Emily Stamey's favorites

Favorite sessions for this user

* A programmers guide to Music.

Imagine a place where Ruby meets Music, its called MAGIC LAND. Music is not a lot different from programming. In this talk we will see how. I will talk about this amazing piece of open-source software called SonicPi. SonicPi is a new kind of musical instrument. Think about it, you write code to make music. And it gets even better, code is written in a ruby DSL. Also I will talk about notes, samples, synth and other musical things SonicPi lets us do it. Don't worry if do not get these terms. When I started, I did not either. But at the end of the talk, you will know how to make music.
Culture
Rishi Jain

* Awesome Commandline Tools

A showcase of beautifully crafted command line tools and some tips and tricks that make them so great.
Hacks
Amjith Ramanujam

* Bringing OOP Best Practices to the World of Functional Programming

I transitioned from writing software in imperative, object-oriented (OO) programming languages to doing functional programming (FP) full-time, and you can do it, too! In this talk, I'll make a case for FP in the corporate development environment, cover some cases where common FP language features substitute for design patterns and OOP structure, and provide some examples of translating traditional OO design patterns into functional code.
Practice
Elana Hashman

* Corporate Open Source Fail

What makes companies with good intentions fail so miserably at open source? How can we (as engineers and managers) influence our bosses to "do the right thing"?
Business
Sarah Sharp

* Creating a Third Wave of Free/Open Source Software

The free/open source software movement is over thirty years old, and has gone through a number of changes in that time, spawning projects large and small (including OpenConferenceWare, which runs this site!). If Free Software is the first generation, and Open Source is the second, current efforts toward creating an inclusive and sustainable world make up a third generation that we can start to form into a broader plan.
Culture
Audrey Eschright

* Deployment as a Feature

Too often the deployment of software is treated as a necessary evil. When you design your deployments as a feature of your system, the productivity gains will surprise you.
Theory
Carl Hall

* Distributed Consensus with Raft

Getting people to agree to things is sometimes hard. But implementing consensus with computers is harder. And distributed consensus with computers is ​_really_​ hard. How do we do it? One answer: the distributed consensus algorithm known as _Raft_.
Theory
John Feminella

* Enabling Open Source Contributors at Puppet

As open source software developers and community maintainers, fostering an inclusive community and giving contributors the tools they need to succeed is incredibly important, but not always easy. This is especially true when you have a complex distributed codebase and contributors without a background in software development. Through our attempts to enable our contributors we’ve encountered many challenges and iterated on many solutions with varying levels of success. Our hope is that by sharing the stories of our successes and failures, as well as the lessons we learned, we can help other community maintainers lower the barrier to entry for contributors.
Culture
Hailee Kenney, Morgan Rhodes

* Exit Condition: when to ragequit, raise hell, or duck and cover

If you're caught in a job or a project where you simply can't convince your colleagues or organization to treat you with respect, it often feels like you're in a maze with no clear way out. (Un)fortunately, you're not alone. There's no universal solution to navigating a toxic or abusive workplace, but there's power in finding a theoretical context, sharing our stories, and learning from each other. Come learn about the options of voice, loyalty, and exit, and hear the stories of others who have had to make hard choices.
Culture
Frances Hocutt

* Exploring Mental Illness With Open Source

Julia Nguyen leads if me, an app to share mental health experiences with loved ones. In doing so, she has explored her insecurities with mental illness, learned how to engage diverse contributors, and developed better software practices with Ruby on Rails and JavaScript. She’ll share the lessons she has learned from transforming a passion project into an open source project. Inclusion takes on many forms in an open source project, including supporting contributors from all types of backgrounds, being empathetic to their project goals, and trusting them to take lead. As a mental health project, if me must also accommodate its contributors who face their own mental health challenges. All open source projects should do the same. Managing people is just as important as managing technical contributions in software.
Culture
Julia Nguyen

* Finding funding for an open source based business

Ever had an open source project and wanted to figure out how to get funding for it? In this talk we'll discuss different funding methods, what angel's look for in open source companies, and potential funding options in Portland.
Business
Meghan McClelland

* Free Culture in an Expensive World

Money is a common worry, inside the open source community and out, but we often feel uncomfortable discussing it. We’ll talk about why that is and how our social norms around money impact who participates in open source and how they do so. The heart of this talk will be a series of case studies based on interviews with community members covering various economic models for open source, including worker co-ops, grant-funded and academic projects, for-profit business models, crowdfunding campaigns, and all-volunteer projects. We’ll explore the sustainability of each model as well as how they deal with the social pressures outlined in the first part of the talk.
Business
Shauna Gordon-McKeon

* Geek Choir

In this session, we explore ways to improve team cohesion, cooperation, and presence for each other through connecting via song.
Culture
Michael Alan Brewer

* Generations of Open Source and what to do about it

Open source has moved from experimental to mainstream in the past 10 years, but has definitely changed the landscape in the last 15 years. Because of that, we have a few generations of people within the broader ecosystem, and they probably have no idea that all of these communities exist, much less the fact that there's a whole ocean of a open source technology industry out there.
Business
Amye Scavarda

* Graph Databases WIll Change Your Freakin Life

Most developer have worked with relational DBs like MySQL or PostgreSQL, but for many use cases they aren't the best option. Graph databases have a simpler, more powerful model for handling complex related data. In this talk we'll work with Neo4j to explore the advantages of graph DBs. Attendees will learn the graph model, how graph DBs let you do things that are practically impossible with SQL, and the best options for integrating one into your application -- new or existing.
Practice
Ed Finkler

* Great Asana!

Bring your stiff shoulders, sore wrists, tight hips, aching back, and busy mind and explore how Yoga can help bring you relief, rest, and focus. Leave with ideas on how to incorporate 5 minutes of practice into your busy day to care for your body and mind. This class is accessible to all levels of ability.
Culture
Sherri Koehler

* Hardware Hula Hoops and Flow

In psychology flow is the honed in energized focus you get when performing tasks that are challenging that can be experienced in hula hooping and programming.
Hacks
Lindsey Bieda

* HTTP/2 and Asynchronous APIs

HTTP/2 (H2) is coming, and along with it a whole new way of communicating over the web. Connection re-use, prioritization, multiplexing, and server push are just some of the features in H2.
Theory
Davey Shafik

* Less Painful Legacy Code Replacement

Replacing legacy code is a challenge on every front, from managing stakeholder expectations to tackling the technical work. Thoughtful preparation and a pocket full of tools can make the experience a little less painful.
Practice
Jennifer Tu

* Let’s build a CI/CD pipeline

An exploration of the cost and value of CI/CD, and a walkthrough of setting up a CI/CD pipeline.
Practice
Jean de Klerk

* Librarians and Open Source: We Need Code, Too!

Getting people started is easy. Sustaining people through is not. Let's talk about the ways the Open Source community can help people beyond the beginning steps, in the context of public library programming and staff development.
Culture
Alex Byrne

* Micro-services provide some benefits, but at what cost?

Several years ago, there was an architectural paradigm shift toward "micro-services" and away from the "monolithic" application stack. A micro-service architecture comes with scalability and replaceability, among others, but is it worth the time and effort to build it? Is it worth debugging API calls gone wrong? If you're thinking about making this move, have already started, or have already deployed to production, this is an ideal venue to see what others are doing with micro-services.
Theory
Serge Domkowski

* Monitoring Asynchronous Applications

The lure of asynchronous programming is that it will make your application run faster and your code simpler to reason about. So we have our wonderfully efficient non-blocking app; how do we check that it's delivering the goods performance wise?
Practice
Amy Boyle

* More Than Binary: Inclusive Gender Collection and You

Many people identify their gender in many ways. So why do we build systems to capture accurate gender information with a dropdown that only lists “male” and “female”? This talk covers why you might want to consider alternative ways of selecting gender for your users, a brief overview of the current best practices, the case study of the decisions I made when creating my open source project Gender Amender (a library you can help work on right now!), and why more work needs to be done. I'd also like to facilitate a short discussion during the time slot, so that we can share varied perspectives on how to improve the entire process of gender collection, and articulate the lenses through which we can and should view gender (e.g. “what are some other data structures we could use to capture gender identity information?”).
Practice
Anne DeCusatis

* Open Source and Diabetes: Helping Millions

This talk will cover the fascinating things happening in the open source diabetes tech (D Tech) space (think the Glucosio Project and Nightscout Project) and will emphasize the importance of open source in improving the health outcomes of people with diabetes.
Culture
Benjamin Kerensa

* Open Source is Key for Innovating Pedagogy and Curricula

This talk will discuss how a closed loop in education—across all grade levels and disciplines—contributes to the stagnation of a profession and how an open source approach and platform is necessary to break the inward cycle of our current pedagogy. It will also show examples of collaboration in the creation of curricula leading to the generation of new, innovative pedagogy and review current methods for educators to open source and call for new methods and platforms to aid educators.
Culture
Gary Rozanc

* Pulling up Your Legacy App by its Bootstraps!

Your mission, should you choose to accept it, is to support an application built on an older framework. What would you do if changing the code broke everything? The application functionality is too large to be replaced in one release. What can you do? You can bootstrap it, replacing the application in sections as time allows. When all functionality is replaced, you can put your new codebase into a newer framework or a standalone application.
Hacks
Emily Stamey

* Security Starts With You: Social Engineering

Virus? There’s an app for that. Malware? There’s an app for that. Social engineering? It's a little more complicated. These techniques, used by hackers to gather information on their target, are hard to combat without education - so why don’t we talk about them more often? Aimed at the average user who could be targeted by such an attack, this talk discusses the tools of social engineering, how it can be combated and why so many companies fail in preparing their employees for such an attack.
Theory
Tiberius Hefflin

* Sparkle security

"Agent Sparkle, you have been recruited as a security expert to use your skills to protect the kingdom of Project Rainbow. You might not feel qualified yet, but Project Rainbow has great faith in your ability to learn." Web security is perhaps one of most fun types of computer security to master: exploits can be constructed quickly and without many tools. But sadly, while there are many tutorials, they simply don't have enough rainbows and sparkles and the practice exploits tend to focus on the basics without flourishes. Project Sparkle is a set of "training missions" designed to make learning web security more kid-friendly, but we think the audience of Open Source Bridge will also enjoy exploiting the web to add more rainbows and sparkles!
Practice
Terri Oda

* Spelunking with ǝpoɔᴉu∩

What do a fistbump emoji, Mandarin Chinese, and rocket ships have in common? They're all represented with entries in Unicode, the biggest, baddest, and most widely-used open standard. In this talk, we'll explore the messy and conflicting ideas that humans call "text", and how we represent those ideas in software.
Theory
John Feminella

* Supporting diversity with a new approach to software

It’s time for a new approach to software, one that embraces differences (not just tolerates them), and sees diversity as a strength. The industry is primed for change, and there are huge opportunities to do better by valuing emotion, intuition, compassion, purpose, empowerment, sustainability, and social justice. This highly-interactive session includes discussions of current “best practices” and emerging ideas from projects that have focused heavily on diversity, issues and problems in today’s environment, imagining how things could be different, and figuring out concrete steps to make it happen.
Theory
Jon Pincus, Tammarrian Rogers

* Sustainable Career Development: Advancing While Still Having Free Time

In this talk, we'll examine the pressure in the tech industry to participate in work-related extracurriculars like side projects and meetups. We'll analyze where these expectations come from, what they're actually getting at, and talk about ideas for progressing in our careers without losing sight of the things in life that make us happy outside of work.
Culture
Noelle Daley

* Take back social media with Poodle

Social media has tremendous power to enrich our lives - but social media services are largely controlled by private companies. An alternative is to replace centralized services with federated protocols. HTTP and email are examples of federated protocols that demonstrate that federation not only works, but can thrive and give rise to cultures and technologies that the protocol authors never imagined. Poodle is a prototype that I hope will bring those qualities to social media.
Culture
Jesse Hallett

* Taking no for an answer

Open source (like many fields) rewards people who are confident and even a bit pushy. So we give talks encouraging folk to get over imposter syndrome, lean in, say yes to more things. But self-improvement shouldn't focus only on our most vulnerable members, but also our most powerful. So let's talk not about saying yes, but about hearing no. Learning to take no for an answer can transform efforts such as security, diversity and mentoring where we have few experts or volunteers and great need. Let's talk about accepting "defeat" with grace, and how to take "no" for an answer while still moving forwards.
Culture
Terri Oda

* Tightly coupling your (REST) API docs

Documenting REST APIs isn't easy, and we need practical tips and tricks for keeping docs in sync with design and implementation. This talk explores some different but related ways to accomplish the goals of user-friendly, always up-to-date API docs.
Theory
Jennifer Rondeau

* Turning Sensors into Signals: Humanizing IoT with Old Smartphones and the Web

People are already tired of the over-promise of IoT - the slew of marginally useful products, the overly confusing and crowded developer space, and endless examples of how to turn an LED on and off. Take a break, step back from the crowd, and come learn how to solve real human problems with that old phone that's collecting dust on your shelf.
Hacks
Rabimba Karanjai

* User-centered open source projects

Open-source projects often struggle with finding contributors and getting off of the ground. Lessons learned all point to putting the user first.
Culture
Jackie Kazil

* Welcoming Communities

A lot of people enjoy contributing to Open Source projects. And Open Source projects love contributions. And yet I keep seeing newcomers struggling to contribute and project maintainers struggling to find contributors. What’s the catch? There is a gap. A gap between the desire to contribute to a community and the ability to find one. A gap between what contributions are welcome, and what people think is wanted. A gap between what people wish they could contribute, but don’t know how, or are afraid to try. In this talk, I’ll share our learning from building the Hoodie Community, which is recognized as one of the most Open Source’s most diverse and inclusive.
Culture
Gregor Martynus

* What We Talk About When We Talk About Code

Programming and open source have plenty of specific jargon to learn. How do we make sure we're not pushing away contributors with it?
Culture
Zoe Landon

* Wiping Away the (Bad) Lines in the Sand in the Software Developer Community

Think of a shibboleth as a proverbial line in the sand that determines who belongs and who is an outsider. There are a lot of arbitrary shibboleths in programming. Text editors (emacs vs. vim vs. sublime), paradigms (object-oriented vs. functional), languages (everyone vs Java), type systems, are all topics of… to put it lightly, “vigorous conversation.” In set theory terms, the developer community does not do enough to encourage seeing different developer groups as unions instead of intersections. To a newcomer, this situation sets up too much of a danger of alienation. If someone makes fun of the language that you use to learn how to code, then you’re less likely to want to keep learning.
Culture
Walé Ogundipé

* Working Around a Project with Twenty Years of Precedents

How do you deal with a free software project that has been ongoing for many years? What happens when the original designers moved on long ago and even the elders don’t have all the answers? This session will examine how to work with existing precedents to drive evolution of the project.
Culture
Darrick Wong

Favorite proposals for this user

* How To Be A Great Developer

Being a great developer is much more than technical know-how. Empathy, communication, and reason are at least as important, but are undervalued in our industry. We'll examine the impact these skills can have and how to apply them to our work.
Culture 2016-03-26 03:14:34 +0000
Ed Finkler

* Stronger Than Fear: Mental Health in the Developer Community

Mental disorders are the largest contributor to disease burden in North America, but the developer community and those who employ us are afraid to face the problem head-on. In this talk, we'll examine the state of mental health awareness in the developer workplace, why most developers feel it isn't safe to talk about mental health, and what we can do to change the culture and save lives. Attendees will leave with 5 things they can do to make their workplace safer for those dealing with mental health disorders.
Culture 2016-03-26 03:07:30 +0000
Ed Finkler

* Technical writing as public service: working on open source in government

What if U.S. federal agencies decided to reuse and contribute to open source software projects built by other agencies, since agencies often have similar technology problems to solve? And what if they hired technical writers with open source community experience to write documentation for these projects? That would be pretty cool. Also, that’s my work. I'm part of 18F, a digital services consulting team within and for the federal government, and all of our work is open source.
Practice 2016-04-06 00:21:15 +0000
Britta Gustafson