Thursday Bram's favorites

Favorite sessions for this user

* "A huge green fierce snake bars the way!"; or, Building a Text Adventure Game in Python

Have you ever wanted to vanquish a dragon with your bare hands? First step is making a world where you can. In this talk, I'll give you the blueprints for my Python text adventure engine, as well as some recipes for making things in a text-only world.
Cooking
Katie Silverio

* A Developer's-Eye View of API Client Libraries

A developer's experience of an API and its client libraries can make the difference between them building on a project and giving up in frustration. If you develop an API client library, you'll learn what you can do to get it out of the way so developers can spend mental energy on putting together exciting projects, not fighting with tools. If you work with web APIs, you'll learn about factors to consider when you're choosing a framework to use. Either way, you'll learn about best practices--code-related and not--that make the difference between fun and easy development and a frustrating slog.
Cooking
Frances Hocutt

* Build a Web Map with Open Source Tools

Come learn to make a map on the web! In this tutorial, we will build an interactive, data-filled web map using a number of open source tools including Mapbox.js (a JavaScript library based on Leaflet.js). We will cover several options for interactivity and data sources, and show how to integrate with external APIs and other mapping tools.
Cooking
Lyzi Diamond

* Building Diverse Social Networks

While only a handful of social networks like Dreamwidth and Quirell explicitly prioritize diversity, there are plenty of lessons to learn about what to do — and what not to do — from Facebook, Twitter, and others. Best practices include counter-oppressive politics, embedded in the community guidelines and norms; and the right tools, technologies, and policies. This session will look at what does and doesn't work in a variety of online environments.
Culture
Jon Pincus, Lynn Cyrin

* Care and Feeding of a Healthy Job Hunt

A job hunt can be a demoralizing and dehumanizing process, but there are a lot of things which you can do to make it more productive and less stressful.
Business
VM Brasseur

* Community Public Offerings: A New Way to Engage Markets (and Investors) in Oregon

Community Public what? This session will introduce the Community Public Offering - the vehicle for securities crowdfunding enabled by Oregon law this January (2015).
Business
kristin wolff, Simon Love

* Consequences of an Insightful Algorithm

We have ethical responsibilities when coding. We're able to extract remarkably precise intuitions about an individual. But do we have a right to know what they didn't consent to share, even when they willingly shared the data that leads us there? How do we mitigate against unintended outcomes? In this talk, we'll learn how to build in systematic empathy, integrate practices for examining how our code might harm individuals, and net consequences that can be better for everyone.
Culture
Carina C. Zona

* Desigining for Renaming

Renaming yourself is never easy. In Santa Clara County in the State of California, to file a petition to change one's name costs over $400, and may take six months or more. Then one must change one's name (and possibly one's gender marker) on the dozens of sites and services one uses. On many sites, that's easy, I go to preferences and edit my name. But then the site addresses me as "Mr. Emma Humphries," oh really? Other systems will correctly greet me as "Emma" when I log in. But still call me by $DEAD_NAME when they send an email. This brings us to the first best practice: When I change my name in one place, change it in all the places.
Culture
Emma Humphries

* Dog Food is for Dogs: Escape the Crate of Your Perspective with User Research

Dogfooding—using your own products—is nice, but is it sufficient to produce good design for people who aren’t you? Our familiarity with our projects and their quirks makes us poor substitutes for users in the wild. So just who are these users, and how do you incorporate them into design and development? In this workshop, we'll explore user experience design and research strategies that will help you design for people who aren’t you.
Cooking
Rachel Shadoan, amelia abreu

* For Love and For Money

Let’s talk about the work we want to do, the work we have to do, and how we might create systems that don’t continue to force bad choices between building community, technical work, and diversity activism.
Culture
Audrey Eschright

* Funding for Open Source Projects: Is a Universal Basic Income the Solution?

Contributing to open-source projects without worrying about making a living? What sounds like a dream could become a reality with the institution of an economic concept called basic income. The idea is currently being debated in numerous countries. This talk will introduce the concept and outline the possible benefits of basic income for the open source community.
Business
Luc Perkins

* How to Teach Git

Version control is a necessary piece of the open source community and git has an unfortunately steep learning curve. Here is what I have learned from teaching git to beginners, so you don’t have to make the same mistakes.
Chemistry
Georgia Reh

* How you tell the story matters: telling better stories and making better technologies

What happens when we tell stories? How do we tell stories about the technology we build, why do some stories get told over others? How do we talk about our successes, and how do we not talk about our failures? Whose stories get heard: how do women, people of color, disabled people, and “non-technical” workers get left out of the stories we hear? In this talk, I'll explore the role of storytelling in technology, and share what I've found about telling better stories.
Business
amelia abreu

* HTTP Can Do That?!

I have explored weird corners of HTTP -- malformed requests that try to trick a site admin into clicking spam links in 404 logs, an API that responds to POST but not GET, and more. In this talk I'll walk you through those (using Python, netcat, and other tools you might have lying around the house).
Hacks
Sumana Harihareswara

* Introduction to data munging with pandas and IPython Notebook

This talk will go over importing, exploring, and exporting your data, and common issues you may encounter.
Cooking
Meli Lewis

* Making the web fun again

When Geocities shut down, it did much more than delete a bunch of obnoxious dancing baby GIFs and Limp Bizkit MIDI files. It deleted the ability for people to easily create web sites, and learn how to be in complete control of the content and presentation they provide to their audience. To the economically and socially disenfranchised, it was a disaster that prevented countless people from learning programming. So we brought it back, and open sourced the entire thing (including our financial data). Leave your nostalgia at the door - let us show you our efforts to pave a better future for tech startups, the tech community, and the future of the web itself.
Culture
Kyle Drake, Victoria Wang

* Male/Female/Othered: Implementing Gender-Inclusiveness in User Data Collection

You want to gather information about your users that you can use to improve their experience and yours. They want their identities to be acknowledged and treated with respect. This talk is about meeting both needs: How to ask about gender in ways that welcome the diversity of reality while still being able to analyze the data you get back. We'll discuss the nature of that challenge, how some major websites address it, and example solutions for different scenarios.
Culture
Finn Ellis, Jonathan Harker

* Morning Keynote — Put Up or Shut Up: An Open Letter to Tech Companies Seeking Diverse Teams

People from marginalized communities struggle to break into tech, clawing our way through a racist, sexist, classist, ableist system only to be fired, quit or just suffer in misery. I’ll explore what it really takes to create a workplace that is truly welcoming of everyone.
Culture
Kronda Adair

* Open Source Tools for Scientific Research

Come learn about open science and the tools available for modern scientific research.
Chemistry
Amy Boyle

* Opening Up The Current Open Source Blueprint

Accessibility, diversity, and open source holding itself accountable to its own standards of what it means to be an open community.
Culture
Stephanie Morillo

* Software Archeology and The Code Of Doom

You approach the legacy codebase with trepidation. If the vine-draped entrance and collapsing roof weren't enough warning, traces of previous explorers before you lie scattered about, caught in bizarre traps and oubliettes. What next, snakes?!
Chemistry
Kerri Miller

* The Graceful Exit: Approaches for Changing One's Role in an Open Community

Open culture communities are passionate, dedicated backed by people. What happens when those people need to change their roles within the community? I've played varied roles in open culture communities through the years. In this talk I'll go over what worked well and what I wish I had approached in a different way when my role needed to change.
Culture
Kate Chapman

* The Open Source Writing Stack

Open source makes writing and publishing much easier both online and in print — provided you know what tools to use. This talk covers those tools (from LaTeX to WordPress) and how to choose between them.
Hacks
Thursday Bram

* The Public Library As An (Almost) Open Source Institution

Your public library can be one of your best allies for creating, distributing, and promoting Open Source ideas and projects. They want to help - they just need to know how.
Culture
Alex Byrne

* Through the Warp Zone: Hacking Super Mario Brothers

Discover new worlds in Super Mario Brothers even the creators never saw!
Hacks
Emily St., Shawna Scott

* What Are Computers, Really?

We'll take a whirlwind tour of the theory behind what computers do. We'll start with counting on our fingers and end with an explanation of why there are some problems where the laws of physics say "no, a computer can never do this". No mathematical background necessary.
Chemistry
Clarissa Littler

* What is LocalWiki, and why is it so much fun? Let's edit it!

LocalWiki, a very friendly and inclusive cousin of Wikipedia, is a project hosting region-specific open-content wikis where a community can write about local topics in as much detail as they like. I've had a ton of fun with this recently, and I'd like to explain to you why you might like it too! We can work on some first edits together.
Culture
Britta Gustafson

* When Your Codebase Is Nearly Old Enough To Vote

What do you do when your project is so old that technology has changed around you? (Or, how do you future-proof a project that you've just started so that when it gets that old, you'll be ready?) Come hear a case study of Dreamwidth Studios, a fifteen-year-old web app with a codebase consisting of a quarter million lines of legacy Perl and a mission to modernize ... if it doesn't break everything.
Chemistry
Denise Paolucci

* Your Job is Political: Tech Money in Politics

As much as the personal is political, the old-fashioned political still is too, and companies and individuals made rich by the tech industry and by open source software have been making increasingly direct monetary incursions into U.S. politics. Let's take a look at what policies & politicians our bosses, investors, users and contributors are buying at the local and state levels, with a specific focus on current changes in education policy and future moves in law enforcement.
Business
Kelsey Gilmore-Innis

Favorite proposals for this user

* Could Spambots Exist in Victorian England? and other questions about technology, society, and communication

As a tool for human communication, the internet has successes and failures. It allows us to meet people, collaborate, strengthen communities, and learn new things. It also enables oppression, harassment, and noise. These problems aren't new, but choices made in constructing the internet have often served to blindly facilitate their spread. Instead of continuing to assume that the technical, social, and economic constraints that kept such problems from destroying past systems will continue to hold, let's break down what's different from then to now, and find a new set of solutions.
Hacks 2015-02-25 04:35:16 +0000
Audrey Eschright

* Intermediate Bash

Level up your command line skills. Get tips for moving beyond mere proficiency at the command line.
Hacks 2015-03-06 08:56:55 +0000
Amy Boyle