Taylor Barnett's favorites

Favorite sessions for this user

* Accidental Developer Evangelism

Learn how to organize community events and share your ideas with the open-source community AFK!
Culture
Katherine Fellows

* Corporate Open Source Fail

What makes companies with good intentions fail so miserably at open source? How can we (as engineers and managers) influence our bosses to "do the right thing"?
Business
Sarah Sharp

* Dodge Disasters and March to Triumph as a Mentor

Good engineers write good code, but the best engineers raise the skills of their junior colleagues, too. If you're a senior engineer, you must learn to mentor new hires. Besides, great mentors are critical to the careers of women and minorities in tech. I have failed at mentoring, then succeeded. Learn from me and march to mentorship triumph.
Culture
A. Jesse Jiryu Davis

* Exploring Mental Illness With Open Source

Julia Nguyen leads if me, an app to share mental health experiences with loved ones. In doing so, she has explored her insecurities with mental illness, learned how to engage diverse contributors, and developed better software practices with Ruby on Rails and JavaScript. She’ll share the lessons she has learned from transforming a passion project into an open source project. Inclusion takes on many forms in an open source project, including supporting contributors from all types of backgrounds, being empathetic to their project goals, and trusting them to take lead. As a mental health project, if me must also accommodate its contributors who face their own mental health challenges. All open source projects should do the same. Managing people is just as important as managing technical contributions in software.
Culture
Julia Nguyen

* Hogwarts is a Terrible Learning Environment: Discuss

Like many young Muggles of the early 00's, I dreamed of receiving my Hogwarts letter. But re-reading the series with an eye toward learning lessons about creating a positive learning environment, it's clear that Hogwarts School of Witchcraft and Wizardry contains some unfortunate lessons in what NOT to do. When it comes to crafting an environment that encourages asking questions, fosters cooperation, and ensuring the success of its developers -- I mean, wizards -- we can learn a lot from the mistakes of the Hogwarts faculty. In this magical talk, you'll learn how to be a better mentor and help your workplace become a place where your junior developers can flourish.
Culture
Lacey Williams Henschel

* Supporting your Support: Give your Support Team Flowers, Chocolate, Money, and Stock Options

How to support your support team 1. Pay your support staff a living wage. There are many reasons why you should pay your support staff a living wage, including reduced stress and higher quality work. We don’t expect support staff to be paid on par with engineering, but they should receive the same benefits & perks as engineers. 2. Listen to your support team. Your support team has valuable, data-backed insights about your customers’ pain points. Prioritize support needs in terms of product improvements. 3. Support your colleagues’ career ambitions. Some people who work in support are interested in becoming engineers. You can encourage this by giving them time to learn coding or work on projects during work hours, or paying for educational materials or tech conferences. Respect the fact that not everyone wants to be an engineer as well. Support should be a viable career path in its own right.
Business
Kiera Manion-Fischer, Stephanie Snopek

Favorite proposals for this user

* Don't Get Scared, Get Started

Contributing to open source is rewarding in terms of the satisfactions you get while you help the open source community to grow as well as the new things that you get to learn. If you go on discussing about contributing to open source most of them find it intimidating. Most of them are scared of contributing to open source projects. Most of them think that it is too tough to get in, too tough to get started and they won’t be able to do it. There are a lot of myths about the difficulty level of getting started with contributing to open source. With this talk I would like to break the myths and tell the truths around them.
Culture 2016-04-20 06:24:13 +0000
Tapasweni Pathak

* Hackers & Hearthstone & Humanity

Sometimes the tech community can feel like it is without soul so Hackers & Hearthstone was created to focus on the cool things people are doing within the technology world.
Culture 2016-03-30 15:24:46 +0000
Lindsey Bieda

* In the Trenches of Open Source Culture: The Node.js Inclusivity Working Group

The goal of this working group strikes deep at the heart of problems in open source software. We hear the stories of contentious and dramatic flare-ups, but not the day to day work people do to make things better. Come learn what it's like and what it takes to make a difference in OSS culture.
Culture 2016-04-16 02:04:52 +0000
Bryan Hughes

* Stronger Than Fear: Mental Health in the Developer Community

Mental disorders are the largest contributor to disease burden in North America, but the developer community and those who employ us are afraid to face the problem head-on. In this talk, we'll examine the state of mental health awareness in the developer workplace, why most developers feel it isn't safe to talk about mental health, and what we can do to change the culture and save lives. Attendees will leave with 5 things they can do to make their workplace safer for those dealing with mental health disorders.
Culture 2016-03-26 03:07:30 +0000
Ed Finkler