Meli Lewis's favorites

Favorite sessions for this user

* How the Internet Works

The Internet runs the world; it connects our devices, powers our businesses, and even talks to our thermostats. But how does it all happen? We will follow an adventurous young web browser from the moment a hapless user presses "enter" and witness the trials and tribulations of many packets. Ride alongside the most fearsome syscalls as we learn how the Internet works!
Chemistry
Noah Kantrowitz

* Humanising Math and Physics on Computer Science

There are some myths around Science - it's boring, useless, difficult. Many of them are heard while we are young, and many people tend to take then for the entire life. Science is very important, specially on Computer Science and Engineering, for building the basis of our logical thinking.
Culture
Hanneli Tavante

* Using Julia & D3 to analyse web performance data

If you've always wanted to play around with D3 or Julia, or both, this talk will get you up to speed very quickly. Using web performance data as the vehicle, and an aim to extract meaningful information from it, we will explore both Julia and D3 and come up with some fun visualizations that may not be possible using only one of these tools.
Chemistry
Philip Tellis

Favorite proposals for this user

* Alice and Bob Are Really Confused

Journalists, activists, artists, business owners and other fine folks in New York City are asked to install PGP. You won't believe what happens next.
Culture 2015-03-15 00:29:32 +0000
David Huerta

* How to be a maker ? - An introduction to Arduino and Raspberry Pi

The session will deal with basics of Arduino and Raspberry Pi and audience need not be a hardware geek.
Hacks 2015-03-13 09:16:47 +0000
Nidhiya V Raj

* Modular SQL

Sometimes, one can get lost in a jungle of SQL code; in this session, we'll go over how to build queries with a more modular design, testing components as they go, and building complex functionality from simpler SQL blocks.
Cooking 2015-03-08 05:42:55 +0000
Michael Alan Brewer

* Objectivity is a Myth: Your Data is Not Objective and Neither Are You

Data is often treated as an impartial representation of reality--an unbiased delivery mechanism for "ground truth". Data collection, however, is designed by people, whose knowledge and beliefs influence the design decisions they make. How does that impact what we think we know, and how can we adapt our processes to account for it?
Culture 2015-03-08 01:37:51 +0000
Rachel Shadoan