Bracken Mosbacker's favorites

Favorite sessions for this user

* Accessible By Default

Making your website accessible for users with disabilities isn’t flashy, but it’s necessary. Websites built for universal access benefit all users, not just users with a disability. They’re also more SEO friendly, and are generally built to be more user friendly. From generating increased revenue, to providing better access to services, the benefits of developing accessible websites are real and measurable.
Practice
Kendra Skeene

* API Design Through the Lens of Photography

To be successful in photography and API design, you must first understand the constraints of the medium, both technical and non-technical. Learning how to work within constraints and finding your own style are critical to being a successful photographer and API designer.
Theory
Bryan Hughes

* Behind Closed Doors: Managing Passwords in a Dangerous World

A modern application has a lot of passwords and keys floating around. Encryption keys, database passwords, and API credentials; often typed in to text files and forgotten. Fortunately a new wave of tools are emerging to help manage, update, and audit these secrets. Come learn how to avoid being the next TechCrunch headline.
Practice
Noah Kantrowitz

* Bots Not Cattle

"Cattle Not Pets" got us to the first generation of microservice infrastructures. Now it's time for a second generation metaphor: "Bots Not Cattle."
Theory
Josh Berkus

* Brooks Law & Open Source: Is Community-Driven Software Doomed?

One measure of health in open source projects is a growing contributor community. In 1975, Fred Brooks published The Mythical Man-Month, in which he noted that adding manpower to projects slows the release of software. If Brooks’ Law holds true, are growing open source projects doomed to fail? Or can we reconcile the ideas that more contributors are both beneficial and detrimental?
Culture
Jason Yee

* Corporate Open Source Fail

What makes companies with good intentions fail so miserably at open source? How can we (as engineers and managers) influence our bosses to "do the right thing"?
Business
Sarah Sharp

* Creating a Third Wave of Free/Open Source Software

The free/open source software movement is over thirty years old, and has gone through a number of changes in that time, spawning projects large and small (including OpenConferenceWare, which runs this site!). If Free Software is the first generation, and Open Source is the second, current efforts toward creating an inclusive and sustainable world make up a third generation that we can start to form into a broader plan.
Culture
Audrey Eschright

* Deployment as a Feature

Too often the deployment of software is treated as a necessary evil. When you design your deployments as a feature of your system, the productivity gains will surprise you.
Theory
Carl Hall

* Documentaries, Accessibility, and Open Culture

I've been making a documentary film about accessibility for almost a year now. What I've realized is that film is fundamentally hard to access. Let's talk about what that means for culture, creators, and consumers.
Culture
Chris Higgins

* Dodge Disasters and March to Triumph as a Mentor

Good engineers write good code, but the best engineers raise the skills of their junior colleagues, too. If you're a senior engineer, you must learn to mentor new hires. Besides, great mentors are critical to the careers of women and minorities in tech. I have failed at mentoring, then succeeded. Learn from me and march to mentorship triumph.
Culture
A. Jesse Jiryu Davis

* Free Everything: Hacking Content Liberation

Large commercial websites rely on the "network effect" to keep users from exploring alternatives. Putting contributions under an open license can break this effect. This talk will explore hacks to give users control over the content they contribute to commercial websites.
Hacks
Erik Moeller

* Hogwarts is a Terrible Learning Environment: Discuss

Like many young Muggles of the early 00's, I dreamed of receiving my Hogwarts letter. But re-reading the series with an eye toward learning lessons about creating a positive learning environment, it's clear that Hogwarts School of Witchcraft and Wizardry contains some unfortunate lessons in what NOT to do. When it comes to crafting an environment that encourages asking questions, fosters cooperation, and ensuring the success of its developers -- I mean, wizards -- we can learn a lot from the mistakes of the Hogwarts faculty. In this magical talk, you'll learn how to be a better mentor and help your workplace become a place where your junior developers can flourish.
Culture
Lacey Williams Henschel

* HTTP/2 and Asynchronous APIs

HTTP/2 (H2) is coming, and along with it a whole new way of communicating over the web. Connection re-use, prioritization, multiplexing, and server push are just some of the features in H2.
Theory
Davey Shafik

* Inside Websockets

Protocol design is about tradeoffs, and if you pick the wrong tradeoff, you may regret it for a very long time. Any time you have one part of a program talk to another part of a program, you have a protocol. In this talk, we'll dig into the details of how WebSockets work and what decisions the designers made.
Theory
Leah Hanson

* Micro-services provide some benefits, but at what cost?

Several years ago, there was an architectural paradigm shift toward "micro-services" and away from the "monolithic" application stack. A micro-service architecture comes with scalability and replaceability, among others, but is it worth the time and effort to build it? Is it worth debugging API calls gone wrong? If you're thinking about making this move, have already started, or have already deployed to production, this is an ideal venue to see what others are doing with micro-services.
Theory
Serge Domkowski

* Monitoring Asynchronous Applications

The lure of asynchronous programming is that it will make your application run faster and your code simpler to reason about. So we have our wonderfully efficient non-blocking app; how do we check that it's delivering the goods performance wise?
Practice
Amy Boyle

* Monoids, and Sketches, and CRDTs, oh my!

A (hopefully) accessible introduction to some of the key mathematical concepts that make distributed and streaming computation possible.
Theory
Kevin Scaldeferri

* More Than Binary: Inclusive Gender Collection and You

Many people identify their gender in many ways. So why do we build systems to capture accurate gender information with a dropdown that only lists “male” and “female”? This talk covers why you might want to consider alternative ways of selecting gender for your users, a brief overview of the current best practices, the case study of the decisions I made when creating my open source project Gender Amender (a library you can help work on right now!), and why more work needs to be done. I'd also like to facilitate a short discussion during the time slot, so that we can share varied perspectives on how to improve the entire process of gender collection, and articulate the lenses through which we can and should view gender (e.g. “what are some other data structures we could use to capture gender identity information?”).
Practice
Anne DeCusatis

* Open Source is Key for Innovating Pedagogy and Curricula

This talk will discuss how a closed loop in education—across all grade levels and disciplines—contributes to the stagnation of a profession and how an open source approach and platform is necessary to break the inward cycle of our current pedagogy. It will also show examples of collaboration in the creation of curricula leading to the generation of new, innovative pedagogy and review current methods for educators to open source and call for new methods and platforms to aid educators.
Culture
Gary Rozanc

* Overdoing Microservices: how small is too small?

All the cool kids are doing it, but is it possible to have too much of a good thing? I'll present some thoughts about things you can actually measure to decide if you've gone off the deep end with microservices.
Practice
Kevin Scaldeferri

* Security Starts With You: Social Engineering

Virus? There’s an app for that. Malware? There’s an app for that. Social engineering? It's a little more complicated. These techniques, used by hackers to gather information on their target, are hard to combat without education - so why don’t we talk about them more often? Aimed at the average user who could be targeted by such an attack, this talk discusses the tools of social engineering, how it can be combated and why so many companies fail in preparing their employees for such an attack.
Theory
Tiberius Hefflin

* Standardizing the Social Web - W3C #socialweb specs

The W3C Social Web Working Group has been developing standards to make it easier to build social applications in the open web. In this talk, you'll get an overview of the various specifications in development, (Activity Streams 2, Webmention, Micropub, and ActivityPub), to help you learn how each applies to the social web.
Theory
Aaron Parecki

* Supporting diversity with a new approach to software

It’s time for a new approach to software, one that embraces differences (not just tolerates them), and sees diversity as a strength. The industry is primed for change, and there are huge opportunities to do better by valuing emotion, intuition, compassion, purpose, empowerment, sustainability, and social justice. This highly-interactive session includes discussions of current “best practices” and emerging ideas from projects that have focused heavily on diversity, issues and problems in today’s environment, imagining how things could be different, and figuring out concrete steps to make it happen.
Theory
Jon Pincus, Tammarrian Rogers

* Sustainable Career Development: Advancing While Still Having Free Time

In this talk, we'll examine the pressure in the tech industry to participate in work-related extracurriculars like side projects and meetups. We'll analyze where these expectations come from, what they're actually getting at, and talk about ideas for progressing in our careers without losing sight of the things in life that make us happy outside of work.
Culture
Noelle Daley

* The Ability to Disable: Who Did You Forget When You Designed Your UI?

While the increased use of technology has in some ways improved the lives of those with disabilities, there is a gap that still needs to be filled. Uncaptioned or poorly captioned videos leave the deaf and hard of hearing community out of the loop, untagged photos leave blind users unaware of integral information, and poorly coded webpages are too much of a hassle for individuals using screen readers. But what if this was this was different? What if we thought about all of the potential users of our technology and developed programs intentionally allowing access for everyone? How could we make a programmer’s work truly inclusive, truly open to everyone? Experiential learning often provides those ‘a ha!’ moments, so together we’ll enjoy some mis-captioned videos, have a ‘listen-along’ to what a screen reader sounds like when a page is not coded correctly, and take a look at the end users’ experience when software is not programmed with a disabled audience in mind. Then, we’ll talk about what we can do to improve the current offerings and answer, “what next?”
Culture
Rebecca Jennings

* Tightly coupling your (REST) API docs

Documenting REST APIs isn't easy, and we need practical tips and tricks for keeping docs in sync with design and implementation. This talk explores some different but related ways to accomplish the goals of user-friendly, always up-to-date API docs.
Theory
Jennifer Rondeau

* Towards an Ethics of Care: Understanding and Acknowledging Care Work in Technology Companies

This talk explores dimensions of care work and best practices for acknowledging and understanding care work in technology teams, and makes the business case for considering all involved with building and maintaining technologies in strategy and planning. I explore ways in which to track the hidden costs of care work, and build a discourse of sustainability and inclusion around care work in technology companies.
Business
Amelia Abreu

* Type Theory 101

Have you heard about type theory and always wanted to understand the principles behind it, but always thought it was too complicated since it has a lot of Lambda Calculus and algebras? This talk will approach these concepts in a friendly way.
Theory
Hanneli Tavante

* Unraveling the Masculinization of Technology

Have you ever wondered where the perception that technology is a masculine pursuit comes from? Or why we have to explain that, "no really, women are interested in computers too"?
Culture
Audrey Eschright

* What Hath Von Neumann Wrought? Programming before programming languages

We program today in a rich environment, but that wasn't always the case. We celebrate the pioneers of programming languages: Grace Hopper (COBOL), John Backus (FORTRAN), John McCarthy (LISP), Kenneth Iverson (APL) and Peter Naur (ALGOL). But there was a time before programming languages. How did people program back then? I'll show you!
Theory
M. Edward (Ed) Borasky

* Why you can't afford to miss out on junior developers

What if your next hire could make your team faster, help create a more inclusive and diverse environment, be easy to find, and be super excited to work with you? These people are not unicorns, they're junior developers. Most teams just don't know how to bring them on and get these benefits. Whether you're in a startup, consultancy, or a BigCo, with a few tips and processes, any team can learn how to grow new developers.
Practice
Bracken Mosbacker

* Wiping Away the (Bad) Lines in the Sand in the Software Developer Community

Think of a shibboleth as a proverbial line in the sand that determines who belongs and who is an outsider. There are a lot of arbitrary shibboleths in programming. Text editors (emacs vs. vim vs. sublime), paradigms (object-oriented vs. functional), languages (everyone vs Java), type systems, are all topics of… to put it lightly, “vigorous conversation.” In set theory terms, the developer community does not do enough to encourage seeing different developer groups as unions instead of intersections. To a newcomer, this situation sets up too much of a danger of alienation. If someone makes fun of the language that you use to learn how to code, then you’re less likely to want to keep learning.
Culture
Wale O.

Favorite proposals for this user

* Debugging Diversity

Despite the media attention given to the diversity in tech problem, many technology practitioners don't see how a lack of diversity affects their daily life. So, it is not surprising that they neither understand the magnitude of the problem nor how they can fix it. However, the principles and language of debugging, something technology practitioners understand well, can be used to help them understand diversity and their role in solving the problem. So, technologists already have a set of terms that they can use to tackle diversity. They just need to know how to apply those terms in order to effect positive change. These terms are expected behavior, tracing, refactoring, and sample code.
Culture 2016-03-16 19:25:11 +0000
Anjuan Simmons

* Even Cowboy Coders Get the Site Reliability Blues

The principles behind building reliable distributed systems and gracefully managing changes in them turn out to look a lot like the principles behind building psychologically safe communities. In this talk, I'll explain some of the basic principles behind site reliability engineering and how they relate to feminist and social justice ideas. This talk assumes no prior knowledge of site reliability engineering.
Culture 2016-04-19 22:32:28 +0000
Tim Chevalier

* Exploring Privilege in Open Source Communities

In many open source communities, privilege is rarely discussed. While it is not an easy topic to talk about, it is an important subject to explore if we want to make sure open source is truly open to everyone. After exploring sources of privilege and learning strategies to deal with it, we can all be better equipped to take action to improve our open source communities for the long run.
Culture 2016-04-12 16:46:20 +0000
Taylor Barnett

* Opensource.com Lightning Talks

Opensource.com is excited to host a lightning-fast hour at Open Source Bridge.
Practice 2016-04-06 21:13:03 +0000
Jason Hibbets

* What Shipping Containers Can Teach Us About Digital Content Standards

Global trade wouldn’t be as efficient without the invention - and standardization - of shipping containers. Standardized containers have globalized our economy across the shipping industry in a way that wouldn’t have been possible otherwise. What can this earlier standardization effort teach us about the tools and systems we’re building today? What are the struggles of our digital age? How are the struggles of shipping goods in 1950s similar to our content struggles now - and how can we move forward?
Theory 2016-04-11 18:07:00 +0000
Kendra Skeene, Nikhil Deshpande