Kyle Erf's favorites

Favorite sessions for this user

* Dodge Disasters and March to Triumph as a Mentor

Good engineers write good code, but the best engineers raise the skills of their junior colleagues, too. If you're a senior engineer, you must learn to mentor new hires. Besides, great mentors are critical to the careers of women and minorities in tech. I have failed at mentoring, then succeeded. Learn from me and march to mentorship triumph.
Culture
A. Jesse Jiryu Davis

* Finding funding for an open source based business

Ever had an open source project and wanted to figure out how to get funding for it? In this talk we'll discuss different funding methods, what angel's look for in open source companies, and potential funding options in Portland.
Business
Meghan McClelland

* Hogwarts is a Terrible Learning Environment: Discuss

Like many young Muggles of the early 00's, I dreamed of receiving my Hogwarts letter. But re-reading the series with an eye toward learning lessons about creating a positive learning environment, it's clear that Hogwarts School of Witchcraft and Wizardry contains some unfortunate lessons in what NOT to do. When it comes to crafting an environment that encourages asking questions, fosters cooperation, and ensuring the success of its developers -- I mean, wizards -- we can learn a lot from the mistakes of the Hogwarts faculty. In this magical talk, you'll learn how to be a better mentor and help your workplace become a place where your junior developers can flourish.
Culture
Lacey Williams Henschel

* HTTP/2 and Asynchronous APIs

HTTP/2 (H2) is coming, and along with it a whole new way of communicating over the web. Connection re-use, prioritization, multiplexing, and server push are just some of the features in H2.
Theory
Davey Shafik

* Inside Websockets

Protocol design is about tradeoffs, and if you pick the wrong tradeoff, you may regret it for a very long time. Any time you have one part of a program talk to another part of a program, you have a protocol. In this talk, we'll dig into the details of how WebSockets work and what decisions the designers made.
Theory
Leah Hanson

* Massively Parallel Testing at MongoDB

When the engineering team at MongoDB pushes a commit, we have to test it on every platform and configuration that we support. This adds up to hundreds of hours of tests for each commit. In order to make this process efficient, we built Evergreen, an in-house continuous integration tool and leveraged new technologies, such as Go and dynamic host allocation, to streamline the process to minutes. This talk will show you how we parallelize our tests and how you can apply these techniques to your next project!
Theory
Shraya Ramani, Kyle Erf

* Open sourced tools for Agent Based Modeling

Agent-based modeling is a technique used to explore both complexity and emergence by simulating individual actors and their actions inside of a system. Think of systems such as the traffic in the city or financial markets where one actor can have an effect on the decisions of others until the system’s direction changes its course. During this survey, you will gain an understanding of open source software available in a variety of languages and how to get started quickly.
Practice
Jackie Kazil

* Security Starts With You: Social Engineering

Virus? There’s an app for that. Malware? There’s an app for that. Social engineering? It's a little more complicated. These techniques, used by hackers to gather information on their target, are hard to combat without education - so why don’t we talk about them more often? Aimed at the average user who could be targeted by such an attack, this talk discusses the tools of social engineering, how it can be combated and why so many companies fail in preparing their employees for such an attack.
Theory
Tiberius Hefflin

* Sustainable Career Development: Advancing While Still Having Free Time

In this talk, we'll examine the pressure in the tech industry to participate in work-related extracurriculars like side projects and meetups. We'll analyze where these expectations come from, what they're actually getting at, and talk about ideas for progressing in our careers without losing sight of the things in life that make us happy outside of work.
Culture
Noelle Daley

* The Ability to Disable: Who Did You Forget When You Designed Your UI?

While the increased use of technology has in some ways improved the lives of those with disabilities, there is a gap that still needs to be filled. Uncaptioned or poorly captioned videos leave the deaf and hard of hearing community out of the loop, untagged photos leave blind users unaware of integral information, and poorly coded webpages are too much of a hassle for individuals using screen readers. But what if this was this was different? What if we thought about all of the potential users of our technology and developed programs intentionally allowing access for everyone? How could we make a programmer’s work truly inclusive, truly open to everyone? Experiential learning often provides those ‘a ha!’ moments, so together we’ll enjoy some mis-captioned videos, have a ‘listen-along’ to what a screen reader sounds like when a page is not coded correctly, and take a look at the end users’ experience when software is not programmed with a disabled audience in mind. Then, we’ll talk about what we can do to improve the current offerings and answer, “what next?”
Culture
Rebecca Jennings

* Unikernels and Containers: How to Even

Let's talk about what containers and unikernels -- two oft-compared technologies -- even are, how they work, and what problems they solve.
Practice
Mindy Preston

* User-centered open source projects

Open-source projects often struggle with finding contributors and getting off of the ground. Lessons learned all point to putting the user first.
Culture
Jackie Kazil

* Why you can't afford to miss out on junior developers

What if your next hire could make your team faster, help create a more inclusive and diverse environment, be easy to find, and be super excited to work with you? These people are not unicorns, they're junior developers. Most teams just don't know how to bring them on and get these benefits. Whether you're in a startup, consultancy, or a BigCo, with a few tips and processes, any team can learn how to grow new developers.
Practice
Bracken Mosbacker

* Yelling As A Service: Adventures in Unofficial QA

What goes into making a helpful bug report, if you're not even given access to the repository? Why should you, the user, report bugs? How do you navigate a series of gatekeepers who don't want to acknowledge your bugs? How do you maintain a good relationship with people in charge of a project that's screwing up your whole life?
Practice
Azure Lunatic

Favorite proposals for this user

* How I unexpectedly built a monster of an open source project

In 2009, Oh My Zsh was released. It's since become a popular open source tool used by developers around the world. Let's walk through how a really small idea turned into a big project.
Culture 2016-04-11 22:17:44 +0000
Robby Russell

* Machine Ethics and Emerging Technologies

An autonomous car is driving down a single-lane road carved out of a cliff. Unexpectedly, a child runs in front the car chasing a ball, and trips. The car cannot stop in time to avoid a fatal collision, but it can sacrifice itself and its passenger by driving off the cliff. Should it? And if so, would you buy such a car?
Theory 2016-04-14 07:32:44 +0000
Paul Fenwick

* Open Source Your Ideas: Why You Should Keep A Blog

Blogging is a great way for developers to share with the community the kind of things they've been learning and working on. By keeping a regularly updated blog, we force ourselves to continually evaluate the things we're learning, while sharing these ideas with the community at large.
Culture 2016-03-27 23:52:56 +0000
Andrew Pierce

* Stronger Than Fear: Mental Health in the Developer Community

Mental disorders are the largest contributor to disease burden in North America, but the developer community and those who employ us are afraid to face the problem head-on. In this talk, we'll examine the state of mental health awareness in the developer workplace, why most developers feel it isn't safe to talk about mental health, and what we can do to change the culture and save lives. Attendees will leave with 5 things they can do to make their workplace safer for those dealing with mental health disorders.
Culture 2016-03-26 03:07:30 +0000
Ed Finkler

* Twitter Bots for Community Building! (or How Do You Know When Someone Wants to go Vegan? Don't Worry, They'll Tweet About It)

I built my first Twitter bot in Node js to help automate a task: giving advice to people interested in being vegan. Simple enough! But even simple bots require love, maintenance, and moderation, to keep them useful, and more importantly, positive! How do you design and code a bot to engage with people in a way that maximizes positive interactions, and minimizes negative ones? I'll tell you what I did.
Practice 2016-04-21 05:28:38 +0000
Andrew Gardner

* You Can’t Make Money in Open Source…?

Open source is an incredibly powerful engine for great software, but not so much for making money. Or so they say.
Business 2016-04-13 06:14:09 +0000
Justin Dunham