Simmons

* Diving into distributed microservices architecture with Kubernetes on AWS and GCE

When designing a reliable solution with lots of moving parts, it's important to look not just into code but in-between code - more at the integration parts of the overall system. In this intense talk you will learn about the variety of real-world important aspects to take into account architecting a flexible microservices based solution. Some of the valuable aspects are environment choices, infrastructure planning, preparation and automation, separation of solution parts into independently deployable services, service discovery, replication, resiliency and many more. You will explore into the practical architecture of Kubernetes, see how to create and configure Kubernetes cluster on AWS and GCE, create and prepare containerized services to be deployed into the cluster.
Practice 2016-04-19 18:25:34 +0000
Alena Hall

* Hackers & Hearthstone & Humanity

Sometimes the tech community can feel like it is without soul so Hackers & Hearthstone was created to focus on the cool things people are doing within the technology world.
Culture 2016-03-30 15:24:46 +0000
Lindsey Bieda

* How To Be A Great Developer

Being a great developer is much more than technical know-how. Empathy, communication, and reason are at least as important, but are undervalued in our industry. We'll examine the impact these skills can have and how to apply them to our work.
Culture 2016-03-26 03:14:34 +0000
Ed Finkler

* In the Trenches of Open Source Culture: The Node.js Inclusivity Working Group

The goal of this working group strikes deep at the heart of problems in open source software. We hear the stories of contentious and dramatic flare-ups, but not the day to day work people do to make things better. Come learn what it's like and what it takes to make a difference in OSS culture.
Culture 2016-04-16 02:04:52 +0000
Bryan Hughes

* Introduction to high performance computing and parallel filesystems

This talk will discuss High Performance Computing and Lustre - an open source parallel file system. We'll discuss scaling challenges and how open source software is being developed to address them.
Theory 2016-04-21 02:57:34 +0000
Meghan McClelland

* Stronger Than Fear: Mental Health in the Developer Community

Mental disorders are the largest contributor to disease burden in North America, but the developer community and those who employ us are afraid to face the problem head-on. In this talk, we'll examine the state of mental health awareness in the developer workplace, why most developers feel it isn't safe to talk about mental health, and what we can do to change the culture and save lives. Attendees will leave with 5 things they can do to make their workplace safer for those dealing with mental health disorders.
Culture 2016-03-26 03:07:30 +0000
Ed Finkler

* Technical writing as public service: working on open source in government

What if U.S. federal agencies decided to reuse and contribute to open source software projects built by other agencies, since agencies often have similar technology problems to solve? And what if they hired technical writers with open source community experience to write documentation for these projects? That would be pretty cool. Also, that’s my work. I'm part of 18F, a digital services consulting team within and for the federal government, and all of our work is open source.
Practice 2016-04-06 00:21:15 +0000
Britta Gustafson