Emma Humphries's favorites

Open Source Bridge 2016

Favorite sessions for this user

* Accidental Developer Evangelism

Learn how to organize community events and share your ideas with the open-source community AFK!
Culture
Katherine Fellows

* Behind Closed Doors: Managing Passwords in a Dangerous World

A modern application has a lot of passwords and keys floating around. Encryption keys, database passwords, and API credentials; often typed in to text files and forgotten. Fortunately a new wave of tools are emerging to help manage, update, and audit these secrets. Come learn how to avoid being the next TechCrunch headline.
Practice
Noah Kantrowitz

* Hard Problems in Terms of Service Enforcement

When you run an online service, you always hope you won't have to deal with abuse. But it's inevitable, and many situations aren't clear-cut as you might wish. Some examples of abuse are obvious, but this talk explores the grey areas and messy questions: what content should you consider a violation of your Terms of Service, and how do you handle it when it's reported to you?
Culture
Denise Paolucci

* Librarians and Open Source: We Need Code, Too!

Getting people started is easy. Sustaining people through is not. Let's talk about the ways the Open Source community can help people beyond the beginning steps, in the context of public library programming and staff development.
Culture
Alex Byrne

* More Than Binary: Inclusive Gender Collection and You

Many people identify their gender in many ways. So why do we build systems to capture accurate gender information with a dropdown that only lists “male” and “female”? This talk covers why you might want to consider alternative ways of selecting gender for your users, a brief overview of the current best practices, the case study of the decisions I made when creating my open source project Gender Amender (a library you can help work on right now!), and why more work needs to be done. I'd also like to facilitate a short discussion during the time slot, so that we can share varied perspectives on how to improve the entire process of gender collection, and articulate the lenses through which we can and should view gender (e.g. “what are some other data structures we could use to capture gender identity information?”).
Practice
Anne DeCusatis

* Open Source is People

For those who want to do more than just code, this talk will show you 8 ways I have contributed without opening up Vim once.
Culture
Justin Dorfman

* The Folk Knowledge of Bugzilla

It's good to know if a bug is a regression, and if I want to mark a bug as a regression, there's a keyword for that. (searches on regression keyword.) But there's also a whiteboard tag for that (searches on whiteboard tags containing 'regression'.) Oh dear, and let me unique that out and there's how many ways to say "this is a regression." If you're a release manager, how do you find out what bugs may be regressions and that you want to follow up on with your engineering leads?
Practice
Emma Humphries

* Unraveling the Masculinization of Technology

Have you ever wondered where the perception that technology is a masculine pursuit comes from? Or why we have to explain that, "no really, women are interested in computers too"?
Culture
Audrey Eschright

* Welcoming Communities

A lot of people enjoy contributing to Open Source projects. And Open Source projects love contributions. And yet I keep seeing newcomers struggling to contribute and project maintainers struggling to find contributors. What’s the catch? There is a gap. A gap between the desire to contribute to a community and the ability to find one. A gap between what contributions are welcome, and what people think is wanted. A gap between what people wish they could contribute, but don’t know how, or are afraid to try. In this talk, I’ll share our learning from building the Hoodie Community, which is recognized as one of the most Open Source’s most diverse and inclusive.
Culture
Gregor Martynus

* Wiping Away the (Bad) Lines in the Sand in the Software Developer Community

Think of a shibboleth as a proverbial line in the sand that determines who belongs and who is an outsider. There are a lot of arbitrary shibboleths in programming. Text editors (emacs vs. vim vs. sublime), paradigms (object-oriented vs. functional), languages (everyone vs Java), type systems, are all topics of… to put it lightly, “vigorous conversation.” In set theory terms, the developer community does not do enough to encourage seeing different developer groups as unions instead of intersections. To a newcomer, this situation sets up too much of a danger of alienation. If someone makes fun of the language that you use to learn how to code, then you’re less likely to want to keep learning.
Culture
Wale O.

* Yelling As A Service: Adventures in Unofficial QA

What goes into making a helpful bug report, if you're not even given access to the repository? Why should you, the user, report bugs? How do you navigate a series of gatekeepers who don't want to acknowledge your bugs? How do you maintain a good relationship with people in charge of a project that's screwing up your whole life?
Practice
Azure Lunatic

Favorite proposals for this user

* Building community with Twitter chats

The team building community around a book called The Open Organization wanted to see how social media could enhance our efforts. We investigated and successfully used Twitter chats as a way to continue conversation and dialog around what it means to be an open leader. Now it's time to share what we've learned so you can do the same thing for your community.
Practice 2016-03-18 22:14:24 +0000
Jason Hibbets

* Debugging Diversity

Despite the media attention given to the diversity in tech problem, many technology practitioners don't see how a lack of diversity affects their daily life. So, it is not surprising that they neither understand the magnitude of the problem nor how they can fix it. However, the principles and language of debugging, something technology practitioners understand well, can be used to help them understand diversity and their role in solving the problem. So, technologists already have a set of terms that they can use to tackle diversity. They just need to know how to apply those terms in order to effect positive change. These terms are expected behavior, tracing, refactoring, and sample code.
Culture 2016-03-16 19:25:11 +0000
Anjuan Simmons

* Even Cowboy Coders Get the Site Reliability Blues

The principles behind building reliable distributed systems and gracefully managing changes in them turn out to look a lot like the principles behind building psychologically safe communities. In this talk, I'll explain some of the basic principles behind site reliability engineering and how they relate to feminist and social justice ideas. This talk assumes no prior knowledge of site reliability engineering.
Culture 2016-04-19 22:32:28 +0000
Tim Chevalier

* Open source all the cities

Open source has transformed software development, now it's starting to change other parts of the world we live in. Not only is open source transforming our businesses and education systems, it's a key component to changing citizen participation in government. Creating a better citizen experience starts with the open source way. You'll learn about the five principles of an open source city and hear stories that take you from civic hacking to a government-focused unconference called CityCamp.
Practice 2016-03-18 22:09:03 +0000
Jason Hibbets

* Open Source Fan Service

What can you do when someone submits a bad patch to your project? To begin, we have to understand why people hunger to contribute code: they're fans. You hurt fans' feelings when you reject their patches, but you hurt your project if you accept them. You can get out of this bind! Give your fans other ways to be recognized. Showcase their plugins in your project’s wiki, or rewrite their patches while giving them credit, or feature their related projects on your site.
Culture 2016-03-26 21:59:46 +0000
A. Jesse Jiryu Davis

* Open Source Your Ideas: Why You Should Keep A Blog

Blogging is a great way for developers to share with the community the kind of things they've been learning and working on. By keeping a regularly updated blog, we force ourselves to continually evaluate the things we're learning, while sharing these ideas with the community at large.
Culture 2016-03-27 23:52:56 +0000
Andrew Pierce

* The Wikipedia Asian Month: how we collaborated our way to one of the biggest online Wikipedia edit-a-thons ever

In November 2015, Wikimedia communities across Asia and the world set off on what would become one of the biggest online Wikipedia edit-a-thons ever: the Wikipedia Asian Month (WAM). Managing such a huge project though, especially with people from all over the world participating, is a big challenge. This presentation looks at how we did it, what we're doing now, and how your collaboration, online project or community can benefit from our experiences.
Practice 2016-04-13 09:19:30 +0000
Josh Lim

* Working with TRIBAL GOVERNMENTS, ENVIRONMENTAL ACTIVISTS AND DECOLONIZING OPEN SOURCING

How to gain more support by decolonizing your projects by deconstructing networking with activists in Tribal Communities and other Environmental Justice groups...
Culture 2016-04-13 04:21:21 +0000
olivia hart

Open Source Bridge 2015

Favorite sessions for this user

* Building Diverse Social Networks

While only a handful of social networks like Dreamwidth and Quirell explicitly prioritize diversity, there are plenty of lessons to learn about what to do — and what not to do — from Facebook, Twitter, and others. Best practices include counter-oppressive politics, embedded in the community guidelines and norms; and the right tools, technologies, and policies. This session will look at what does and doesn't work in a variety of online environments.
Culture
Jon Pincus, Lynn Cyrin

* Cassandra at the Keyboard: Whistleblowing at all scales

What do you do if you see something that needs change in your organization. How do you "say something" for your "see something"? What are the benefits and drawbacks of even minor whistleblowing?
Culture
Heidi Waterhouse

* Community Moderation: you can't always halt a flamewar with one raised eyebrow (but it rarely hurts to try)

Even in an email list, moderation isn't limited to setting the entire email list to require approval before messages are posted. You can create rules which reflect the culture you'd like to see, and call attention to ways that the community differs from that culture. You can point out when a particular post doesn't fit with that culture -- publicly or privately, whichever you think will do the most good. You can point out when a particular post exemplifies something great about the culture. You can point out particular rules that everyone needs to keep abiding by, without calling out a specific post. If a specific person, or a specific handful of people, have trouble with the rules, you could put them in particular on moderated posting for some time. If someone keeps breaking the rules, that person is a good candidate for being removed entirely. There are limits to what the rest of the community and the moderators should have to deal with, even though your project may choose to keep that as a last resort. Sometimes the problem can be solved by redirection. If the main email list is getting cluttered with off-topic posts, consider a just-for-fun or off-topic side list to divert threads to once they wander off code and into sports, kittens, beer, or knitting. It's easier to say "You shouldn't do that here" than "You shouldn't do that, period"; it's even easier to say "You shouldn't do that here, but it would be great right over there." And most of us could use a sports, kittens, beer, or knitting break every now and then.
Culture
Azure Lunatic

* Desigining for Renaming

Renaming yourself is never easy. In Santa Clara County in the State of California, to file a petition to change one's name costs over $400, and may take six months or more. Then one must change one's name (and possibly one's gender marker) on the dozens of sites and services one uses. On many sites, that's easy, I go to preferences and edit my name. But then the site addresses me as "Mr. Emma Humphries," oh really? Other systems will correctly greet me as "Emma" when I log in. But still call me by $DEAD_NAME when they send an email. This brings us to the first best practice: When I change my name in one place, change it in all the places.
Culture
Emma Humphries

* Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Pelican: A Comparison of Static Site Generators

Want to make a static site or blog, but not sure where to start? Tired of using Wordpress and looking for something better? This talk will get into the nitty-gritty details of how Jekyll and Pelican -- two popular static site generators -- work, and explain how to choose which is best for your project. Using examples you can clone from github, we'll cover the pros and cons of both SSGs, discuss things that neither does well, and give you a better idea of how to get your site up and running (with an open source tool!).
Chemistry
Lucy Wyman

* Fear Driven Development

Have you ever not made a much-needed change because you were afraid of breaking something? Caution is wise, but too much fear can leave even the most agile of software organizations with a crippling aversion to change. This talk will discuss what makes us scared, why it hurts us, and my experiences helping a team I managed get rid of some of our fears.
Culture
Ryan Kennedy

* Good Enough Voter Verification & Other Identity Architecture Schemes for Online Communities

This talk is a deep dive into considerations for Identity Architecture for online communities. It's most specifically applications for political action, civic engagement, or virtual nations. I'll talk about pragmatic solutions for voter verification using the state voter registration database, schemes for peer to peer authentication, offline/online identification, Impartial Identity Architecture to control conflict, and more. The discussion is high level and appropriate for beginners, but there will be links to code and big ideas.
Culture
Ele Mooney

* HTTP Can Do That?!

I have explored weird corners of HTTP -- malformed requests that try to trick a site admin into clicking spam links in 404 logs, an API that responds to POST but not GET, and more. In this talk I'll walk you through those (using Python, netcat, and other tools you might have lying around the house).
Hacks
Sumana Harihareswara

* Making the web fun again

When Geocities shut down, it did much more than delete a bunch of obnoxious dancing baby GIFs and Limp Bizkit MIDI files. It deleted the ability for people to easily create web sites, and learn how to be in complete control of the content and presentation they provide to their audience. To the economically and socially disenfranchised, it was a disaster that prevented countless people from learning programming. So we brought it back, and open sourced the entire thing (including our financial data). Leave your nostalgia at the door - let us show you our efforts to pave a better future for tech startups, the tech community, and the future of the web itself.
Culture
Kyle Drake, Victoria Wang

* Male/Female/Othered: Implementing Gender-Inclusiveness in User Data Collection

You want to gather information about your users that you can use to improve their experience and yours. They want their identities to be acknowledged and treated with respect. This talk is about meeting both needs: How to ask about gender in ways that welcome the diversity of reality while still being able to analyze the data you get back. We'll discuss the nature of that challenge, how some major websites address it, and example solutions for different scenarios.
Culture
Finn Ellis, Jonathan Harker

* Morning Keynote — Put Up or Shut Up: An Open Letter to Tech Companies Seeking Diverse Teams

People from marginalized communities struggle to break into tech, clawing our way through a racist, sexist, classist, ableist system only to be fired, quit or just suffer in misery. I’ll explore what it really takes to create a workplace that is truly welcoming of everyone.
Culture
Kronda Adair

* When Your Codebase Is Nearly Old Enough To Vote

What do you do when your project is so old that technology has changed around you? (Or, how do you future-proof a project that you've just started so that when it gets that old, you'll be ready?) Come hear a case study of Dreamwidth Studios, a fifteen-year-old web app with a codebase consisting of a quarter million lines of legacy Perl and a mission to modernize ... if it doesn't break everything.
Chemistry
Denise Paolucci

Favorite proposals for this user

* 5 Things I Wish Someone Told Me Before I Started Programming

There's more to being a successful developer than simply being great at programming.
Culture 2015-02-03 05:55:25 +0000
Kerri Miller

* 90 writing tips in 45 minutes

Almost every job involves a little writing, even if it's code comments or repair notes on a car. But what if you don't feel confident with writing? I have a rapid-fire presentation of writing tips and tricks that can help get you started, keep you going, and make your work better, even if you don't think you're a writer, I bet it will help!
Hacks 2015-01-20 02:50:35 +0000
Heidi Waterhouse

* Could Spambots Exist in Victorian England? and other questions about technology, society, and communication

As a tool for human communication, the internet has successes and failures. It allows us to meet people, collaborate, strengthen communities, and learn new things. It also enables oppression, harassment, and noise. These problems aren't new, but choices made in constructing the internet have often served to blindly facilitate their spread. Instead of continuing to assume that the technical, social, and economic constraints that kept such problems from destroying past systems will continue to hold, let's break down what's different from then to now, and find a new set of solutions.
Hacks 2015-02-25 04:35:16 +0000
Audrey Eschright

* Failure for Fun and Profit!

Do you actually know how to deliberately acquire, sharpen, and retain a technical skill?
Culture 2015-02-19 18:17:27 +0000
Kerri Miller

* Improving performance with responsive (and responsible!) images

Attendees can expect concrete examples of how the new `picture` element and `srcset` attribute work, and to learn how they can use responsive and responsible images right now to improve performance and deliver the best possible experience to their users.
Chemistry 2015-03-14 22:56:12 +0000
David Newton

* Stop Building Monoliths!

All I needed to do was validate a postcode, and validating non-US postcodes can be tricky, so I didn't want to write that code myself. So I went to Google and searched on "postcode validate javascript". The first link was to a library, and it did postcode validation! Then I read the documentation. Postcode validation was a method. Of a form object. Not a HTML form object, but the library's form object. I'd have to import the whole framework, and rewrite my application, just to validate postcodes. Hold on here: postcodes are strings first, and maybe form elements later. But wouldn't validating a postcode be a method on a string?
Chemistry 2015-03-14 23:09:47 +0000
Emma Humphries

* Success is Bigger Than Not Failing: A passionate plea for criteria

We talk a lot about minimum viable products, and building our products up from small features. We talk a lot about failure, and how to learn from it and not replicate failures over and over again. But what I haven’t heard a lot of discussion about is how we know we’ve succeeded. Is it market share? Usable product? Could understanding and setting a measurable, achievable goals help us overcome imposter syndrome, second sock syndrome, and feature creep?
Hacks 2015-02-25 06:25:24 +0000
Heidi Waterhouse

* The End of JS Frameworks: ES6 and Web Components

JavaScript has a long history of being difficult to structure and maintain. To deal with this complexity a swath of frameworks have emerged over the years. At a glacial pace we have seen the web improve and those changes are ubiquitous now. ES6 and web components are happening! Come to this talk to learn how to get started with vanilla web platform code.
Hacks 2015-01-21 19:16:48 +0000
Brian LeRoux

* The Ethics Of Software Development

The software we build has an impact on millions of people, and while it can be empowering for many, it is often disempowering for many others. Many times we as developers don't really think through these issues, and that is really a shame because the work we do has enormous impact on people's lives, and that impact is very often in opposition to a lot of the values that we hold dear. This session will talk through some of these issues, and explain why it is so important that we think about how we affect the world, and try to frame our work in a way that meshes well with our own values.
Culture 2015-02-18 19:42:28 +0000
Greg Dunlap