Trey Hunner's favorites

Favorite sessions for this user

* Awesome Commandline Tools

A showcase of beautifully crafted command line tools and some tips and tricks that make them so great.
Hacks
Amjith Ramanujam

* Behind Closed Doors: Managing Passwords in a Dangerous World

A modern application has a lot of passwords and keys floating around. Encryption keys, database passwords, and API credentials; often typed in to text files and forgotten. Fortunately a new wave of tools are emerging to help manage, update, and audit these secrets. Come learn how to avoid being the next TechCrunch headline.
Practice
Noah Kantrowitz

* Corporate Open Source Fail

What makes companies with good intentions fail so miserably at open source? How can we (as engineers and managers) influence our bosses to "do the right thing"?
Business
Sarah Sharp

* Demystifying Regular Expressions

Long ago, in the early ages of computerdom, a language was formed from the primordial fires of Tartarus. The language would bind the spells of textual strings and forever control them: The Regular Expression. How about an interactive workshop for acolytes who wish to command this strong magic?
Practice
Howard Abrams

* Dodge Disasters and March to Triumph as a Mentor

Good engineers write good code, but the best engineers raise the skills of their junior colleagues, too. If you're a senior engineer, you must learn to mentor new hires. Besides, great mentors are critical to the careers of women and minorities in tech. I have failed at mentoring, then succeeded. Learn from me and march to mentorship triumph.
Culture
A. Jesse Jiryu Davis

* Exploring Mental Illness With Open Source

Julia Nguyen leads if me, an app to share mental health experiences with loved ones. In doing so, she has explored her insecurities with mental illness, learned how to engage diverse contributors, and developed better software practices with Ruby on Rails and JavaScript. She’ll share the lessons she has learned from transforming a passion project into an open source project. Inclusion takes on many forms in an open source project, including supporting contributors from all types of backgrounds, being empathetic to their project goals, and trusting them to take lead. As a mental health project, if me must also accommodate its contributors who face their own mental health challenges. All open source projects should do the same. Managing people is just as important as managing technical contributions in software.
Culture
Julia Nguyen

* Free Culture in an Expensive World

Money is a common worry, inside the open source community and out, but we often feel uncomfortable discussing it. We’ll talk about why that is and how our social norms around money impact who participates in open source and how they do so. The heart of this talk will be a series of case studies based on interviews with community members covering various economic models for open source, including worker co-ops, grant-funded and academic projects, for-profit business models, crowdfunding campaigns, and all-volunteer projects. We’ll explore the sustainability of each model as well as how they deal with the social pressures outlined in the first part of the talk.
Business
Shauna Gordon-McKeon

* Graph Databases WIll Change Your Freakin Life

Most developer have worked with relational DBs like MySQL or PostgreSQL, but for many use cases they aren't the best option. Graph databases have a simpler, more powerful model for handling complex related data. In this talk we'll work with Neo4j to explore the advantages of graph DBs. Attendees will learn the graph model, how graph DBs let you do things that are practically impossible with SQL, and the best options for integrating one into your application -- new or existing.
Practice
Ed Finkler

* Hogwarts is a Terrible Learning Environment: Discuss

Like many young Muggles of the early 00's, I dreamed of receiving my Hogwarts letter. But re-reading the series with an eye toward learning lessons about creating a positive learning environment, it's clear that Hogwarts School of Witchcraft and Wizardry contains some unfortunate lessons in what NOT to do. When it comes to crafting an environment that encourages asking questions, fosters cooperation, and ensuring the success of its developers -- I mean, wizards -- we can learn a lot from the mistakes of the Hogwarts faculty. In this magical talk, you'll learn how to be a better mentor and help your workplace become a place where your junior developers can flourish.
Culture
Lacey Williams Henschel

* Make Your First Open Source Contribution on GitHub

Interested in becoming a contributor to open source projects? In this talk, I'm going to show you the technical aspects involved in working with git and GitHub to prepare and submit contributions, and then working with project maintainers to get them merged.
Practice
Miguel Grinberg

* Python setup help for "Readable Regular Expressions: A Hands-On Workshop"

This is an open session for people to get help setting up Python to prepare for the "Readable Regular Expressions: A Hands-On Workshop" longform session the next day.
Practice
Trey Hunner

* Readable Regular Expressions: A Hands-On Workshop

What are regular expressions, what are they useful for, and why are they so hard to read? We'll learn what regular expressions are good for, how to make our own regular expressions, and how to make our regular expressions friendly and readable (yes it's possible... sometimes).
Practice
Trey Hunner

* Taking no for an answer

Open source (like many fields) rewards people who are confident and even a bit pushy. So we give talks encouraging folk to get over imposter syndrome, lean in, say yes to more things. But self-improvement shouldn't focus only on our most vulnerable members, but also our most powerful. So let's talk not about saying yes, but about hearing no. Learning to take no for an answer can transform efforts such as security, diversity and mentoring where we have few experts or volunteers and great need. Let's talk about accepting "defeat" with grace, and how to take "no" for an answer while still moving forwards.
Culture
Terri Oda

* The Rise of Emoji

Emoji is taking over the Web! We will look at how the phenomenon of Emoji has taken the Web by storm, explore how people are using Emoji on their favorite platforms and implications. We will also examine how these online platforms are benefiting from Emoji.
Culture
Alolita Sharma

* User-centered open source projects

Open-source projects often struggle with finding contributors and getting off of the ground. Lessons learned all point to putting the user first.
Culture
Jackie Kazil

* Wiping Away the (Bad) Lines in the Sand in the Software Developer Community

Think of a shibboleth as a proverbial line in the sand that determines who belongs and who is an outsider. There are a lot of arbitrary shibboleths in programming. Text editors (emacs vs. vim vs. sublime), paradigms (object-oriented vs. functional), languages (everyone vs Java), type systems, are all topics of… to put it lightly, “vigorous conversation.” In set theory terms, the developer community does not do enough to encourage seeing different developer groups as unions instead of intersections. To a newcomer, this situation sets up too much of a danger of alienation. If someone makes fun of the language that you use to learn how to code, then you’re less likely to want to keep learning.
Culture
Walé Ogundipé

Favorite proposals for this user

* Technical writing as public service: working on open source in government

What if U.S. federal agencies decided to reuse and contribute to open source software projects built by other agencies, since agencies often have similar technology problems to solve? And what if they hired technical writers with open source community experience to write documentation for these projects? That would be pretty cool. Also, that’s my work. I'm part of 18F, a digital services consulting team within and for the federal government, and all of our work is open source.
Practice 2016-04-06 00:21:15 +0000
Britta Gustafson