Bhaskar Athmanathan's favorites

Favorite sessions for this user

* A programmers guide to Music.

Imagine a place where Ruby meets Music, its called MAGIC LAND. Music is not a lot different from programming. In this talk we will see how. I will talk about this amazing piece of open-source software called SonicPi. SonicPi is a new kind of musical instrument. Think about it, you write code to make music. And it gets even better, code is written in a ruby DSL. Also I will talk about notes, samples, synth and other musical things SonicPi lets us do it. Don't worry if do not get these terms. When I started, I did not either. But at the end of the talk, you will know how to make music.
Culture
Rishi Jain

* An Introduction to ClojureScript

ClojureScript is a fun, productive language that compiles to JavaScript. Though its syntax is a different its functional immutable nature lets you be productive when developing complex web applications.
Theory
Julio Barros

* An Introduction to OpenSCAD using Legos

Learn 3D modelling with OpenSCAD through an hands-on tutorial for modelling Legos
Practice
Bhaskar Athmanathan

* Cassandra - an introduction

Built mostly in Java, Cassandra is a powerful open source NoSQL database, based on the model of a partitioned row store. This talk will provide general use cases for Cassandra, explain Cassandra’s architecture and its benefits, feature tools for accessing and administering Cassandra, and demonstrate how to integrate Cassandra with existing Java applications.
Practice
Hanneli Tavante

* Digging through the logs

Okay, so now it's time for the really fun part: We've removed the duplicate rows from the log, now we need to only show the rows that contain something that *looks like* an IP address. To do this we'll use a search pattern. These patterns are written in Regular Expressions or RegEx. Like so many other tools in Linux they're immensely powerful but either don't work at all or go haywire with a single incorrect character. Let's write one that looks for a cluster of numbers, then a period, then another cluster of numbers.
Practice
Toby Fee

* Finding funding for an open source based business

Ever had an open source project and wanted to figure out how to get funding for it? In this talk we'll discuss different funding methods, what angel's look for in open source companies, and potential funding options in Portland.
Business
Meghan McClelland

* Free Everything: Hacking Content Liberation

Large commercial websites rely on the "network effect" to keep users from exploring alternatives. Putting contributions under an open license can break this effect. This talk will explore hacks to give users control over the content they contribute to commercial websites.
Hacks
Erik Moeller

* Graph Databases WIll Change Your Freakin Life

Most developer have worked with relational DBs like MySQL or PostgreSQL, but for many use cases they aren't the best option. Graph databases have a simpler, more powerful model for handling complex related data. In this talk we'll work with Neo4j to explore the advantages of graph DBs. Attendees will learn the graph model, how graph DBs let you do things that are practically impossible with SQL, and the best options for integrating one into your application -- new or existing.
Practice
Ed Finkler

* Hardware Hula Hoops and Flow

In psychology flow is the honed in energized focus you get when performing tasks that are challenging that can be experienced in hula hooping and programming.
Hacks
Lindsey Bieda

* Inside Websockets

Protocol design is about tradeoffs, and if you pick the wrong tradeoff, you may regret it for a very long time. Any time you have one part of a program talk to another part of a program, you have a protocol. In this talk, we'll dig into the details of how WebSockets work and what decisions the designers made.
Theory
Leah Hanson

* Introduction to Clojure

Move fast and break things in this 100-minute, introductory-level Clojure workshop!
Practice
Katherine Fellows

* Introduction to Neural Networks with Tensorflow

I intend to introduce Neural Networks as a very simple concept. This can be achieved with Google's newest open-source library in Python called Tensorflow. I want to dispel the myth that Neural Networks are hard to understand and implement. I also want to introduce the current state of Neural Networks as they are continually changing the landscape of visual recognition and natural language processing.
Theory
Nick McClure

* Kubernetes 101

So you've containerized your application, and now you want to deploy it scalably across a cluster. Kubernetes is your tool for container service management; learn how to use it.
Practice
Josh Berkus

* Machine Learning 101: How to get started with Convolutional Neural Networks

Machine learning and especially convolutional neural networks are on the rise. With the sheer limitless amount of data and cheap computation power, neural networks can now solve problems which have been fairly complex in the past. Cole and Hannes will demonstrate how you implement a convolutional neural network with a few lines of Python code to classify images, recognize voices or understand texts.
Theory
Hannes Hapke, Cole Howard

* Massively Parallel Testing at MongoDB

When the engineering team at MongoDB pushes a commit, we have to test it on every platform and configuration that we support. This adds up to hundreds of hours of tests for each commit. In order to make this process efficient, we built Evergreen, an in-house continuous integration tool and leveraged new technologies, such as Go and dynamic host allocation, to streamline the process to minutes. This talk will show you how we parallelize our tests and how you can apply these techniques to your next project!
Theory
Shraya Ramani, Kyle Erf

* Micro-services provide some benefits, but at what cost?

Several years ago, there was an architectural paradigm shift toward "micro-services" and away from the "monolithic" application stack. A micro-service architecture comes with scalability and replaceability, among others, but is it worth the time and effort to build it? Is it worth debugging API calls gone wrong? If you're thinking about making this move, have already started, or have already deployed to production, this is an ideal venue to see what others are doing with micro-services.
Theory
Serge Domkowski

* Monitoring Asynchronous Applications

The lure of asynchronous programming is that it will make your application run faster and your code simpler to reason about. So we have our wonderfully efficient non-blocking app; how do we check that it's delivering the goods performance wise?
Practice
Amy Boyle

* Open Hardware Roadmap: From Here to Open Consumer Electronics

Open hardware is just getting off the ground. What is the path from where we are today to a world in which open hardware is as ubiquitous as open software? This talk lays out a roadmap, recounts the milestones already achieved, describes the milestones that are within sight, and predicts the milestones yet to come.
Business
Joshua Lifton

* Postcards from the Edge Case: When One Size Doesn't Fit All

For every average person that finds your product what they want, there is a person outside that average that wants to use your product. They might even be able to use your product, if there was a way to make it work for them. Outliers are useful for your design, if you harness them properly.
Culture
Alex Byrne

* Readable Regular Expressions: A Hands-On Workshop

What are regular expressions, what are they useful for, and why are they so hard to read? We'll learn what regular expressions are good for, how to make our own regular expressions, and how to make our regular expressions friendly and readable (yes it's possible... sometimes).
Practice
Trey Hunner

* Spelunking with ǝpoɔᴉu∩

What do a fistbump emoji, Mandarin Chinese, and rocket ships have in common? They're all represented with entries in Unicode, the biggest, baddest, and most widely-used open standard. In this talk, we'll explore the messy and conflicting ideas that humans call "text", and how we represent those ideas in software.
Theory
John Feminella

* Tightly coupling your (REST) API docs

Documenting REST APIs isn't easy, and we need practical tips and tricks for keeping docs in sync with design and implementation. This talk explores some different but related ways to accomplish the goals of user-friendly, always up-to-date API docs.
Theory
Jennifer Rondeau

* Turning Sensors into Signals: Humanizing IoT with Old Smartphones and the Web

People are already tired of the over-promise of IoT - the slew of marginally useful products, the overly confusing and crowded developer space, and endless examples of how to turn an LED on and off. Take a break, step back from the crowd, and come learn how to solve real human problems with that old phone that's collecting dust on your shelf.
Hacks
Rabimba Karanjai

* User-centered open source projects

Open-source projects often struggle with finding contributors and getting off of the ground. Lessons learned all point to putting the user first.
Culture
Jackie Kazil

Favorite proposals for this user

* A programmers guide to Music.

Imagine a place where Ruby meets Music, its called MAGIC LAND. Music is not a lot different from programming. In this talk we will see how. I will talk about this amazing piece of open-source software called SonicPi. SonicPi is a new kind of musical instrument. Think about it, you write code to make music. And it gets even better, code is written in a ruby DSL. Also I will talk about notes, samples, synth and other musical things SonicPi lets us do it. Don't worry if do not get these terms. When I started, I did not either. But at the end of the talk, you will know how to make music.
Culture 2016-03-16 21:02:52 +0000
Rishi Jain

* Becoming a Web Developer

The web is ubiquitous, having beaten out a litany of competing technologies, and many “native applications” rely on web-based back-ends. From desktop to mobile, to watches, virtual reality headsets, and cars -- the web is a core set of technologies with vast reach. This makes familiarity with web technology a valuable asset for many, many people. Whether you’re a software engineer, marketer, project manager, junior web developer, or student -- you will leave this session with the forest, the trees, and a compass for navigating all of it.
Practice 2016-04-11 01:03:54 +0000
Josh Simmons

* Can You Build a Marketing Department on Open Source?

This talk will explore the state of open source marketing software, and the viability of using it to run a marketing department.
Business 2016-04-13 06:15:13 +0000
Justin Dunham

* Designing and Writing Secure Software

Attackers only need to be right once, but developers have to be right all the time. Secure software development practices are essential.
Practice 2016-04-13 23:34:56 +0000
Aaron Jensen

* From Mess to Success

- 3 Secrets to Win at Organizing for Higher Performance
Theory 2016-03-26 15:12:29 +0000
Nancy L Gaines

* From Open-Source Code to Open-Source Project

Having a successful open-source project is more than putting your code on Github.
Culture 2016-04-13 21:43:32 +0000
Aaron Jensen

* How I unexpectedly built a monster of an open source project

In 2009, Oh My Zsh was released. It's since become a popular open source tool used by developers around the world. Let's walk through how a really small idea turned into a big project.
Culture 2016-04-11 22:17:44 +0000
Robby Russell

* Machine Learning: Key Battleground for Open Source Technology

Despite all the attention and buzz, Machine learning(ML) is woefully overlooked in the community of free and open source technology. In this presentation, I will examine the still prevalent proprietary legacy of ML, introduce the current open source stack of ML development and applications, and evaluate new proprietary attempts entering ML. Then, I will share with you the strategy recipes that we may need, in a battle to keep the booming field of ML free and open source.
Culture 2016-04-14 06:53:01 +0000
Helen Jiang

* Transpreneur: Tales of a FTM Transgender Entrepreneur

The primary reason I was able to make career pivots at Intel was due to my connections to the Women at Intel network. Through this network I was referred to career counselors, business contacts, and the technical experts I needed to move my career ahead. As an FTM, my inbox is still filled with opportunities from women in tech groups, but now when I see these emails I wonder if I will be welcomed or not. A recent email I received said specifically "if you are female please attend." As a person who now identifies as male, I find that my connection to the community that supported me for the entirety of my career is now becoming tenuous.
Culture 2016-04-14 15:35:59 +0000
Sev Leonard

* You Can’t Make Money in Open Source…?

Open source is an incredibly powerful engine for great software, but not so much for making money. Or so they say.
Business 2016-04-13 06:14:09 +0000
Justin Dunham