Adam Okoye's favorites

Open Source Bridge 2015

Favorite sessions for this user

* Build a Web Map with Open Source Tools

Come learn to make a map on the web! In this tutorial, we will build an interactive, data-filled web map using a number of open source tools including Mapbox.js (a JavaScript library based on Leaflet.js). We will cover several options for interactivity and data sources, and show how to integrate with external APIs and other mapping tools.
Cooking
Lyzi Diamond

* Calculating Guilt: Using open-source software in forensic DNA testing

DNA testing has become the "gold standard" of forensics, but linking an item of evidence to a person of interest isn't always clear cut. New open source tools allow DNA analysts to give statistical weight to evidentiary profiles that were previously unusable, letting juries weigh the evidence for themselves. This talk will discuss my lab's validation and implementation of the Lab Retriever software package for probabilistic genotyping.
Culture
Sarah Chenoweth

* Cassandra at the Keyboard: Whistleblowing at all scales

What do you do if you see something that needs change in your organization. How do you "say something" for your "see something"? What are the benefits and drawbacks of even minor whistleblowing?
Culture
Heidi Waterhouse

* Community Moderation: you can't always halt a flamewar with one raised eyebrow (but it rarely hurts to try)

Even in an email list, moderation isn't limited to setting the entire email list to require approval before messages are posted. You can create rules which reflect the culture you'd like to see, and call attention to ways that the community differs from that culture. You can point out when a particular post doesn't fit with that culture -- publicly or privately, whichever you think will do the most good. You can point out when a particular post exemplifies something great about the culture. You can point out particular rules that everyone needs to keep abiding by, without calling out a specific post. If a specific person, or a specific handful of people, have trouble with the rules, you could put them in particular on moderated posting for some time. If someone keeps breaking the rules, that person is a good candidate for being removed entirely. There are limits to what the rest of the community and the moderators should have to deal with, even though your project may choose to keep that as a last resort. Sometimes the problem can be solved by redirection. If the main email list is getting cluttered with off-topic posts, consider a just-for-fun or off-topic side list to divert threads to once they wander off code and into sports, kittens, beer, or knitting. It's easier to say "You shouldn't do that here" than "You shouldn't do that, period"; it's even easier to say "You shouldn't do that here, but it would be great right over there." And most of us could use a sports, kittens, beer, or knitting break every now and then.
Culture
Azure Lunatic

* Economics of Volunteer Labor: Three stories from Debian

What circumstances allow volunteer projects to flourish? This talk covers three examples in Debian, diving deep into the questions like whose permission is required, what technical background is needed, and more, to highlight lessons of that can help any open source community organize its activities to empower volunteers.
Culture
Asheesh Laroia

* From the Unicorn’s Mouth: Stories of Managing Multiple Diverse Identities in Tech

We each have many critical facets to our identity-- race, gender, sexuality, class, health, and family background are just a handful of examples-- and the interaction between them can shape our lives more than any one factor alone. In this panel discussion, learn about intersectionality, and what the experiences of those living at the crossroads of different minority identities can teach us about what it takes to create a truly inclusive open source community.
Culture
Megan Baker, Thalida Noel, Nichole Burton, Lisa Sy

* GeekChoir 2015

In this session, we'll continue the grand Open Source Bridge tradition of learning how to increase team cohesion, identity, and collaboration through music, joining our voices (in our uniquely geeky way) in harmony.
Culture
Michael Alan Brewer

* Good Enough Voter Verification & Other Identity Architecture Schemes for Online Communities

This talk is a deep dive into considerations for Identity Architecture for online communities. It's most specifically applications for political action, civic engagement, or virtual nations. I'll talk about pragmatic solutions for voter verification using the state voter registration database, schemes for peer to peer authentication, offline/online identification, Impartial Identity Architecture to control conflict, and more. The discussion is high level and appropriate for beginners, but there will be links to code and big ideas.
Culture
Ele Mooney

* Hello, my name is __________.

Our personal identity is core to how we perceive ourselves and wish to be seen. All too often, however, applications, databases, and user interfaces are not designed to fully support the diversity of personal and social identities expressed throughout the world.
Cooking
Nova Patch

* How to Really Get Git

You already know how to use “git status”, “git push”, and “git add” for your personal projects. You know how to work on a team project with git version control. How do you achieve the next level of git mastery and fix mistakes? We’ll cover how to set up your git environment for a productive workflow, different ways to undo your mistakes in git, and finally, how to use the IPython notebook to automate an entire git workflow.
Hacks
Susan Tan

* How to Teach Git

Version control is a necessary piece of the open source community and git has an unfortunately steep learning curve. Here is what I have learned from teaching git to beginners, so you don’t have to make the same mistakes.
Chemistry
Georgia Reh

* HTTP Can Do That?!

I have explored weird corners of HTTP -- malformed requests that try to trick a site admin into clicking spam links in 404 logs, an API that responds to POST but not GET, and more. In this talk I'll walk you through those (using Python, netcat, and other tools you might have lying around the house).
Hacks
Sumana Harihareswara

* Male/Female/Othered: Implementing Gender-Inclusiveness in User Data Collection

You want to gather information about your users that you can use to improve their experience and yours. They want their identities to be acknowledged and treated with respect. This talk is about meeting both needs: How to ask about gender in ways that welcome the diversity of reality while still being able to analyze the data you get back. We'll discuss the nature of that challenge, how some major websites address it, and example solutions for different scenarios.
Culture
Finn Ellis, Jonathan Harker

* Morning Keynote — Put Up or Shut Up: An Open Letter to Tech Companies Seeking Diverse Teams

People from marginalized communities struggle to break into tech, clawing our way through a racist, sexist, classist, ableist system only to be fired, quit or just suffer in misery. I’ll explore what it really takes to create a workplace that is truly welcoming of everyone.
Culture
Kronda Adair

* Removing Barriers: Ascend Project Post Mortem

Last year the Ascend Project was announced, then in the fall the first pilot took place in Portland. This year we'll report back on how it went, hear from participants, and break down what worked and what could be changed for future versions of this type of program. You'll definitely come away with some ideas for your next learning event, code school, or sponsored training.
Hacks
Lukas Blakk, Kronda Adair

* Stronger Than Fear: Mental Health in the Developer Community

Mental disorders are the largest contributor to disease burden in North America, but the developer community and those who employ us are afraid to face the problem head-on. In this talk, we'll examine the state of mental health awareness in the developer workplace, why most developers feel it isn't safe to talk about mental health, and what we can do to change the culture and save lives.
Culture
Ed Finkler

* Universal Web Design: How to create an awesome experience for *every* user

In this talk, I will describe how Universal Web Design principles can be easily applied to new or existing sites, how these principles will improve your users’ experience, and how Universal Web Design will save you time and money.
Culture
David Newton

* Write It Down: Process Documentation from the Ground Up

The collective knowledge base of an organization can be difficult to crack. Some things have "always been done that way" but no one knows why. This talk will help to expose those undocumented corners of your project, and give you tools for writing process documentation for new contributors using lessons from Not-For-Profit organizations.
Culture
Kat Toomajian

Open Source Bridge 2014

Favorite sessions for this user

* Explicit Invitations: Passion is Not Enough for True Diversity

Open Source suffers from a lack of diversity. Underrepresented populations, for systemic reasons, might never show up unless Open Source communities 'hack' themselves through explicit invitation & removing barriers to participation. Mozilla is funding two pilot studies designed to explicitly reach out to underrepresented groups in open source today. Seeking people who like to solve problems and then engaging them in a 6 week, full time accelerator program we hope to explore the question: Can we seed our communities by hacking the social/cultural/systemic issues in order to gain technical contributions from a more diverse set of minds and give to participants an experience in tech that might have long term benefits to them?
Hacks
Lukas Blakk