Sam Scott's favorites

Open Source Bridge 2017

Favorite sessions for this user

* Building #Resist at Meetup: Actual Corporate Activism in the Age of Trump

Learn how Meetup made the decision to create #Resist, a free network of over 1000 Meetups worldwide that anyone could organize with or join, and the questions we had to ask about how a private company could help self-empower the public in an actual way.
Activism
Yanyi .

* Futel: The Network We Deserve

Futel has provided free public telephone service, telephone-mediated art, and live human interaction for several years, and was recognized as Portland's most prolific payphone installer of 2016. Now that we are finally living in the cyberpunk dystopia promised in the 80s, we are poised to seize this moment.
Activism
Karl Anderson

* Grassroots activism is hard. Can open source help?

Grassroots activists have to deal with many challenges - including the tools they’re using. Sounds like a great opportunity for open source! This session will survey progressive and transpartisan grassroots activists’ needs and today’s solutions (including techniques that work for explicitly intersectional groups), look at some existing open-source offerings and how they could evolve to better meet grassroots activists’ needs, and identify future directions that could be even more impactful.
Activism
Jon Pincus

* How Can I Contribute?

This talk is for you, the documentarian, developer, student, or community member wondering what you can contribute to open source and how to get started. Lucy Wyman discusses several ways open source projects need your help, what to look for in a project you're contributing to, and some first steps to making your first pull request.
Culture
Lucy Wyman

* How To Mentor Humans

I feel passionately that women and epecially minority women in tech need mentors and that those already in tech have a duty to step up for them, even though it means getting out of their comfort zone. How do you mentor minorities? How do you mentor anyone? With kindness and respect.
Culture
Letta Raven

* It Can't Happen Here: But what if it does? Open-source alternative communication infrastructure

This talk will focus on what happens when the internet infrastructure we know and love goes down - by natural disaster or human-instigated shutdown (think Mubarak in Egypt during the Arab Spring).
Activism
jenka soderberg

* Morning Keynote — Doing away with (bad) shibboleths

The developer community has many ways of determining who belongs and who doesn’t. Some of these are helpful, but others intimidate beginners who could go on to be good developers. This talk will provide a framework for differentiation between the good and the bad.
Activism
Walé Ogundipé

* Morning Keynote — Fake Science! Sad! A case study of the perils of Open Data

Open source allows anyone to use their skills to change the world--for better or for worse. In an era where the phrase "Fake News!" echoes from the highest office of the land, we have to cast a critical eye on the works that we promote and participate in. Open Data is no exception, and the use of Open Data to generate Fake Analyses is a real issue that can undermine social progress.
Activism
Emily Gorcenski

* Open Source Security for Activists: Changing the world and staying safe

Staying safe in dangerous times is no easy task, especially when you're speaking the truth to power. Despite giving a voice to millions, the internet is now also a place of danger for those who try to use it to amplify those voices and make them heard. I'll be talking about by my experiences as a Nonprofit Security Advisor using Open Source tools and knowledge to help keep activists safe at the coalface.
Activism
Chris Daley

* Out of the Game: How Apps Fail Oppressed Users (and what you can do to help)

Apps and websites routinely expose user information in service of social and interactive goals. But what happens when your user has a stalker? Many of these services will compromise the safety of users who are already at risk. Making things worse, some developers resist making changes, with justifications such as "If someone's in that much danger, they shouldn't be doing anything online," and "It's basically impossible to defend against a state actor." This overview will help developers take the risk factors into account, and make development decisions that puts control back into the hands of the users. There's no way to perfectly remove the risk of going online if you're in danger, but people will go online anyway. Many more users at risk are facing technically naive attackers than are facing highly skilled attackers such as state actors.
Activism
Alex Byrne, Azure Lunatic

* Serving social spaces

Shared application servers are a vital building block for creating resilient information networks. Recent advances have made them dramatically easier to deploy and maintain in your home/workplace/community. Come for a tour, stay for a deep dive.
Activism
Eric Drechsel

* Unionizing Tech: Everybody needs a union

The Open Source Movement has a few defining traits, such as the the do-it-yourself, stick-it-to-the-man scrappiness; the caring about the people around us and their experience with the software or workplace; and, the way it is forever adaptable to the needs of the situation. Open source and unions have a lot in common - lets get started unionizing open source shops!
Culture
Sam Scott

* Writing Inclusively about Technology Topics

Based on The Responsible Communication Style Guide, this workshop is an introduction to the concepts in the style guide. It also covers how a style guide can be an effective part of the workflow when creating and promoting technology projects (including open source).
Culture
Thursday Bram

Favorite proposals for this user

* Importance of communication (Effective Communication) in Open Source communities

Open Source communities are excellent example of most diverse and globally spread work-space. Although, this is a major plus and feels amazing to work in such a diverse culture, but at the same time we need to face the challenge of accurate communication.
Culture 2017-04-06 06:34:24 +0000
Amita Sharma

Open Source Bridge 2016

Favorite sessions for this user

* Brooks Law & Open Source: Is Community-Driven Software Doomed?

One measure of health in open source projects is a growing contributor community. In 1975, Fred Brooks published The Mythical Man-Month, in which he noted that adding manpower to projects slows the release of software. If Brooks’ Law holds true, are growing open source projects doomed to fail? Or can we reconcile the ideas that more contributors are both beneficial and detrimental?
Culture
Jason Yee

* Building a Life with WordPress

If you're dying to stick it to the man, or just looking to make extra money on the side, this talk is for you. We'll explore ways you can leverage the most popular CMS on the planet to start or grow an online business.
Business
Kronda Adair

* Corporate Open Source Fail

What makes companies with good intentions fail so miserably at open source? How can we (as engineers and managers) influence our bosses to "do the right thing"?
Business
Sarah Sharp

* Creating a Third Wave of Free/Open Source Software

The free/open source software movement is over thirty years old, and has gone through a number of changes in that time, spawning projects large and small (including OpenConferenceWare, which runs this site!). If Free Software is the first generation, and Open Source is the second, current efforts toward creating an inclusive and sustainable world make up a third generation that we can start to form into a broader plan.
Culture
Audrey Eschright

* Demystifying Regular Expressions

Long ago, in the early ages of computerdom, a language was formed from the primordial fires of Tartarus. The language would bind the spells of textual strings and forever control them: The Regular Expression. How about an interactive workshop for acolytes who wish to command this strong magic?
Practice
Howard Abrams

* Exploring Mental Illness With Open Source

Julia Nguyen leads if me, an app to share mental health experiences with loved ones. In doing so, she has explored her insecurities with mental illness, learned how to engage diverse contributors, and developed better software practices with Ruby on Rails and JavaScript. She’ll share the lessons she has learned from transforming a passion project into an open source project. Inclusion takes on many forms in an open source project, including supporting contributors from all types of backgrounds, being empathetic to their project goals, and trusting them to take lead. As a mental health project, if me must also accommodate its contributors who face their own mental health challenges. All open source projects should do the same. Managing people is just as important as managing technical contributions in software.
Culture
Julia Nguyen

* Free Culture in an Expensive World

Money is a common worry, inside the open source community and out, but we often feel uncomfortable discussing it. We’ll talk about why that is and how our social norms around money impact who participates in open source and how they do so. The heart of this talk will be a series of case studies based on interviews with community members covering various economic models for open source, including worker co-ops, grant-funded and academic projects, for-profit business models, crowdfunding campaigns, and all-volunteer projects. We’ll explore the sustainability of each model as well as how they deal with the social pressures outlined in the first part of the talk.
Business
Shauna Gordon-McKeon

* More Than Binary: Inclusive Gender Collection and You

Many people identify their gender in many ways. So why do we build systems to capture accurate gender information with a dropdown that only lists “male” and “female”? This talk covers why you might want to consider alternative ways of selecting gender for your users, a brief overview of the current best practices, the case study of the decisions I made when creating my open source project Gender Amender (a library you can help work on right now!), and why more work needs to be done. I'd also like to facilitate a short discussion during the time slot, so that we can share varied perspectives on how to improve the entire process of gender collection, and articulate the lenses through which we can and should view gender (e.g. “what are some other data structures we could use to capture gender identity information?”).
Practice
Anne DeCusatis

* Open Source is Key for Innovating Pedagogy and Curricula

This talk will discuss how a closed loop in education—across all grade levels and disciplines—contributes to the stagnation of a profession and how an open source approach and platform is necessary to break the inward cycle of our current pedagogy. It will also show examples of collaboration in the creation of curricula leading to the generation of new, innovative pedagogy and review current methods for educators to open source and call for new methods and platforms to aid educators.
Culture
Gary Rozanc

* Open Source is People

For those who want to do more than just code, this talk will show you 8 ways I have contributed without opening up Vim once.
Culture
Justin Dorfman

* Python setup help for "Readable Regular Expressions: A Hands-On Workshop"

This is an open session for people to get help setting up Python to prepare for the "Readable Regular Expressions: A Hands-On Workshop" longform session the next day.
Practice
Trey Hunner

* Readable Regular Expressions: A Hands-On Workshop

What are regular expressions, what are they useful for, and why are they so hard to read? We'll learn what regular expressions are good for, how to make our own regular expressions, and how to make our regular expressions friendly and readable (yes it's possible... sometimes).
Practice
Trey Hunner

* Sparkle security

"Agent Sparkle, you have been recruited as a security expert to use your skills to protect the kingdom of Project Rainbow. You might not feel qualified yet, but Project Rainbow has great faith in your ability to learn." Web security is perhaps one of most fun types of computer security to master: exploits can be constructed quickly and without many tools. But sadly, while there are many tutorials, they simply don't have enough rainbows and sparkles and the practice exploits tend to focus on the basics without flourishes. Project Sparkle is a set of "training missions" designed to make learning web security more kid-friendly, but we think the audience of Open Source Bridge will also enjoy exploiting the web to add more rainbows and sparkles!
Practice
Terri Oda

* What We Talk About When We Talk About Code

Programming and open source have plenty of specific jargon to learn. How do we make sure we're not pushing away contributors with it?
Culture
Zoe Landon

Favorite proposals for this user

* Fail Early, Fail Often, Fail Well

If failure is inevitable, why aren't we taught how to cope with it? In this talk I outline 10 types of failure to avoid and detail a framework for navigating recovery from failures large and small.
Business 2016-04-11 00:59:34 +0000
Josh Simmons

Open Source Bridge 2015

Favorite sessions for this user

* "A huge green fierce snake bars the way!"; or, Building a Text Adventure Game in Python

Have you ever wanted to vanquish a dragon with your bare hands? First step is making a world where you can. In this talk, I'll give you the blueprints for my Python text adventure engine, as well as some recipes for making things in a text-only world.
Cooking
Katie Silverio

* Hello, my name is __________.

Our personal identity is core to how we perceive ourselves and wish to be seen. All too often, however, applications, databases, and user interfaces are not designed to fully support the diversity of personal and social identities expressed throughout the world.
Cooking
Nova Patch

* HTTP Can Do That?!

I have explored weird corners of HTTP -- malformed requests that try to trick a site admin into clicking spam links in 404 logs, an API that responds to POST but not GET, and more. In this talk I'll walk you through those (using Python, netcat, and other tools you might have lying around the house).
Hacks
Sumana Harihareswara

* Male/Female/Othered: Implementing Gender-Inclusiveness in User Data Collection

You want to gather information about your users that you can use to improve their experience and yours. They want their identities to be acknowledged and treated with respect. This talk is about meeting both needs: How to ask about gender in ways that welcome the diversity of reality while still being able to analyze the data you get back. We'll discuss the nature of that challenge, how some major websites address it, and example solutions for different scenarios.
Culture
Finn Ellis, Jonathan Harker

* Morning Keynote — Put Up or Shut Up: An Open Letter to Tech Companies Seeking Diverse Teams

People from marginalized communities struggle to break into tech, clawing our way through a racist, sexist, classist, ableist system only to be fired, quit or just suffer in misery. I’ll explore what it really takes to create a workplace that is truly welcoming of everyone.
Culture
Kronda Adair

* Open Source your Circuit Design with KiCAD

I learned to design circuits in Eagle because at the time there were no good, free, open source alternatives but I would argue that's changed. Let's talk about why KiCAD might be the CAD program you're looking for and do a whirlwind tour of the current state of KiCAD tools and community.
Chemistry
Jenner Hanni

* Through the Warp Zone: Hacking Super Mario Brothers

Discover new worlds in Super Mario Brothers even the creators never saw!
Hacks
Emily St., Shawna Scott

Favorite proposals for this user

* Objectivity is a Myth: Your Data is Not Objective and Neither Are You

Data is often treated as an impartial representation of reality--an unbiased delivery mechanism for "ground truth". Data collection, however, is designed by people, whose knowledge and beliefs influence the design decisions they make. How does that impact what we think we know, and how can we adapt our processes to account for it?
Culture 2015-03-08 01:37:51 +0000
Rachel Shadoan

* The Ethics Of Software Development

The software we build has an impact on millions of people, and while it can be empowering for many, it is often disempowering for many others. Many times we as developers don't really think through these issues, and that is really a shame because the work we do has enormous impact on people's lives, and that impact is very often in opposition to a lot of the values that we hold dear. This session will talk through some of these issues, and explain why it is so important that we think about how we affect the world, and try to frame our work in a way that meshes well with our own values.
Culture 2015-02-18 19:42:28 +0000
Greg Dunlap

* You Should Speak

Have you ever thought about speaking at a conference, then come up with some excuse like "I don't know enough", "I'm scared of public speaking", or "I don't know where to apply"? Come to this talk to learn how to combine the open source tools and technolgies which solve all of those problems and more!
Cooking 2015-03-15 03:17:15 +0000
E. Dunham