Michael Alan Brewer's favorites

Open Source Bridge 2016

Favorite sessions for this user

* A Domain Specific Query Language Engine

This presentation is about the shortest line between a database and data exploration.
Theory
Joe Meyer

* A programmers guide to Music.

Imagine a place where Ruby meets Music, its called MAGIC LAND. Music is not a lot different from programming. In this talk we will see how. I will talk about this amazing piece of open-source software called SonicPi. SonicPi is a new kind of musical instrument. Think about it, you write code to make music. And it gets even better, code is written in a ruby DSL. Also I will talk about notes, samples, synth and other musical things SonicPi lets us do it. Don't worry if do not get these terms. When I started, I did not either. But at the end of the talk, you will know how to make music.
Culture
Rishi Jain

* Awesome Commandline Tools

A showcase of beautifully crafted command line tools and some tips and tricks that make them so great.
Hacks
Amjith Ramanujam

* Bots Not Cattle

"Cattle Not Pets" got us to the first generation of microservice infrastructures. Now it's time for a second generation metaphor: "Bots Not Cattle."
Theory
Josh Berkus

* Cassandra - an introduction

Built mostly in Java, Cassandra is a powerful open source NoSQL database, based on the model of a partitioned row store. This talk will provide general use cases for Cassandra, explain Cassandra’s architecture and its benefits, feature tools for accessing and administering Cassandra, and demonstrate how to integrate Cassandra with existing Java applications.
Practice
Hanneli Tavante

* Demystifying Regular Expressions

Long ago, in the early ages of computerdom, a language was formed from the primordial fires of Tartarus. The language would bind the spells of textual strings and forever control them: The Regular Expression. How about an interactive workshop for acolytes who wish to command this strong magic?
Practice
Howard Abrams

* Digging through the logs

Okay, so now it's time for the really fun part: We've removed the duplicate rows from the log, now we need to only show the rows that contain something that *looks like* an IP address. To do this we'll use a search pattern. These patterns are written in Regular Expressions or RegEx. Like so many other tools in Linux they're immensely powerful but either don't work at all or go haywire with a single incorrect character. Let's write one that looks for a cluster of numbers, then a period, then another cluster of numbers.
Practice
Toby Fee

* Exploring Mental Illness With Open Source

Julia Nguyen leads if me, an app to share mental health experiences with loved ones. In doing so, she has explored her insecurities with mental illness, learned how to engage diverse contributors, and developed better software practices with Ruby on Rails and JavaScript. She’ll share the lessons she has learned from transforming a passion project into an open source project. Inclusion takes on many forms in an open source project, including supporting contributors from all types of backgrounds, being empathetic to their project goals, and trusting them to take lead. As a mental health project, if me must also accommodate its contributors who face their own mental health challenges. All open source projects should do the same. Managing people is just as important as managing technical contributions in software.
Culture
Julia Nguyen

* Generations of Open Source and what to do about it

Open source has moved from experimental to mainstream in the past 10 years, but has definitely changed the landscape in the last 15 years. Because of that, we have a few generations of people within the broader ecosystem, and they probably have no idea that all of these communities exist, much less the fact that there's a whole ocean of a open source technology industry out there.
Business
Amye Scavarda

* Graph Databases WIll Change Your Freakin Life

Most developer have worked with relational DBs like MySQL or PostgreSQL, but for many use cases they aren't the best option. Graph databases have a simpler, more powerful model for handling complex related data. In this talk we'll work with Neo4j to explore the advantages of graph DBs. Attendees will learn the graph model, how graph DBs let you do things that are practically impossible with SQL, and the best options for integrating one into your application -- new or existing.
Practice
Ed Finkler

* Great Asana!

Bring your stiff shoulders, sore wrists, tight hips, aching back, and busy mind and explore how Yoga can help bring you relief, rest, and focus. Leave with ideas on how to incorporate 5 minutes of practice into your busy day to care for your body and mind. This class is accessible to all levels of ability.
Culture
Sherri Koehler

* Hogwarts is a Terrible Learning Environment: Discuss

Like many young Muggles of the early 00's, I dreamed of receiving my Hogwarts letter. But re-reading the series with an eye toward learning lessons about creating a positive learning environment, it's clear that Hogwarts School of Witchcraft and Wizardry contains some unfortunate lessons in what NOT to do. When it comes to crafting an environment that encourages asking questions, fosters cooperation, and ensuring the success of its developers -- I mean, wizards -- we can learn a lot from the mistakes of the Hogwarts faculty. In this magical talk, you'll learn how to be a better mentor and help your workplace become a place where your junior developers can flourish.
Culture
Lacey Williams Henschel

* Kubernetes 101

So you've containerized your application, and now you want to deploy it scalably across a cluster. Kubernetes is your tool for container service management; learn how to use it.
Practice
Josh Berkus

* Open source on Georgia's mind

The state of Georgia runs its web publishing platform using Drupal. This was the first open source implementation handled by any state at an enterprise level. Within a period of one year, the state needed to build a Drupal based platform and migrate 55 websites with new interface designs. This talk addresses the costs benefits Georgia saved by implementing open source and showcases some of the challenges and wins the state experienced while moving to open source.
Business
Nikhil Deshpande

* Our Unhealthy Relationship with Injection Vulnerabilities

Ever concatenated strings in your code? Did those strings include any kind of structured syntax? Then your code might be vulnerable to injection. What does that mean? I will show you the common patterns of injection that occur, what their impact might be, and how to avoid them.
Theory
Timothy Morgan

* Readable Regular Expressions: A Hands-On Workshop

What are regular expressions, what are they useful for, and why are they so hard to read? We'll learn what regular expressions are good for, how to make our own regular expressions, and how to make our regular expressions friendly and readable (yes it's possible... sometimes).
Practice
Trey Hunner

* Security Starts With You: Social Engineering

Virus? There’s an app for that. Malware? There’s an app for that. Social engineering? It's a little more complicated. These techniques, used by hackers to gather information on their target, are hard to combat without education - so why don’t we talk about them more often? Aimed at the average user who could be targeted by such an attack, this talk discusses the tools of social engineering, how it can be combated and why so many companies fail in preparing their employees for such an attack.
Theory
Tiberius Hefflin

* Spelunking with ǝpoɔᴉu∩

What do a fistbump emoji, Mandarin Chinese, and rocket ships have in common? They're all represented with entries in Unicode, the biggest, baddest, and most widely-used open standard. In this talk, we'll explore the messy and conflicting ideas that humans call "text", and how we represent those ideas in software.
Theory
John Feminella

* Take back social media with Poodle

Social media has tremendous power to enrich our lives - but social media services are largely controlled by private companies. An alternative is to replace centralized services with federated protocols. HTTP and email are examples of federated protocols that demonstrate that federation not only works, but can thrive and give rise to cultures and technologies that the protocol authors never imagined. Poodle is a prototype that I hope will bring those qualities to social media.
Culture
Jesse Hallett

* Taking no for an answer

Open source (like many fields) rewards people who are confident and even a bit pushy. So we give talks encouraging folk to get over imposter syndrome, lean in, say yes to more things. But self-improvement shouldn't focus only on our most vulnerable members, but also our most powerful. So let's talk not about saying yes, but about hearing no. Learning to take no for an answer can transform efforts such as security, diversity and mentoring where we have few experts or volunteers and great need. Let's talk about accepting "defeat" with grace, and how to take "no" for an answer while still moving forwards.
Culture
Terri Oda

* The Key Of Chaos

We built an open-hardware random number generator. We'll tell you all about it.
Theory
Bart Massey

* Type Theory 101

Have you heard about type theory and always wanted to understand the principles behind it, but always thought it was too complicated since it has a lot of Lambda Calculus and algebras? This talk will approach these concepts in a friendly way.
Theory
Hanneli Tavante

Favorite proposals for this user

* A programmers guide to Music.

Imagine a place where Ruby meets Music, its called MAGIC LAND. Music is not a lot different from programming. In this talk we will see how. I will talk about this amazing piece of open-source software called SonicPi. SonicPi is a new kind of musical instrument. Think about it, you write code to make music. And it gets even better, code is written in a ruby DSL. Also I will talk about notes, samples, synth and other musical things SonicPi lets us do it. Don't worry if do not get these terms. When I started, I did not either. But at the end of the talk, you will know how to make music.
Culture 2016-03-16 21:02:52 +0000
Rishi Jain

* Advanced filtering on your API endpoints with SQLAlchemy and FIQL

How robust is the filtering of your API? Let's delve into how a string of text can become a set of instructions to the API on exactly what records should be returned.
Theory 2016-04-12 17:11:35 +0000
Serge Domkowski

* Becoming a Web Developer

The web is ubiquitous, having beaten out a litany of competing technologies, and many “native applications” rely on web-based back-ends. From desktop to mobile, to watches, virtual reality headsets, and cars -- the web is a core set of technologies with vast reach. This makes familiarity with web technology a valuable asset for many, many people. Whether you’re a software engineer, marketer, project manager, junior web developer, or student -- you will leave this session with the forest, the trees, and a compass for navigating all of it.
Practice 2016-04-11 01:03:54 +0000
Josh Simmons

* Fail Early, Fail Often, Fail Well

If failure is inevitable, why aren't we taught how to cope with it? In this talk I outline 10 types of failure to avoid and detail a framework for navigating recovery from failures large and small.
Business 2016-04-11 00:59:34 +0000
Josh Simmons

* Full Auto Database

Why pay for always-on relational database service when you can deploy it yourself so easily? This demo-heavy talk will show off a deceptively simple high availability stack for PostgreSQL, using Docker, Etcd, Kubernetes, Patroni and Atomic.
Practice 2016-04-20 20:08:33 +0000
Josh Berkus

* How To Be A Great Developer

Being a great developer is much more than technical know-how. Empathy, communication, and reason are at least as important, but are undervalued in our industry. We'll examine the impact these skills can have and how to apply them to our work.
Culture 2016-03-26 03:14:34 +0000
Ed Finkler

* Learning HTTP

HTTP is the fabric of the web and the growing API economy. Whether you're building a backend or a frontend application, creating an API, or consuming an API, it’s helpful to understand the basics of HTTP. Topics covered will include HTTP methods, request headers, request URIs, response status codes, response headers, resource representations, authentication, content negotiation, and caching.
Theory 2016-04-14 19:32:46 +0000
Bradley Holt

* Machine Ethics and Emerging Technologies

An autonomous car is driving down a single-lane road carved out of a cliff. Unexpectedly, a child runs in front the car chasing a ball, and trips. The car cannot stop in time to avoid a fatal collision, but it can sacrifice itself and its passenger by driving off the cliff. Should it? And if so, would you buy such a car?
Theory 2016-04-14 07:32:44 +0000
Paul Fenwick

* So You're a Full-Stack Developer, Right?

So, you think you're a full-stack developer? Let's extend that to the database, for a true full-stack experience!
Hacks 2016-04-19 03:46:22 +0000
Jerry Sievert

* Software Patents After Alice: A Long and Sad Tail

The Supreme Court's ruling in the landmark Alice vs. CLS Bank case has finally given the lower courts some tools they could use to overturn obvious and vague patents, particularly frivolous patents on software. But we haven't won, because bogus patent suits are still being filed. This talk is for anyone who is wondering what the recent decisions mean for small and mid-size entities, how international treaties can impact local policy and what can be done to improve the situation.
Business 2016-04-13 17:05:45 +0000
Deb Nicholson

* Stronger Than Fear: Mental Health in the Developer Community

Mental disorders are the largest contributor to disease burden in North America, but the developer community and those who employ us are afraid to face the problem head-on. In this talk, we'll examine the state of mental health awareness in the developer workplace, why most developers feel it isn't safe to talk about mental health, and what we can do to change the culture and save lives. Attendees will leave with 5 things they can do to make their workplace safer for those dealing with mental health disorders.
Culture 2016-03-26 03:07:30 +0000
Ed Finkler

* The JSON-Driven Schema

Learn how to use Postgres to explore a JSON data set.
Practice 2016-04-12 16:58:07 +0000
Jason Owen

* When Harry Met Iannis 2016

Iannis Xenakis passed away on February 4, 2001. When he arrived in Heaven, he sought out his mentor, Olivier Messiaen. Messiaen said, “Iannis, there’s someone here I want you to meet.” The two walked over to a small sidewalk cafe, and there sat Harry Partch. And so from this fanciful meeting in Heaven, “When Harry Met Iannis” was born. Now I'm not a carpenter like Partch was, and I don't have access to conductors or orchestras like Xenakis did, so I'll have to synthesize instruments and performers. The software that makes this possible is an open-source language called ChucK. I'll talk a bit about the Partch music theory, Xenakis' use of game theory and the ChucK language. But mostly, this talk is about the music and not the tools that made it. And you'll be the first to hear "When Harry Met Iannis 2016" in its entirety.
Practice 2016-03-15 03:35:20 +0000
M. Edward (Ed) Borasky

Open Source Bridge 2015

Favorite sessions for this user

* Care and Feeding of a Healthy Job Hunt

A job hunt can be a demoralizing and dehumanizing process, but there are a lot of things which you can do to make it more productive and less stressful.
Business
VM Brasseur

* Open Source Tools for Scientific Research

Come learn about open science and the tools available for modern scientific research.
Chemistry
Amy Boyle

Favorite proposals for this user

* Intermediate Bash

Level up your command line skills. Get tips for moving beyond mere proficiency at the command line.
Hacks 2015-03-06 08:56:55 +0000
Amy Boyle

* Making music with Free/Libre/Open tools

The range of options for music-making on GNU/Linux with free/libre/open tools stretches from music-focused programming languages like CSound and PureData to simple tools like Audacity, Ardour, Guitarix, Hydrogen, and Musescore which are accessible to novice members of the general public. We'll explore the options for different sorts of musical creativity, focusing on the basic tools and how to get them set up effectively on GNU/Linux. In the session, we'll produce some brief compositions and recordings as we explore the software.
Hacks 2015-03-08 05:00:14 +0000
Aaron Wolf

* The Dead Language Fallacy

Our precious programming languages are being struck with a plague. Each year another language is declared dead or dying. But is that true or simply the tech equivalent of tabloid reporting?
Culture 2015-03-07 21:17:21 +0000
VM Brasseur

Open Source Bridge 2014

Favorite sessions for this user

* "Why are these people following me?": Leadership for the introverted, uncertain, and astonished

So you've had an idea, or noticed a gap that needs filling, or wondered why no one's talking about an issue you care about. Like the motivated and competent person you are, you start working, or writing, or talking. People start noticing you, listening to you, even asking for your opinion about their own projects--and one day, you realize they're treating you just like you treat your own role models. You find this unsettling. Surely motivation and competence aren't that special, you think. You, a leader? Can't be. And if you actually are a leader, what do you do now?
Culture
Frances Hocutt

* A Few Python Tips

Nothing fancy here, just several tips that help you work effectively with Python. This talk is licensed CC BY; please feel free to reuse it at your company or conference.
Cooking
Sumana Harihareswara

* A short examination on the intersection of security and usability (or How usable security could save us all)

This talk is geared for people with minimal experience with usability and some experience with security
Chemistry
Morgan Miller

* Advanced Javascript Basics for Web Developers

Javascript is a necessity for modern web development. Whether it is to add more interactivity to your user interface, or provide a client to interact with your API, chances are, even if you're trying to avoid working in javascript, you're working in javascript. Projects like Coffeescript and Opal, while useful, still do not help understand the javascript outputted by these compile-able languages. One growing concern in this realm is that an application's javascript can sometimes be a security concern, easily exploited by a malicious user. In order to catch these concerns, you must know what your javascript does, inside and out. This talk will illustrate concepts to make sure your client code is secure, while still giving your team the flexibility it needs to keep building your stellar app!
Chemistry
Lauren Voswinkel

* Airplanes : Sailboats :: Mobile : Desktop

What if the way that airplanes were designed and how it improved sailing had some deep lessons around the future of user experience? Sailboats improved significantly after the discovery of flight, and mobile design is improving a great deal of user experience as well. How can we think about applying these lessons? What's still missing?
Culture
Amye Scavarda

* An Adventure in Data Modeling: The Entity-Attribute-Value Model

A case study on the trials of Emma's performance when implementing the Entity-Attribute-Value data model on their PostgreSQL database systems.
Chemistry
Mark Wong

* Beyond Leaning In: How to Negotiate to Get What You Want

Now that you know how important it is to ask for want you want, come learn how to negotiate in a way that will get you what you need. For everyone of any gender identity who works at a company or freelances, who feels like a newb or an expert, this presentation will teach you effective, practical skills to improve your negotiations and deal confidently with conflicts.
Business
Katie Lane

* Build your own exobrain

Online services like "If This Then That" (IFTTT) are great for automating your life. However they provide limited ways for the end-user to add their own services, and often require credentials that one may normally wish to keep secret. The 'exobrain' project allows for service integration and extension on a machine *you* control.
Cooking
Paul Fenwick

* Civilizing IRC and forums: moderation strategies for mutual respect

As a project's public IRC channel or forum grows, it's hard to keep it friendly. People get frustrated with each other, people have "different" senses of humor, disagreements escalate...oh goodness, it can be a mess. This isn't great for retaining community members or welcoming new ones. I'll share my strategies for dealing with problems, learned at the scale of hundreds of forum threads, tens of thousands of forum visitors, and dozens of IRC chatters every day.
Culture
Britta Gustafson

* Confessions of a DBA: worst and best things I've done in production

In the past 15 years, I've done some pretty horrendous things around the M in LAMP. I will balance this with good things I've done too.
Cooking
Emily Slocombe

* Crash Course in Tech Management

Managing is a skill which you can master just as you did programming. This session will introduce you to many of the skills and resources you’ll need to become a successful tech manager (and keep your team from wanting to string you up).
Business
VM Brasseur

* Data, Privacy, & Trust in Open Source: 10 Lessons from Wikipedia

Few people today are not concerned with the way data is used to enhance or subvert individual privacy. This is especially true on the Web, where open source technologies are behind much of what we interact with and use on a daily basis. As the most fundamental aspects of our lives become networked -- social relationships, work, finance, and even how we get our food -- how can we make sure that open source technologies foster a sense of trust with users, protect their privacy, and still give data scientists the tools they need to gain insight?
Culture
Steven Walling

* Hacking In-Group Bias for Fun and Profit

Our lives and social interactions are governed by sociology and psychology. As geeks, we strive to understand how the technology around us works, and we strive to find ways to make it better. Society is basically one big, complex piece of technology, and, like all technology, it is hackable. This talk will explain how you can do that.
Culture
Kat Toomajian

* Internet Archive: More than the Wayback Machine

In this session we will: * Give you a tour of Internet Archive and its collections * Introduce you to the APIs and tools you can use to access and contribute to the Archive * Show examples of how other people and institutions are using the Archive
Chemistry
VM Brasseur, Alexis Rossi

* Knitting for programmers

Yeah, you've seen us knitting during talks. I promise we're paying more attention than the people with their laptops open. Well, now learn how we do what we do... the programmer way. I'll start with the topology of individual stitches and go through geometry to design patterns, and by the end of it you'll know how to knit a sweater.
Hacks
Alex Bayley

* Making your mobile web app accessible

Accessibility - It's important. Learn how to make your mobile web app accessible to everyone.
Cooking
Eitan Isaacson

* Math vs. Mathematics

Most people got through their high school math classes by memorizing nonsensical statements and regurgitating them on command. If you came out of that class hating math, no one would blame you, especially not a mathematician. However, that class didn't teach Intro to Algebra, it taught Intermediate Following Instructions.
Chemistry
Georgia Reh, Jenner Hanni

* NerdCred++; How to Customize your Bash Prompt

The terminal is a powerful tool on any developer’s belt. The command line interface provides extensive functionality via simple entry of commands. In this workshop we will customize the development experience by adding personal ⭐︎flair⭐︎ and making the most of limited screen real estate. Customizing the prompt provides additional information and functionality with the bonus of flair. Participants will be able to take pride in custom craftsmanship with the result.
Hacks
Pamela Ocampo, Rachel Walker

* Nest + Pellet Stove + Yurt

Nest is a twenty-first century take on a nineteenth century thermostat. A pellet stove is a modern version of a campfire that won't burn the house down. A modern yurt is a high tech tent based on an age old Mongolian design. Can they all work together?
Hacks
Lars Lohn

* Open Source is Not Enough: The Importance of Algorithm Transparency

Opaque algorithms increasingly control our access to information, on the web and beyond. Why is that a problem, and what can we do about it?
Culture
Rachel Shadoan

* Open Sourcing Mental Illness: Ending The Stigma

An open, honest discussion of mental illness from the perspective of a web developer. We can learn to survive, cope, and thrive.
Culture
Ed Finkler

* Scottish Folk Dance: If you can follow code, you can dance!

Can you follow and write code? Do you participate in the ebb and flow of open source communities? Does pivoting those skills into a social form of exercise appeal to you? If so, then Scottish folk dancing might be for you!
Culture
Darrick Wong

* Slytherin 101: How To Win Friends and Influence People

Do you wish that you were better at getting people to do what you need them to do? Do you keep getting put in charge of things and then get stuck wondering how the heck you're supposed to get things done? Do you keep getting into conflicts with other people because of stuff you've said, and you aren't entirely sure why? Fortunately, Slytherin House has you covered. Come to this talk and learn the basics of how to hack human relationships, using the tools of cunning and ambition to achieve inter-House harmony. As long as you promise not to use these techniques to support the next Dark Lord, of course.
Culture
Denise Paolucci

* Speaker Support of Awesomeness: How I went from stage fright to stage presence and want to help others do the same.

Once upon a time, I was terrified of public speaking. I went from having stage fright to being a stage presence who speaks at conferences. I run a support group for old and new speakers called the "Tech Conf Speaker Support of Awesomeness." I want to talk about what we do, why we do it, and how well it's worked out so far. This talk is about speaking for the first time, improving your talks, and how conference organizers and attendees can help too.
Culture
Julie Pagano

* Supporting communities with Gittip

There are lots of people doing good work in the world, and while there seems to be a myriad of ways to provide financial "donations", few of them provide a way to do so in a sustainable manner. We're going to look at Gittip, a freedom loving platform to provide a sustainable, predictable income to those making the world a better place.
Culture
Paul Fenwick

* The 20,000km view: How GPS works

GPS is more than just letting your phone tell you where you are. I believe GPS is a contender for "most amazing piece of engineering in the history of humanity", and I'll show you why.
Chemistry
Jamey Sharp

* Unicorns Are People, Too: Re-Thinking Soft and Hard Skills

As developers, we tend to value hard skills that can be quantified or measured objectively. Job postings search for unicorns, but we are people first and foremost and being human isn't as easy as programming. While the code comes easily, the soft skills that make us human are complicated and difficult to get right. This talk will explore the danger of neglecting so-called "soft" skills, what we stand to lose by overvaluing technical skills, and alternatives to the hard and soft dichotomy.
Culture
Liz Abinante

* When Many Eyes Fail You: Tales from Security Standards and Open Source

It's often said that "given many eyes, all bugs are shallow" and open source proponents love to list this as a reason that open source is more secure than its closed-source relatives. While that makes a nice sound bite, the reality of security with many eyeballs doesn't fit so nicely into a tweet. This talk will explore some of the things that surprised me in going from academic security research to industry security research in open source and open standards.
Culture
Terri Oda

Favorite proposals for this user

* cassis.js: Code That Runs in both JS & PHP - Natively

This talk is about how I use language hacks to run the same code natively on PHP and Javascript (JS), which I call CASSIS for Client And Server Scripting Implementation Subset. I'll describe how I discovered CASSIS, how to use the open source library cassis.js to write middleware logic once for both client & server, and real-world use cases including where I've successfully deployed cassis.js for years (even as an essential part of my own site tantek.com).
Hacks 2014-04-12 06:57:35 +0000
Tantek Çelik

* From the Inside Out: How Self-Talk Affects Your Community

Identifying and discouraging negative self-talk is a simple thing, but it can have a huge impact on your community in a positive way. It increases self-confidence, improves morale, and generally results in happier, more productive community participants. This, in turn, will make you happy.
Culture 2014-04-04 16:50:29 +0000
Kat Toomajian

* High Failability

Want to hear real-world, sanitized tales of failed website launches? We could just talk launch success, but that's just not as interesting. Fire and brimstone with a positive spin. Educational pain.
Chemistry 2014-04-08 00:19:15 +0000
howard draper, Emily Slocombe

* How Not to Be Lonely: An Extrovert's Guide to Working Alone

I have two batteries (you may have more). My work battery governs my ability to be productive. My life battery governs my
 ability to be happy. Learning to care for my batteries was the most critical aspect of my success with remote work.
Culture 2014-04-07 15:21:44 +0000
Jeremy Flores

* How to be a functional programmer without being a jerk about it

It's OK to admit it: All your friends are coming in to work in the morning talking about that wicked sweet algorithm they wrote in like 3 lines of OCaml, and you're a little jealous. You went and downloaded haskell and started playing around and then: "OH GOD HOW DO I WRITE A LOOP WAIT WHY?". Come learn the principles of functional you can apply in any language without the condescension.
Culture 2014-04-11 13:09:12 +0000
Nathan Dotz

* How To Be A Great Developer

Being a great developer is much more than technical know-how. Empathy, communication, and reason are at least as important, but are undervalued in our industry. We'll examine the impact these skills can have and how to apply them to our work.
Culture 2014-04-11 20:18:02 +0000
Edward Finkler

* Promises Kept: The New Javascript Design Pattern

Javascript Promises are a new design pattern in javascript that is easy to use and understand but also makes your code more powerful. Learn how to get started using this design pattern and how it will clean your code and make you seem smarter.
Cooking 2014-04-04 13:35:56 +0000
Stefan Hayden

* Proposal: "I come from a Land Down Under. No, the other one. Or: Why New Zealand is a fantastic place for open sourcers"

This session is a presentation on some of the wide array of cool open source, open data, & open science things happening in New Zealand and will include discussion of functional political activism in a small parliamentary democracy, The Hobbit, mandatory minimum four-week PTO requirements, unarmed cops, no TSA, and lots of pictures of spectaculars vistas, beaches, recreational opportunities, and the basics of expatriation.
Culture 2014-04-04 02:35:38 +0000
Daniel Spector

* Rethinking the Single Page Web Application

We were promised a glorious future with RESTful APIs, clients with lighting fast JavaScript engines, and an end to sending UI from the server. Now your project is late, the technical debt is piling up, and you're thinking that hey, Rails wasn't awful. Let's talk about when it's a good idea to build a single page, client side app, and when it's not. I'll be drawing from my experience building a single-app to manage an enterprise software as a service product. Before you jumped into Backbone, Ember, or Angular, you needed to think through the APIs you have, and still had to build. You need to look at the interactions in your UI. You need to figure out where and how your users will access the application.
Cooking 2014-04-11 08:57:43 +0000
Bill Humphries

* Sane Database Change Management with Sqitch

Sqitch is the sane database schema deployment tool. It doesn't care what programming language you use, what framework, or what database engine. Its focuses on tools to facilitate iterative development and ease of deployment, and otherwise stays out of your way. This session provides a technical introduction to Sqitch, with detailed usage examples to help get you started.
Cooking 2014-04-05 23:51:09 +0000
David Wheeler

* SQL and NoSQL Data Model Optimization in Write-Optimized Databases

Though SQL and NoSQL data models are usually very different, write-optimized databases offer some similar benefits for both. I'll describe some of the background and implementation of write-optimized data structures, and we'll discuss some strategies for choosing data models to get the best performance out of them.
Chemistry 2014-04-10 20:49:14 +0000
Leif Walsh

* Unsuck Your Job

There is no reason you have to put up with a job which is unnecessarily stressful, unfulfilling, or just wrong for you. You have the power to make things better. I'm here to show you how.
Business 2014-03-27 04:10:43 +0000
VM Brasseur

* Web Design is a Process

Nobody puts IA in a corner! Web design and development does not start with Photoshop or end with a commit. It is all the stuff in between that matters. Get ready to get your hands dirty in this workshop exploring all the facets that make up the field of "web design".
Business 2014-04-05 02:22:54 +0000
Morten Rand-Hendriksen

* When Harry Met Iannis - 2014

An exploration of music composed and synthesized by open source software. This piece has been through three incarnations - 2001 (Perl and Sfront), 2004 (Lisp and MIDI) and 2009 - back to Perl and Sfront (https://soundcloud.com/znmeb/sets/when-harry-met-iannis-2009). It's time to revisit 'When Harry Met Iannis' - better algorithms, more modern languages, and more complex instruments.
Cooking 2014-04-12 06:00:39 +0000
M. Edward (Ed) Borasky

Open Source Bridge 2013

Favorite sessions for this user

* Cool Features of the Z Shell (zsh)

Z Shell is a UNIX shell with a bunch of cool features. Learn about installing and configuring zsh with some of my favorite features.
Cooking
Michael Pigg

* DIY Electric Vehicles

Everybody today has heard of electric vehicles, yet almost nobody has ever seen one, touched one, or driven one. I think this is a shame and would like to correct that. Come join me for 45 minutes of explanation and demonstration about the basics of electric vehicles from electric bicycles all the way to passenger vehicles. Building these vehicles at home is easily within the realm of anybody unafraid to pick up a few simple tools and learn a few basic concepts.
Hacks
Benjamin Kero

* DIY: Creativity and Open Source

Panelists will discuss their uses of open source tools in creative applications, from design to art to hardware.
Culture
Melissa Chavez, Sarah Sharp, Cloë Latchkey, Cameron Adamez

* FAIL is Not a Four-Letter Word

Projects fail. Companies crash and burn. Screws fall out all the time; the world is an imperfect place. Just because it happens doesn’t mean we can’t do our best to prevent it or—at the very least—to minimize the damage when it does. As a matter of fact, embracing failure can be one of the best things you do for your organization.
Culture
VM Brasseur

* FirefoxOS

FirefoxOS is Mozilla's response to the problems that it sees with the mobile space. Walled gardens, platform fragmentation, and single-purpose SDKs in non-web programming languages threaten to close off the open web from the mobile space. In this presentation I will be covering the basics of FirefoxOS, and how it is the only mobile OS that answers to nobody but you.
Chemistry
Benjamin Kero

* Human Interfaces for Geeks

As technical professionals we excel at understanding protocols, standards, file-formats, and APIs. Whenever there is a doubt as to the correct way to do things, one merely needs to read the fine manual or source code. Unfortunately the reference manual for humans was lost a long time ago, and the source code is poorly documented. We've been struggling with inter-human communication ever since. Paul Fenwick will present his findings at reverse-engineering the human communication protocol.
Culture
Paul Fenwick

* It's OK to be Average

Open Source communities are often full of "the one who invented ___" people. They've written RFCs, gotten patents, published software that's already installed on every computer you'll ever buy. It can be kind of intimidating. But there's room for more than that--and welcoming more people can improve your project exponentially!
Culture
Noirin Plunkett

* Just Don't Lick the Cookie: an open discussion about organizational dysfunction

When someone claims a task and then doesn't do anything with it, we call that "licking the cookie." Nobody in their right mind would pick up and eat the licked cookie or finish the project. In this session well talk about common forms of organizational dysfunction, and then facilitate a group discussion about working around, over, under or through organizational dysfunctions you've encountered.
Culture
Kellie Brownell, Sumana Harihareswara

* Kicking Impostor Syndrome In The Head

Impostor syndrome -- the persistent belief that any minute everyone around you is going to figure out you're not at all qualified -- happens to a majority of the tech industry; nobody talks about it, because nobody wants to be the first to admit it. This talk confronts that feeling head-on, and addresses ways to readjust your perceptions of your accomplishments to accurately reflect reality.
Culture
Denise Paolucci

* Negotiation: Because You're Worth It

There's only one person who wins when you don't negotiate, and it's not you. But, as any logician will tell you, that doesn't tell us about what happens when you do negotiate. I'm here to help!
Business
Noirin Plunkett

* No, I Won't Contribute to Your Open Source Project

The growth of the open community is inspiring. Yet despite this, most projects find it remarkably difficult to get people to contribute. Why?
Culture
VM Brasseur

* Open Sourcing Depression

In the spirit of open source, I'd like to shine a spotlight on depression. Not because it's easy, but because it's important. Mental illness affects many of us, but the stigma attached to it dissuades most people from talking about it openly. That's not how we make progress. With this talk, I want to do my part.
Culture
Edward Finkler

* PHP for Pirates: pillaging interactive debugging from Ruby and JavaScript.

It's sad that in 2013, var_dump and die are still two of the most common debugging and reflection techniques in PHP. Let's explore the state of interactive debugging in PHP, compare it with what's available in other languages, and apply this with practical tools and techniques which can be used today.
Cooking
Justin Hileman

* PostgreSQL Replication - The Most Exciting Technology on Earth

This electric discussion will journey through several available methods of replication using PostgreSQL.
Chemistry
Edward Snajder

* Robotron Autopsy: Learning About Hardware From Vintage Video Games

Studying and building hardware is easier than you think. Using software concepts as a metaphor, I will reverse-engineer the 1982 arcade game machine "Robotron: 2084" and reimplement it in modern hardware.
Hacks
Jared Boone

* Running with Scissors: Open Source Team Dynamics

Team dynamics are tricky. They're different when you're volunteering your time, when you're working for someone, or when you're trying to build something and invite someone else to build other good things too.
Culture
Amye Scavarda

* Smart Asana

Yoga returns to Open Source Bridge! Come with your stiff shoulders, sore wrists, tight hips and aching back. Leave with ideas on how to incorporate 5 minutes of practice into your busy day to care for your body and mind.
Culture
Sherri Koehler

* Switching Teams: Moving an Application from MySQL to PostgreSQL

The true life story of switching database backends in our application.
Hacks
Julie Baumler

* Teaching Robots to See With Javascript

Computer Vision, Javascript, and Flying Drones.
Hacks
Peter Braden

* Unicode Best Practices

Developing applications to handle the natural languages and written scripts of the world—or even a small handful of them—is an impressively large task. Fortunately, Unicode provides tools to do just that. It’s more than just a character set, it’s a collection of standards for working with the world’s textual data. The problem is: Unicode itself is complex!
Cooking
Nova Patch

Favorite proposals for this user

* Crash Course in Business Startup Logistics

Businesses open and close at an alarming rate, often because the people start them with a vision of a must-have product or service but without much actual business knowledge. This tutorial is for tech-minded people who have the product vision but no idea where or how to start turning it into a real business. Learn startup logistics from a fellow geek, not from a suit.
Business 2013-02-05 19:31:35 +0000
VM Brasseur

* Agile Crafting

Estimating the time a project will take is pretty much the hardest thing in software, and I don't think that's any different for any other crafting deliverable. Of course, sometimes we have done something so often that we KNOW it takes 50 minutes to make a batch of raspberry jam, but that's not the same as estimation. So if we can't rely on our own estimation, or that of others, what can we do? We can timebox from the other direction. Instead of trying to figure out how long something will take, we can decide how long we have to spend on it. After all, you are the boss of your creative experiences. If you don't deliver on time, it's disappointing, but probably not the end of your career.
Hacks 2013-03-01 20:20:52 +0000
Heidi Waterhouse

* Conference Presentation Mind Control

Have you been at a talk which sounded great on paper, but was lackluster in delivery? Have you discovered that some presenters can seem to make *anything* interesting? Do you want to know how to hack audiences to convince them that your talk is *freakin' amazing* even though it's content-challenged? Want to use your conference presentation skills to kickstart your career in world domination? BYO tinfoil hat.
Hacks 2013-03-10 05:06:32 +0000
Paul Fenwick

* Emotional barriers to getting stuff done

Sometimes you know exactly how to solve a problem, but yet you can't get started. Why is this, and what can you do about it.
Chemistry 2013-03-24 01:42:00 +0000
Daniel Johnson

* Hacking Conference Tshirts

Know how you get all those great free tshirts at conferences? Don't you hate how they never seem to fit your feminine figure? Or worse yet, all that's left is sizes that are too big or too small! This talk will show easy modifications and alternative uses for those awesome conference tshirts!
Hacks 2013-02-08 17:30:25 +0000
Augustina Blair

* Janus wasn’t a bad guy: Solving real problems using a key-value store inside a relational database.

We demonstrate how we used hstore inside a Postgres database to elegantly solve the problem of generating solid business-intelligence from the dregs of emailed PDF and Excel files.
Chemistry 2013-03-11 20:18:46 +0000
Laurie Kemmerer, Dave Miller, Ravi Gadad

* Pricing: Uncensored

Pricing is an issue with which even non-profits need to wrestle. It's a necessity for a healthy, growing business. There is no shame in pricing, nor in understanding its principles and how to do it correctly, respecting everyone's needs and boundaries.
Business 2013-02-05 19:48:19 +0000
VM Brasseur

* Pythonic Andragogy (Python for Adults)

You've heard of kids using turtle graphics. Lets talk about "tractor graphics" in a hypothetical Python course from a possible future.
Culture 2013-03-20 21:07:01 +0000
Kirby Urner

* Sane Database Change Management with Sqitch

Database change management has always sucked. This talk introduces Sqitch, the SQL change management application that doesn’t suck. Come see how it works, learn the few simple rules you need to get the most out of it, and liberate yourself from the suckitude.
Cooking 2013-03-22 06:48:01 +0000
David Wheeler

* Tech, Bikes, Transit & Lifestyle Options to improve your Programming

I'll be diving deep to discuss the benefits of living well to do better programming. I'll talk about the statistics and data behind dropping the auto-dependent mindset and stepping into the world of cycling, meetups, urban living, clean eating and ways to dramatically improve your innovation, entrepreneurial activities and why these things are connected. As I like to say, "How to get and stay at 100%."
Culture 2013-01-17 22:11:34 +0000
Adron Hall

* The Case for Everyday Crypto

Personal encryption is dearly needed in an increasingly surveilled world. I will talk about the user experience problems and lack of education that prevent widespread adoption and habit-forming of secure communication and circumvention software tools.
Culture 2013-03-30 23:53:18 +0000
Wesley Chen

* Unicode Regular Expressions

Modern regular expression engines have been rapidly adding new features for matching and parsing Unicode strings, providing powerful new tools to add to your toolkit.
Chemistry 2013-03-10 07:59:06 +0000
Nova Patch

* What Science Fiction Can Teach Us About Building Communities

Helpful tips about participating in and building open source communities as told through examples of what we can learn about communities from science fiction.
Culture 2013-03-13 15:11:44 +0000
Dawn Foster

* Working the System: Secrets of a Hiring Manager

There's no nice way to say it: Job hunting sucks. To succeed you need diligence, strategy and intel on your opponent. Come learn the tech hiring process from the point of view of the person on the other side of the table: the hiring manager.
Business 2013-02-05 19:45:52 +0000
VM Brasseur

Open Source Bridge 2010

Favorite sessions for this user

* Connecting to Web Services on Android

This presentation will show how to connect to REST-based web services from an Android application. We'll discuss HTTP programming as well as XML and JSON libraries. This presentation will include a live demo of an Android application.
Cooking
Sean Sullivan

* Considering in-house automated web testing?

Interested in setting up your own test automation infrastructure? This is what you need to know.
Chemistry
Adam Christian

* Geek Choir

This is exactly what it looks like: We're going to make you sing. ;)
Culture
Michael Alan Brewer

* Give a Great Tech Talk

Why do so many technical presentations suck? Make sure that yours doesn't. Josh Berkus and Ian Dees will show you how to share your ideas with your audience by speaking effectively and (when the situation warrants it) showing your code.
Culture
Josh Berkus, Ian Dees

* Hacking Space Exploration

From creating remote-sensing CubeSats to analyzing aerogel: how the public is hacking into open source space exploration.
Culture
Ariel Waldman

* Housetruck: Building a Victorian RV

As a "software person," I found the hard technologies of building with steel and wood made for a very different creative and hacking process. At the same time, I discovered many parallels to software development, embedded hardware, and even open-source philosophies.
Hacks
John Labovitz

* Introduction to PostgreSQL

Interested in using PostgreSQL for you next project, or migrating to it? This tutorial will go over the basics of PostgreSQL administration and database application design.
Cooking
Josh Berkus, Christophe Pettus

* Making Drupal Go Fast with Varnish and Pressflow

You've launched your new web site and it's starting to get some attention. You've tuned your database and optimized your HTTP daemon, but what if it's not enough to keep up with all the hits you're getting? We'd like to introduce you to your two new best friends: Varnish and Pressflow.
Cooking
Greg Lund-Chaix, Rudy Grigar

* Making your information online findable

It's not enough to have a website. You need to have your website (and your business) be findable, and not drive normal people (eg, everyone but you and your web designer) nuts. And you need to make sure that Google has it right. Here's how.
Chemistry
VJ Beauchamp

* Move Your Asana

This yoga session is of benefit to anyone who sits and works on computers a lot. Breathing exercises and physical postures that can be done anytime to help maintain a healthy body and clear mind will be taught. Suggestions will be included for how to modify stretches to protect injuries and provide gentle opening.
Culture
Sherri Koehler

* Practical Facebook stalking with Open Source tools

Facebook are full of juicy information about your friends and strangers alike! Learn how to use some simple open source tools and techniques to learn more about them.
Hacks
Paul Fenwick

* Professional JavaScript

JavaScript is a unique and powerful language. Its ubiquity in the browser and its elegant concurrency model make JavaScript an ideal tool in a number of situations. Learn about the best ways to use and to understand this language from a full-time JavaScript professional.
Chemistry
Jesse Hallett

* Relational vs. Non-Relational

What kind of database do you need? Thanks to new database projects like CouchDB, TokyoCabinet, Solr and others, there are more non-relational database options available than ever for developers. Yet good information on how to choose what kind of database you need is still scarce. We'll cure that in this talk.
Cooking
Josh Berkus

* SELECT * FROM Internet Using YQL

Treating the internet and all its sources as a database, YQL seeks to allow developers to explore government, social, api and all other external data in a standardized way. Further allowing developers to manipulate this data and mash different sources together, YQL works to open up the web and all its sources.
Chemistry
Jonathan LeBlanc

* Speeding up your PHP Application

Is your Wordpress site too slow? What's this HipHop PHP thing? How do I write really fast PHP apps? Drop by to get the answers to these questions.
Hacks
Rasmus Lerdorf

* Sphinx - the ultimate tool for documenting your software project

Open source software projects can succeed or fail based on their documentation. Thanks to Sphinx, open source developers now have a "documentation framework" that provides convenient indexing and automatic syntax highlighting, integrates your documentation with your code, and can automatically generate a beautiful manual as a PDF document.
Cooking
Nate Aune

* The $2 computer: ultraconstrained devices do your bidding

"Do you watch television? Is your furnace loud? Do you have $2?" My 7-year-old's marketing suggestions aside, building custom gadgets to improve your life is remarkably simple, and I'll prove it by building something on stage that you can duplicate at home.
Hacks
David Hollingsworth

* The Fine Line Between Creepy and Fun

Social software is kind of a big deal right now. In the open-source spirit of transparency and dissection, let's talk about what makes social technology creepy, what makes it fun, and how to hack things to maximize your desired outcome.
Hacks
Audrey Eschright

* Your Internets are Leaking

Using your computer on a public network is like having a conversation on a city bus: people you don't know can hear everything you say. They'll probably be polite and ignore you, but you still might not want to shout out your credit card number. Yet this is what your computer does. All the time. And you don't know it.
Cooking
Reid Beels, Michael Schwern

Open Source Bridge 2009

Favorite sessions for this user

* Advanced Git tutorial: Not your average VCS.

Do you know the basics of Git but wonder what all the hype is about? Do you want the ultimate control over your Git history? This tutorial will walk you through the basics of committing changes before diving into the more advanced and "dangerous" Git commands.
Cooking
Sarah Sharp

* Building a SQL Database That Works

As a developer, what you really need are some simple recipes for how to think about designing your SQL databases so that they are simple, maintainable, expandable and easy to troubleshoot.
Cooking
Josh Berkus

* Building Open Source Communities in Higher Education

Learning how Open source communities work is an important skill in today's job market, but many college students fail to join projects. Come learn how the School of EECS at Oregon State University is working to motivate students, and help them overcome the barriers of joining open source projects through Beaversource.
Culture
Jose Cedeno, Eric Betts, Justin Gallardo

* Get Off Your Asana and Move!

This is a yoga workshop for anyone who sits and works on computers a lot. You will learn breathing exercises and physical postures that can be done at anytime to help maintain a healthy body and clear mind. Suggestions will be included for how to modify stretches to protect injuries and provide gentle opening.
Culture
Sherri Koehler

* My Grand Experiment: A Portland Women-focused Tech Group.

The idea for Code-n-Splode grew out of the Women in Open Source BOF at OSCON 2007. I'll talk about my original reasons for starting a women-friendly tech group, how the group is evolving, and what I've learned.
Culture
gabrielle roth

* Open Source Library Software: Empowering Libraries - Creating Opportunities

The closed, proprietary, integrated library systems (ILS) of the last decade have left libraries with no control over features, enhancements, hardware platforms, or support options resulting in an attitude of “learned helplessness” when it comes to their ILS. Open Source Library Systems (OSLS) offer opportunities to empower libraries and library staff to create new kinds of collaborative support and development environments. This session uses activities that will help participants understand (from the inside) the cultural shift that needs to happen so they can take advantage of their participation in this Open Source project and not just remain passive bystanders.
Culture
Lori Ayre

* PHP - Architecting and Profiling for performance

A look at efficient PHP development through proper architecture and profiling tools.
Chemistry
Rasmus Lerdorf

* Remember Tcl/ Tk? Grandpa might be old, but he can still kick your ass!

Rumors of its senescence -- at least lack of stylishness -- to the contrary, Tcl/Tk is still one of the best scripting environments around. I will show you why.
Hacks
Webb Sprague