Jen Griffin's favorites

Open Source Bridge 2016

Favorite sessions for this user

* 5 Years of WordCamps: Growth, Automation, and Lessons Learned

The number of WordCamps (volunteer-organized WordPress conferences) has nearly doubled since 2011. Find out how we’ve improved the WordCamp attendee experience while at the same time improving the experience of our volunteer organizers, through a combination of institutional support and community involvement, plus what problems we hope to solve in the years to come.
Practice
Andrea Middleton

* An Introduction to OpenSCAD using Legos

Learn 3D modelling with OpenSCAD through an hands-on tutorial for modelling Legos
Practice
Bhaskar Athmanathan

* Behind Closed Doors: Managing Passwords in a Dangerous World

A modern application has a lot of passwords and keys floating around. Encryption keys, database passwords, and API credentials; often typed in to text files and forgotten. Fortunately a new wave of tools are emerging to help manage, update, and audit these secrets. Come learn how to avoid being the next TechCrunch headline.
Practice
Noah Kantrowitz

* Black Pipe Testing, or "@#$! Up Your App by Impersonating a Database"

A “black box” test sends input to your program and tests the output. But a networked application has I/O at two ends: the API and the network. A black box test can’t validate it, especially its error-handling. But a “black pipe” test can! Such a test talks to your code over the network at the same time as it tests the API. I’ll present a handy library for Black Pipe tests of MongoDB apps and advise you when to use it. I want you to write a library like it for your favorite DB, so we can all test our programs better!
Practice
A. Jesse Jiryu Davis

* Build your own spamtrap: How to make a spam IP blacklist in 45 minutes

I show how to use Postfix, PowerDNS, Spamassassin, and Python/Flask to trap spam sent to your whole organization (and why you would want such a thing).
Hacks
Andy Schmitt

* Building a Life with WordPress

If you're dying to stick it to the man, or just looking to make extra money on the side, this talk is for you. We'll explore ways you can leverage the most popular CMS on the planet to start or grow an online business.
Business
Kronda Adair

* Cat Herding 101: Best Practices for Fostering an Engaged and Effective Online Community

Depending on what sector we come from, the words “community organizing/management” might invoke images of canvassing with flyers and clipboards or moderating online forums and high-fiving code contributors. Regardless, when we coordinate volunteers, email program participants, and chat with community members via social media, we are ultimately organizing and developing community. Whether your supporters are contributing content, volunteering, participating in forum discussions, or engaging on social media, you can play an important community management role.
Culture
Bethany Lister

* Corporate Open Source Fail

What makes companies with good intentions fail so miserably at open source? How can we (as engineers and managers) influence our bosses to "do the right thing"?
Business
Sarah Sharp

* Demystifying Regular Expressions

Long ago, in the early ages of computerdom, a language was formed from the primordial fires of Tartarus. The language would bind the spells of textual strings and forever control them: The Regular Expression. How about an interactive workshop for acolytes who wish to command this strong magic?
Practice
Howard Abrams

* Deployment as a Feature

Too often the deployment of software is treated as a necessary evil. When you design your deployments as a feature of your system, the productivity gains will surprise you.
Theory
Carl Hall

* Distributed Consensus with Raft

Getting people to agree to things is sometimes hard. But implementing consensus with computers is harder. And distributed consensus with computers is ​_really_​ hard. How do we do it? One answer: the distributed consensus algorithm known as _Raft_.
Theory
John Feminella

* Dodge Disasters and March to Triumph as a Mentor

Good engineers write good code, but the best engineers raise the skills of their junior colleagues, too. If you're a senior engineer, you must learn to mentor new hires. Besides, great mentors are critical to the careers of women and minorities in tech. I have failed at mentoring, then succeeded. Learn from me and march to mentorship triumph.
Culture
A. Jesse Jiryu Davis

* Enabling Open Source Contributors at Puppet

As open source software developers and community maintainers, fostering an inclusive community and giving contributors the tools they need to succeed is incredibly important, but not always easy. This is especially true when you have a complex distributed codebase and contributors without a background in software development. Through our attempts to enable our contributors we’ve encountered many challenges and iterated on many solutions with varying levels of success. Our hope is that by sharing the stories of our successes and failures, as well as the lessons we learned, we can help other community maintainers lower the barrier to entry for contributors.
Culture
Hailee Kenney, Morgan Rhodes

* Exit Condition: when to ragequit, raise hell, or duck and cover

If you're caught in a job or a project where you simply can't convince your colleagues or organization to treat you with respect, it often feels like you're in a maze with no clear way out. (Un)fortunately, you're not alone. There's no universal solution to navigating a toxic or abusive workplace, but there's power in finding a theoretical context, sharing our stories, and learning from each other. Come learn about the options of voice, loyalty, and exit, and hear the stories of others who have had to make hard choices.
Culture
Frances Hocutt

* Geek Choir

In this session, we explore ways to improve team cohesion, cooperation, and presence for each other through connecting via song.
Culture
Michael Alan Brewer

* Great Asana!

Bring your stiff shoulders, sore wrists, tight hips, aching back, and busy mind and explore how Yoga can help bring you relief, rest, and focus. Leave with ideas on how to incorporate 5 minutes of practice into your busy day to care for your body and mind. This class is accessible to all levels of ability.
Culture
Sherri Koehler

* Hard Problems in Terms of Service Enforcement

When you run an online service, you always hope you won't have to deal with abuse. But it's inevitable, and many situations aren't clear-cut as you might wish. Some examples of abuse are obvious, but this talk explores the grey areas and messy questions: what content should you consider a violation of your Terms of Service, and how do you handle it when it's reported to you?
Culture
Denise Paolucci

* Hogwarts is a Terrible Learning Environment: Discuss

Like many young Muggles of the early 00's, I dreamed of receiving my Hogwarts letter. But re-reading the series with an eye toward learning lessons about creating a positive learning environment, it's clear that Hogwarts School of Witchcraft and Wizardry contains some unfortunate lessons in what NOT to do. When it comes to crafting an environment that encourages asking questions, fosters cooperation, and ensuring the success of its developers -- I mean, wizards -- we can learn a lot from the mistakes of the Hogwarts faculty. In this magical talk, you'll learn how to be a better mentor and help your workplace become a place where your junior developers can flourish.
Culture
Lacey Williams Henschel

* Inside Websockets

Protocol design is about tradeoffs, and if you pick the wrong tradeoff, you may regret it for a very long time. Any time you have one part of a program talk to another part of a program, you have a protocol. In this talk, we'll dig into the details of how WebSockets work and what decisions the designers made.
Theory
Leah Hanson

* Introduction to Clojure

Move fast and break things in this 100-minute, introductory-level Clojure workshop!
Practice
Katherine Fellows

* Kubernetes 101

So you've containerized your application, and now you want to deploy it scalably across a cluster. Kubernetes is your tool for container service management; learn how to use it.
Practice
Josh Berkus

* Less Painful Legacy Code Replacement

Replacing legacy code is a challenge on every front, from managing stakeholder expectations to tackling the technical work. Thoughtful preparation and a pocket full of tools can make the experience a little less painful.
Practice
Jennifer Tu

* Librarians and Open Source: We Need Code, Too!

Getting people started is easy. Sustaining people through is not. Let's talk about the ways the Open Source community can help people beyond the beginning steps, in the context of public library programming and staff development.
Culture
Alex Byrne

* Little Leaks Sink Your Tests

"The tests pass on my machine." "Wait, it was working a minute ago." "Oh, that test is flaky sometimes." Unpredictable tests are toxic for our productivity. They undermine confidence in our code. They encourage us to wallpaper over the immediate problem, rather than fixing the underlying cause. In this presentation, we'll talk about a chief cause of flaky tests: leaky global state.
Practice
Ian Dees

* Make Your First Open Source Contribution on GitHub

Interested in becoming a contributor to open source projects? In this talk, I'm going to show you the technical aspects involved in working with git and GitHub to prepare and submit contributions, and then working with project maintainers to get them merged.
Practice
Miguel Grinberg

* Monoids, and Sketches, and CRDTs, oh my!

A (hopefully) accessible introduction to some of the key mathematical concepts that make distributed and streaming computation possible.
Theory
Kevin Scaldeferri

* More Than Binary: Inclusive Gender Collection and You

Many people identify their gender in many ways. So why do we build systems to capture accurate gender information with a dropdown that only lists “male” and “female”? This talk covers why you might want to consider alternative ways of selecting gender for your users, a brief overview of the current best practices, the case study of the decisions I made when creating my open source project Gender Amender (a library you can help work on right now!), and why more work needs to be done. I'd also like to facilitate a short discussion during the time slot, so that we can share varied perspectives on how to improve the entire process of gender collection, and articulate the lenses through which we can and should view gender (e.g. “what are some other data structures we could use to capture gender identity information?”).
Practice
Anne DeCusatis

* Open Source is People

For those who want to do more than just code, this talk will show you 8 ways I have contributed without opening up Vim once.
Culture
Justin Dorfman

* Open sourced tools for Agent Based Modeling

Agent-based modeling is a technique used to explore both complexity and emergence by simulating individual actors and their actions inside of a system. Think of systems such as the traffic in the city or financial markets where one actor can have an effect on the decisions of others until the system’s direction changes its course. During this survey, you will gain an understanding of open source software available in a variety of languages and how to get started quickly.
Practice
Jackie Kazil

* Our Unhealthy Relationship with Injection Vulnerabilities

Ever concatenated strings in your code? Did those strings include any kind of structured syntax? Then your code might be vulnerable to injection. What does that mean? I will show you the common patterns of injection that occur, what their impact might be, and how to avoid them.
Theory
Timothy Morgan

* Postcards from the Edge Case: When One Size Doesn't Fit All

For every average person that finds your product what they want, there is a person outside that average that wants to use your product. They might even be able to use your product, if there was a way to make it work for them. Outliers are useful for your design, if you harness them properly.
Culture
Alex Byrne

* Readable Regular Expressions: A Hands-On Workshop

What are regular expressions, what are they useful for, and why are they so hard to read? We'll learn what regular expressions are good for, how to make our own regular expressions, and how to make our regular expressions friendly and readable (yes it's possible... sometimes).
Practice
Trey Hunner

* Rethinking Social Media, Privacy, and Information Flow from the Ground Up

Inspired by security and privacy research in operating systems, we'll be discussing possible ways to redesign privacy models so that all users can have fine-grained control over both visibility of their content and how others can interact with it.
Theory
Clarissa Littler

* Sparkle security

"Agent Sparkle, you have been recruited as a security expert to use your skills to protect the kingdom of Project Rainbow. You might not feel qualified yet, but Project Rainbow has great faith in your ability to learn." Web security is perhaps one of most fun types of computer security to master: exploits can be constructed quickly and without many tools. But sadly, while there are many tutorials, they simply don't have enough rainbows and sparkles and the practice exploits tend to focus on the basics without flourishes. Project Sparkle is a set of "training missions" designed to make learning web security more kid-friendly, but we think the audience of Open Source Bridge will also enjoy exploiting the web to add more rainbows and sparkles!
Practice
Terri Oda

* Spelunking with ǝpoɔᴉu∩

What do a fistbump emoji, Mandarin Chinese, and rocket ships have in common? They're all represented with entries in Unicode, the biggest, baddest, and most widely-used open standard. In this talk, we'll explore the messy and conflicting ideas that humans call "text", and how we represent those ideas in software.
Theory
John Feminella

* Standardizing the Social Web - W3C #socialweb specs

The W3C Social Web Working Group has been developing standards to make it easier to build social applications in the open web. In this talk, you'll get an overview of the various specifications in development, (Activity Streams 2, Webmention, Micropub, and ActivityPub), to help you learn how each applies to the social web.
Theory
Aaron Parecki

* Supporting diversity with a new approach to software

It’s time for a new approach to software, one that embraces differences (not just tolerates them), and sees diversity as a strength. The industry is primed for change, and there are huge opportunities to do better by valuing emotion, intuition, compassion, purpose, empowerment, sustainability, and social justice. This highly-interactive session includes discussions of current “best practices” and emerging ideas from projects that have focused heavily on diversity, issues and problems in today’s environment, imagining how things could be different, and figuring out concrete steps to make it happen.
Theory
Jon Pincus, Tammarrian Rogers

* Supporting your Support: Give your Support Team Flowers, Chocolate, Money, and Stock Options

How to support your support team 1. Pay your support staff a living wage. There are many reasons why you should pay your support staff a living wage, including reduced stress and higher quality work. We don’t expect support staff to be paid on par with engineering, but they should receive the same benefits & perks as engineers. 2. Listen to your support team. Your support team has valuable, data-backed insights about your customers’ pain points. Prioritize support needs in terms of product improvements. 3. Support your colleagues’ career ambitions. Some people who work in support are interested in becoming engineers. You can encourage this by giving them time to learn coding or work on projects during work hours, or paying for educational materials or tech conferences. Respect the fact that not everyone wants to be an engineer as well. Support should be a viable career path in its own right.
Business
Kiera Manion-Fischer, Stephanie Snopek

* Take back social media with Poodle

Social media has tremendous power to enrich our lives - but social media services are largely controlled by private companies. An alternative is to replace centralized services with federated protocols. HTTP and email are examples of federated protocols that demonstrate that federation not only works, but can thrive and give rise to cultures and technologies that the protocol authors never imagined. Poodle is a prototype that I hope will bring those qualities to social media.
Culture
Jesse Hallett

* Taking no for an answer

Open source (like many fields) rewards people who are confident and even a bit pushy. So we give talks encouraging folk to get over imposter syndrome, lean in, say yes to more things. But self-improvement shouldn't focus only on our most vulnerable members, but also our most powerful. So let's talk not about saying yes, but about hearing no. Learning to take no for an answer can transform efforts such as security, diversity and mentoring where we have few experts or volunteers and great need. Let's talk about accepting "defeat" with grace, and how to take "no" for an answer while still moving forwards.
Culture
Terri Oda

* The Ability to Disable: Who Did You Forget When You Designed Your UI?

While the increased use of technology has in some ways improved the lives of those with disabilities, there is a gap that still needs to be filled. Uncaptioned or poorly captioned videos leave the deaf and hard of hearing community out of the loop, untagged photos leave blind users unaware of integral information, and poorly coded webpages are too much of a hassle for individuals using screen readers. But what if this was this was different? What if we thought about all of the potential users of our technology and developed programs intentionally allowing access for everyone? How could we make a programmer’s work truly inclusive, truly open to everyone? Experiential learning often provides those ‘a ha!’ moments, so together we’ll enjoy some mis-captioned videos, have a ‘listen-along’ to what a screen reader sounds like when a page is not coded correctly, and take a look at the end users’ experience when software is not programmed with a disabled audience in mind. Then, we’ll talk about what we can do to improve the current offerings and answer, “what next?”
Culture
Rebecca Jennings

* The Politics of Cooption in Open Source and Free Software

The Open Source and Free Software community is no longer simply a patchwork of hobbyist communities. Our change and growth brought many advantages, but some disadvantages too. We now operate in a microcosm not unlike the larger USA and international political climates. Hear the story of how it operates from an political insider.
Culture
Bradley Kuhn

* Tightly coupling your (REST) API docs

Documenting REST APIs isn't easy, and we need practical tips and tricks for keeping docs in sync with design and implementation. This talk explores some different but related ways to accomplish the goals of user-friendly, always up-to-date API docs.
Theory
Jennifer Rondeau

* Towards an Ethics of Care: Understanding and Acknowledging Care Work in Technology Companies

This talk explores dimensions of care work and best practices for acknowledging and understanding care work in technology teams, and makes the business case for considering all involved with building and maintaining technologies in strategy and planning. I explore ways in which to track the hidden costs of care work, and build a discourse of sustainability and inclusion around care work in technology companies.
Business
Amelia Abreu

* Type Theory 101

Have you heard about type theory and always wanted to understand the principles behind it, but always thought it was too complicated since it has a lot of Lambda Calculus and algebras? This talk will approach these concepts in a friendly way.
Theory
Hanneli Tavante

* Unraveling the Masculinization of Technology

Have you ever wondered where the perception that technology is a masculine pursuit comes from? Or why we have to explain that, "no really, women are interested in computers too"?
Culture
Audrey Eschright

* Welcoming Communities

A lot of people enjoy contributing to Open Source projects. And Open Source projects love contributions. And yet I keep seeing newcomers struggling to contribute and project maintainers struggling to find contributors. What’s the catch? There is a gap. A gap between the desire to contribute to a community and the ability to find one. A gap between what contributions are welcome, and what people think is wanted. A gap between what people wish they could contribute, but don’t know how, or are afraid to try. In this talk, I’ll share our learning from building the Hoodie Community, which is recognized as one of the most Open Source’s most diverse and inclusive.
Culture
Gregor Martynus

* What can the open source software of today learn from the history of software documentation?

In the early years of easily distributable software, technical writers and the documentation that they produced were a crucial part of the software development process. Why? What kinds of contributions did they make, and what might their close cooperation with the programmers of their day teach us about how to manage open source projects better today?
Culture
Jennifer Rondeau

* What Hath Von Neumann Wrought? Programming before programming languages

We program today in a rich environment, but that wasn't always the case. We celebrate the pioneers of programming languages: Grace Hopper (COBOL), John Backus (FORTRAN), John McCarthy (LISP), Kenneth Iverson (APL) and Peter Naur (ALGOL). But there was a time before programming languages. How did people program back then? I'll show you!
Theory
M. Edward (Ed) Borasky

* What We Talk About When We Talk About Code

Programming and open source have plenty of specific jargon to learn. How do we make sure we're not pushing away contributors with it?
Culture
Zoe Landon

* Why you can't afford to miss out on junior developers

What if your next hire could make your team faster, help create a more inclusive and diverse environment, be easy to find, and be super excited to work with you? These people are not unicorns, they're junior developers. Most teams just don't know how to bring them on and get these benefits. Whether you're in a startup, consultancy, or a BigCo, with a few tips and processes, any team can learn how to grow new developers.
Practice
Bracken Mosbacker

* Wiping Away the (Bad) Lines in the Sand in the Software Developer Community

Think of a shibboleth as a proverbial line in the sand that determines who belongs and who is an outsider. There are a lot of arbitrary shibboleths in programming. Text editors (emacs vs. vim vs. sublime), paradigms (object-oriented vs. functional), languages (everyone vs Java), type systems, are all topics of… to put it lightly, “vigorous conversation.” In set theory terms, the developer community does not do enough to encourage seeing different developer groups as unions instead of intersections. To a newcomer, this situation sets up too much of a danger of alienation. If someone makes fun of the language that you use to learn how to code, then you’re less likely to want to keep learning.
Culture
Walé Ogundipé

* Working Around a Project with Twenty Years of Precedents

How do you deal with a free software project that has been ongoing for many years? What happens when the original designers moved on long ago and even the elders don’t have all the answers? This session will examine how to work with existing precedents to drive evolution of the project.
Culture
Darrick Wong

* Yelling As A Service: Adventures in Unofficial QA

What goes into making a helpful bug report, if you're not even given access to the repository? Why should you, the user, report bugs? How do you navigate a series of gatekeepers who don't want to acknowledge your bugs? How do you maintain a good relationship with people in charge of a project that's screwing up your whole life?
Practice
Azure Lunatic

Favorite proposals for this user

* Becoming a Web Developer

The web is ubiquitous, having beaten out a litany of competing technologies, and many “native applications” rely on web-based back-ends. From desktop to mobile, to watches, virtual reality headsets, and cars -- the web is a core set of technologies with vast reach. This makes familiarity with web technology a valuable asset for many, many people. Whether you’re a software engineer, marketer, project manager, junior web developer, or student -- you will leave this session with the forest, the trees, and a compass for navigating all of it.
Practice 2016-04-11 01:03:54 +0000
Josh Simmons

* Community > Documentation > Code: a Guide to Successful Open Source

Many people create projects with amazing technical prowess, only to see it fail to gain traction. We wonder "I thought this was clearly the best solution, why aren't people using it? Did I miss some bugs? Is it too slow? What went wrong?" The answer usually isn't technical, it's documentation or community related. This talk will teach you all the non-technical things your project needs to gain traction.
Culture 2016-04-16 02:12:52 +0000
Bryan Hughes

* CSS Performance & What is the Browser doing?

Learn how the browser renders webpages, how to write better css, and how to monitor front end performance in Chrome.
Theory 2016-04-16 02:03:43 +0000
Sarah Etter

* Debugging Diversity

Despite the media attention given to the diversity in tech problem, many technology practitioners don't see how a lack of diversity affects their daily life. So, it is not surprising that they neither understand the magnitude of the problem nor how they can fix it. However, the principles and language of debugging, something technology practitioners understand well, can be used to help them understand diversity and their role in solving the problem. So, technologists already have a set of terms that they can use to tackle diversity. They just need to know how to apply those terms in order to effect positive change. These terms are expected behavior, tracing, refactoring, and sample code.
Culture 2016-03-16 19:25:11 +0000
Anjuan Simmons

* displayfs: Controlling displays remotely with a virtual filesystem

displayfs is a virtual filesystem for driving a framebuffer over a network. The primary use case is giving demos without exposing your laptop's workspace and compromising your privacy.
Hacks 2016-04-21 06:34:26 +0000
Josh Juran

* Domain-Driven Data

There are many types of open source databases and data analysis tools from which to choose today. Should you use a relational database? How about a key-value store? Maybe a document database? Or is a graph database the right fit for your project? What about polyglot persistence? Help!
Practice 2016-04-13 22:03:19 +0000
Bradley Holt

* Don't Get Scared, Get Started

Contributing to open source is rewarding in terms of the satisfactions you get while you help the open source community to grow as well as the new things that you get to learn. If you go on discussing about contributing to open source most of them find it intimidating. Most of them are scared of contributing to open source projects. Most of them think that it is too tough to get in, too tough to get started and they won’t be able to do it. There are a lot of myths about the difficulty level of getting started with contributing to open source. With this talk I would like to break the myths and tell the truths around them.
Culture 2016-04-20 06:24:13 +0000
Tapasweni Pathak

* Explicit is Better Than Implicit: Setting Expectations

Miscommunication, wasted time, hurt feelings: real dangers when communicating with strangers online. As FOSS maintainers and contributors, let's try documenting our communication guidelines the same way we document our code style guidelines.
Culture 2016-04-05 01:48:19 +0000
Trey Hunner

* Exploring Privilege in Open Source Communities

In many open source communities, privilege is rarely discussed. While it is not an easy topic to talk about, it is an important subject to explore if we want to make sure open source is truly open to everyone. After exploring sources of privilege and learning strategies to deal with it, we can all be better equipped to take action to improve our open source communities for the long run.
Culture 2016-04-12 16:46:20 +0000
Taylor Barnett

* Fail Early, Fail Often, Fail Well

If failure is inevitable, why aren't we taught how to cope with it? In this talk I outline 10 types of failure to avoid and detail a framework for navigating recovery from failures large and small.
Business 2016-04-11 00:59:34 +0000
Josh Simmons

* How I Learned To Stop Worrying and Love the Engineers: cross cultural clashes between Support and Engineering (and some ways to fix them)

It's possible to do Support work while knowing absolutely nothing about the underlying architecture. Support doesn't necessarily know why the product works, or even what language it's written in. It can be super tempting for an engineer to think that well, if these support people really had the competence and capacity to understand how the thing worked under the hood, then they'd be engineers and not mere support people, but that's a bad trap to fall into. Sometimes Support people are engineers in their own right, but a Support person with no computer science training can be an expert on the user interaction surfaces of the product and reproduce a result that has been baffling the engineers, even with no knowledge of the mechanism by which the bug is happening. It's helpful to give Support enough information about the architecture to have a better starting point for asking the user for details and trying approaches to replicate the problem. It can be tempting for Support to think that any given member of Engineering understands the entire breadth, depth, complexity, and interconnectedness of the entire product simultaneously at any given time, but this is a trap! A good amount of time Engineering has no clue in the slightest about what is going on in another branch of the product, and in a sufficiently complex codebase, there can be millions of lines of code that a single particular engineer has never touched or even heard of. Or it's been long enough since they worked on that part of it that they would have to take several hours of very hard study in order to figure out what's going on. In particular, sometimes in a bug report, Engineering can say "Okay, I see what *part* of the code the user is causing to fire, but I haven't the FOGGIEST idea how the customer actually got that to happen." It's very important for Support to list out every single step (even the ones that seem obvious) that leads to the error occurring.
Culture 2016-04-14 06:31:31 +0000
Azure Lunatic

* How I unexpectedly built a monster of an open source project

In 2009, Oh My Zsh was released. It's since become a popular open source tool used by developers around the world. Let's walk through how a really small idea turned into a big project.
Culture 2016-04-11 22:17:44 +0000
Robby Russell

* How To Be A Great Developer

Being a great developer is much more than technical know-how. Empathy, communication, and reason are at least as important, but are undervalued in our industry. We'll examine the impact these skills can have and how to apply them to our work.
Culture 2016-03-26 03:14:34 +0000
Ed Finkler

* In the Trenches of Open Source Culture: The Node.js Inclusivity Working Group

The goal of this working group strikes deep at the heart of problems in open source software. We hear the stories of contentious and dramatic flare-ups, but not the day to day work people do to make things better. Come learn what it's like and what it takes to make a difference in OSS culture.
Culture 2016-04-16 02:04:52 +0000
Bryan Hughes

* Introduction to rkt: A secure, modular container engine

CoreOS rkt is a secure, modular execution engine for app containers. It was designed to reflect the lessons of running container cluster infrastructure at scale and is released under the Apache license. Written in Go, rkt implements container isolation through a flexible and interchangeable set of “stages,” providing multiple execution regimes for a container image. At rkt’s core is a command line utility that does not invoke a long-running daemon process, making app container lifecycle management simpler and allowing loosely-coupled integrations with service management and orchestration systems like systemd and Kubernetes.
Theory 2016-04-21 00:34:57 +0000
Josh Wood

* Learning HTTP

HTTP is the fabric of the web and the growing API economy. Whether you're building a backend or a frontend application, creating an API, or consuming an API, it’s helpful to understand the basics of HTTP. Topics covered will include HTTP methods, request headers, request URIs, response status codes, response headers, resource representations, authentication, content negotiation, and caching.
Theory 2016-04-14 19:32:46 +0000
Bradley Holt

* Lossless Emoji - Doing Emoji Right

Learn how difficult it can be to do emoji right and what you can do to preserve the message and emotions of your users. If you take user input, you owe it to the internet to attend this talk.
Practice 2016-04-13 07:21:09 +0000
Ryan Kennedy

* Machine Ethics and Emerging Technologies

An autonomous car is driving down a single-lane road carved out of a cliff. Unexpectedly, a child runs in front the car chasing a ball, and trips. The car cannot stop in time to avoid a fatal collision, but it can sacrifice itself and its passenger by driving off the cliff. Should it? And if so, would you buy such a car?
Theory 2016-04-14 07:32:44 +0000
Paul Fenwick

* Machine Learning Algorithms in R - A Deep Dive

As a major benchmark and trend-setter in machine learning and statistics, R, a free and open source statistical computing language, has much to offer to anyone interested in machine learning, statistics, or numerical computing. In this tutorial, I will share with the audience the vast ecosystem around R, and get the listeners started right away with some of the most widely used machine learning algorithms. You don't have to be a statistician or computer scientist to use R - its concise syntax and expressive nature will only make you want to use it more and more for machine learning and other computing tasks!
Theory 2016-04-21 06:58:47 +0000
Helen Jiang

* Made in the Machine: New Cultural Practices, Critical Analyses, and Techniques in Digital Fabrication, Making, and Manufacturing

I first knowingly witnessed the "Maker Movement" in 2010, heeded its siren call by joining the MIT Media Lab in 2011, and became disillusioned later that year. But I've been stubbornly making--and critiquing the notions of Making--ever since.
Culture 2016-04-11 00:20:51 +0000
Arlene Ducao

* Technical writing as public service: working on open source in government

What if U.S. federal agencies decided to reuse and contribute to open source software projects built by other agencies, since agencies often have similar technology problems to solve? And what if they hired technical writers with open source community experience to write documentation for these projects? That would be pretty cool. Also, that’s my work. I'm part of 18F, a digital services consulting team within and for the federal government, and all of our work is open source.
Practice 2016-04-06 00:21:15 +0000
Britta Gustafson

* The High Barrier to Entry in Tech for the Underpriviliged

When you are trying to transition into tech, it helps to be part of an open source community that welcomes people from all types of backgrounds and experience-levels. If you are a beginner programmer and underprivileged, the search for the right tech community can be a daunting experience. You may be systematically excluded from participating in some communities by gatekeepers. As a programmer who comes from a marginalised community, allow me to share with you the story of how I found a programming community that welcomed and helped me to overcome the high barrier to entry in tech. This talk aims to encourage everyone to do their bit to create inviting communities for the underprivileged.
Culture 2016-04-08 23:02:52 +0000
Khalid A

* The open source GIS stack

The Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) has a stable of applications and technologies to make your mapping effective and fun. We'll explore some of the most popular apps.
Practice 2016-04-21 05:06:50 +0000
david percy

* Transpreneur: Tales of a FTM Transgender Entrepreneur

The primary reason I was able to make career pivots at Intel was due to my connections to the Women at Intel network. Through this network I was referred to career counselors, business contacts, and the technical experts I needed to move my career ahead. As an FTM, my inbox is still filled with opportunities from women in tech groups, but now when I see these emails I wonder if I will be welcomed or not. A recent email I received said specifically "if you are female please attend." As a person who now identifies as male, I find that my connection to the community that supported me for the entirety of my career is now becoming tenuous.
Culture 2016-04-14 15:35:59 +0000
Sev Leonard

* Twitter Bots for Community Building! (or How Do You Know When Someone Wants to go Vegan? Don't Worry, They'll Tweet About It)

I built my first Twitter bot in Node js to help automate a task: giving advice to people interested in being vegan. Simple enough! But even simple bots require love, maintenance, and moderation, to keep them useful, and more importantly, positive! How do you design and code a bot to engage with people in a way that maximizes positive interactions, and minimizes negative ones? I'll tell you what I did.
Practice 2016-04-21 05:28:38 +0000
Andrew Gardner

Open Source Bridge 2015

Favorite sessions for this user

* "A huge green fierce snake bars the way!"; or, Building a Text Adventure Game in Python

Have you ever wanted to vanquish a dragon with your bare hands? First step is making a world where you can. In this talk, I'll give you the blueprints for my Python text adventure engine, as well as some recipes for making things in a text-only world.
Cooking
Katie Silverio

* A Matter of Time

Did you know that every so often, a minute lasts 61 seconds? If that sounds like something that might break some software, you'd be right! In this talk, we'll discuss the common ways that time is implemented in a number of libraries you probably depend on, how these representations can fall short of giving us a complete picture of what time it is, and what we can do about this state of affairs.
Chemistry
John Feminella

* A Profile of Performance Profiling With pprof

When our code is slow, performance gains can often difficult to obtain. Our ideas of where to focus our attention are often wrong. pprof has become my go to tool, and it's easy to see why. Together we'll learn how to understand pprof's output to help us zero in on the parts of our code that need the most love.
Cooking
Lauren Voswinkel

* Aesthetics and the Evolution of Code

Elegance is an aesthetic experience. It’s about perfectly conforming to a set of imperfect standards, meeting a need with no extraneous lines or rough edges. Elegance in code is the result of a mysterious process, just as elegance in nature is— in the case of nature, the process is evolution.
Culture
Coraline Ada Ehmke

* Bringing non-technical people to the Free/Libre/Open world and why it matters

Software freedom advocates sometimes believe a myth of "trickle-down technology" — that open collaboration and freedom for programmers will somehow lead to more free and open technology for the rest of society. To build technology that truly empowers most people, we need more non-programmers actively involved in development. I'll share my story of how I started as a music teacher and became the co-founder of an ambitious Free/Libre/Open project. We'll discus lessons about outreach to others like me.
Culture
Aaron Wolf

* Bringing Security to Your Open Source Project

With high profile breaches in open source projects, the issue of security has become one of great import to many people. But many projects, especially smaller ones, are intimidated by the idea of a security audit. This talk will discuss ways for smaller projects to experiment, learn, and even have fun improving their security. No PhDs in security required!
Culture
Terri Oda

* Building Diverse Social Networks

While only a handful of social networks like Dreamwidth and Quirell explicitly prioritize diversity, there are plenty of lessons to learn about what to do — and what not to do — from Facebook, Twitter, and others. Best practices include counter-oppressive politics, embedded in the community guidelines and norms; and the right tools, technologies, and policies. This session will look at what does and doesn't work in a variety of online environments.
Culture
Jon Pincus, Lynn Cyrin

* Building mentoring into an open source community that welcomes and values new contributors

This session will talk about how to integrate mentoring into all the different layers of an open source project. This involves a change in the whole community which treats new contributors with respect, knowing they have something valuable to contribute to the project.
Culture
Cathy Theys

* Calculating Guilt: Using open-source software in forensic DNA testing

DNA testing has become the "gold standard" of forensics, but linking an item of evidence to a person of interest isn't always clear cut. New open source tools allow DNA analysts to give statistical weight to evidentiary profiles that were previously unusable, letting juries weigh the evidence for themselves. This talk will discuss my lab's validation and implementation of the Lab Retriever software package for probabilistic genotyping.
Culture
Sarah Chenoweth

* Catalyzing Diversity: Practical Advice for Navigating Minority STEM Communities to Open Up Open Source

How can Open Source Software projects attract minorities? Come to learn practical strategies to implement your diversity goals into actionable outreach efforts. We will describe ways to tap into minority STEM communities that exist both online and in meatspace. The former include Tweet chats and hashtags used by people of color who are enthusiasts of science (like #BLACKandSTEM) and tech (like #LATISM). The live events include annual conferences of minority students and professionals such as the Richard Tapia Celebration of Diversity in Computing.
Culture
Alberto Roca, Shauna Gordon-McKeon

* Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Pelican: A Comparison of Static Site Generators

Want to make a static site or blog, but not sure where to start? Tired of using Wordpress and looking for something better? This talk will get into the nitty-gritty details of how Jekyll and Pelican -- two popular static site generators -- work, and explain how to choose which is best for your project. Using examples you can clone from github, we'll cover the pros and cons of both SSGs, discuss things that neither does well, and give you a better idea of how to get your site up and running (with an open source tool!).
Chemistry
Lucy Wyman

* Economics of Volunteer Labor: Three stories from Debian

What circumstances allow volunteer projects to flourish? This talk covers three examples in Debian, diving deep into the questions like whose permission is required, what technical background is needed, and more, to highlight lessons of that can help any open source community organize its activities to empower volunteers.
Culture
Asheesh Laroia

* From the Inside Out: How Self-Talk Affects Your Community

Identifying and discouraging negative self-talk is a simple thing, but it can have a huge impact on your community in a positive way. It increases self-confidence, improves morale, and generally results in happier, more productive community participants. This, in turn, will make you happy.
Culture
Kat Toomajian

* From the Unicorn’s Mouth: Stories of Managing Multiple Diverse Identities in Tech

We each have many critical facets to our identity-- race, gender, sexuality, class, health, and family background are just a handful of examples-- and the interaction between them can shape our lives more than any one factor alone. In this panel discussion, learn about intersectionality, and what the experiences of those living at the crossroads of different minority identities can teach us about what it takes to create a truly inclusive open source community.
Culture
Megan Baker, Thalida Noel, Nichole Burton, Lisa Sy

* GeekChoir 2015

In this session, we'll continue the grand Open Source Bridge tradition of learning how to increase team cohesion, identity, and collaboration through music, joining our voices (in our uniquely geeky way) in harmony.
Culture
Michael Alan Brewer

* Hello, my name is __________.

Our personal identity is core to how we perceive ourselves and wish to be seen. All too often, however, applications, databases, and user interfaces are not designed to fully support the diversity of personal and social identities expressed throughout the world.
Cooking
Nova Patch

* How to Teach Git

Version control is a necessary piece of the open source community and git has an unfortunately steep learning curve. Here is what I have learned from teaching git to beginners, so you don’t have to make the same mistakes.
Chemistry
Georgia Reh

* How We Learned To Stop Worrying And Love (Or At Least Live With) GitHub

In the past few years, GitHub has become the most widely used platform for managing open source projects, thanks to the ease it provides for submitting and accepting pull requests. However, GitHub's issue tracker is not as full featured as more venerable bug trackers such as Bugzilla, and it is not as easy to use for organizations which have a large number of casual contributors. Come hear how one organization coped with the sudden loss of their Bugzilla database by restructuring their tracking workflow to use GitHub's built-in issue management features, as well as implementing API hooks to provide missing functionality.
Cooking
Jen Griffin, Athena Yao

* HTTP Can Do That?!

I have explored weird corners of HTTP -- malformed requests that try to trick a site admin into clicking spam links in 404 logs, an API that responds to POST but not GET, and more. In this talk I'll walk you through those (using Python, netcat, and other tools you might have lying around the house).
Hacks
Sumana Harihareswara

* Making the web fun again

When Geocities shut down, it did much more than delete a bunch of obnoxious dancing baby GIFs and Limp Bizkit MIDI files. It deleted the ability for people to easily create web sites, and learn how to be in complete control of the content and presentation they provide to their audience. To the economically and socially disenfranchised, it was a disaster that prevented countless people from learning programming. So we brought it back, and open sourced the entire thing (including our financial data). Leave your nostalgia at the door - let us show you our efforts to pave a better future for tech startups, the tech community, and the future of the web itself.
Culture
Kyle Drake, Victoria Wang

* Removing Barriers: Ascend Project Post Mortem

Last year the Ascend Project was announced, then in the fall the first pilot took place in Portland. This year we'll report back on how it went, hear from participants, and break down what worked and what could be changed for future versions of this type of program. You'll definitely come away with some ideas for your next learning event, code school, or sponsored training.
Hacks
Lukas Blakk, Kronda Adair

* Software Archeology and The Code Of Doom

You approach the legacy codebase with trepidation. If the vine-draped entrance and collapsing roof weren't enough warning, traces of previous explorers before you lie scattered about, caught in bizarre traps and oubliettes. What next, snakes?!
Chemistry
Kerri Miller

* The Graceful Exit: Approaches for Changing One's Role in an Open Community

Open culture communities are passionate, dedicated backed by people. What happens when those people need to change their roles within the community? I've played varied roles in open culture communities through the years. In this talk I'll go over what worked well and what I wish I had approached in a different way when my role needed to change.
Culture
Kate Chapman

* Through the Warp Zone: Hacking Super Mario Brothers

Discover new worlds in Super Mario Brothers even the creators never saw!
Hacks
Emily St., Shawna Scott

* When Your Codebase Is Nearly Old Enough To Vote

What do you do when your project is so old that technology has changed around you? (Or, how do you future-proof a project that you've just started so that when it gets that old, you'll be ready?) Come hear a case study of Dreamwidth Studios, a fifteen-year-old web app with a codebase consisting of a quarter million lines of legacy Perl and a mission to modernize ... if it doesn't break everything.
Chemistry
Denise Paolucci

* Write It Down: Process Documentation from the Ground Up

The collective knowledge base of an organization can be difficult to crack. Some things have "always been done that way" but no one knows why. This talk will help to expose those undocumented corners of your project, and give you tools for writing process documentation for new contributors using lessons from Not-For-Profit organizations.
Culture
Kat Toomajian

Favorite proposals for this user

* 5 Things I Wish Someone Told Me Before I Started Programming

There's more to being a successful developer than simply being great at programming.
Culture 2015-02-03 05:55:25 +0000
Kerri Miller

* Automate Yo'self

One of the greatest productivity boosts you can have as a programmer is optimizing your working environment to more tightly integrate your tools and remove inefficiencies. Come learn a number of tips, tricks, and tools that can make your programming experience faster and better.
Cooking 2015-03-08 05:44:12 +0000
John Anderson

* Community Management on Freenode

Joining a FOSS project's leadership is rewarding, but if you haven't participated in IRC channel administration before, the learning curve can be daunting. Come to this talk to learn from edunham's 3 years of community management on IRC, and hear about how to avoid committing a variety of humorous but embarrassing mistakes.
Culture 2015-03-15 00:11:24 +0000
E. Dunham

* Cooking with Chef

Chef is in simple terms an infrastructure automation framework based on Ruby with a very cute name. However, its more than that and its uses are immeasurable. It is becoming the standard by which technology companies deploy and configure their system. Join me as we use dive deep into this framework and become true chefs ourselves.
Chemistry 2015-03-14 19:04:10 +0000
Johanni Thunstrom

* Developing Fault-Tolerant Software With Your Favorite Programming Language

Fault-tolerance is more than handling unexpected signals, events and exceptions. It includes handling complete crashes gracefully along with memory corruption or invalid state that leads to crashes. All programmers are human and no actively developed source code can be completely perfect.
Cooking 2015-02-25 02:55:44 +0000
Michael Truog

* Dipping Your Toe in the Ruby Water: Using Ruby with Non-Ruby Projects

This session will introduce you to the Ruby programming language by comparing it to PHP, and show some creative ways to start integrating Ruby with your non-Ruby projects.
Chemistry 2015-02-09 20:51:26 +0000
Andrew Havens

* How to Get People to Do Things (of their Own Free Will)

What’s the secret to getting people to do things? This presentation will provide interesting, useful, and 100% ethical tools and perspectives.
Culture 2015-03-08 03:36:39 +0000
Maggie Starr

* Making music with Free/Libre/Open tools

The range of options for music-making on GNU/Linux with free/libre/open tools stretches from music-focused programming languages like CSound and PureData to simple tools like Audacity, Ardour, Guitarix, Hydrogen, and Musescore which are accessible to novice members of the general public. We'll explore the options for different sorts of musical creativity, focusing on the basic tools and how to get them set up effectively on GNU/Linux. In the session, we'll produce some brief compositions and recordings as we explore the software.
Hacks 2015-03-08 05:00:14 +0000
Aaron Wolf

* Sass: What It Is, How It's Used, and Why It's So Syntactically Awesome

This talk will start off with the basics of what Syntactically Awesome StyleSheets are, what features and functionality they have to offer, and why they're a great tool to have in your arsenal. We'll then delve into how to use Sass in developing your own sites and what tools you'll want to use alongside it, complete with a live demo and some in-production examples.
Cooking 2015-02-13 20:41:18 +0000
Lucy Wyman

* SlamData: SQL Isn't Just for RDBMS Anymore

NoSQL: the technology that everyone loves to hate on. Yet despite shaky formal foundations and horror stories of career-ending proportions, there's one thing I'm pretty sure of: NoSQL is here to stay. MongoDB is now the 4th most popular database of the world, and the company commercializing the open source database is valued at more than $1.6 billion dollars. For the longest time, the only way of accessing data in these NoSQL databases has been writing code: every database has its own API which lets you do various random things in sometimes very strange ways. That works for building applications, but it doesn't work for tooling, most specifically, for analytics and reporting. If you've ever tried to building a data processing workflow or some reporting machinery on top a NoSQL database, you know exactly what I'm talking about: it's painful, write-once, often buggy code you'll end up throwing away some day. What if there were another way? What if you could query databases like MongoDB as easily as MySQL? What if you could hook up standard open source database tools to MongoDB like Squirrel, and have things just work? Thanks to an open source project I've been working on for the past year and a half, I'm happy to say all these things are possible. ...
Chemistry 2015-01-15 14:26:59 +0000
John A. De Goe

* Stop Building Monoliths!

All I needed to do was validate a postcode, and validating non-US postcodes can be tricky, so I didn't want to write that code myself. So I went to Google and searched on "postcode validate javascript". The first link was to a library, and it did postcode validation! Then I read the documentation. Postcode validation was a method. Of a form object. Not a HTML form object, but the library's form object. I'd have to import the whole framework, and rewrite my application, just to validate postcodes. Hold on here: postcodes are strings first, and maybe form elements later. But wouldn't validating a postcode be a method on a string?
Chemistry 2015-03-14 23:09:47 +0000
Emma Humphries

* Stuck in the MUD: Writing a Scalable & Asynchronous TCP Server in Ruby

An introduction of CarbonMU, my new open-source Ruby MUD platform, and Celluloid, the underlying Ruby concurrent/actor-based programming framework.
Chemistry 2015-03-07 00:41:49 +0000
Tim Krajcar

* Test-Builder and beyond

Test-Builder, the foundation upon which Test-More, Test-Simple, and just about any other Test-Package are built, is getting new internals. Test-Builder and its internals are nearly 10 years old, and they are showing their age. It has been known for some time that things would have to change eventually. A few years back Schwern launched the Test-Builder 2 project. This effort ultimately failed to reach adoption. However a recent change, which simply modified a comment, managed to break Moose and other related packages, we simply can't sit around and let such things continue to happen.
Chemistry 2015-01-21 22:52:18 +0000
Chad Granum

* Testing the Bottom Turtle: An Extreme Case of Integration Testing for the Web

Every time I push a commits to GitHub, many different systems wake up and start collaborating to test integrations with content servers, browsers, operating systems, and even major social networks. We've learned a lot building this testing infrastructure and I want to show you how you can use the same approach -- using free services -- for your next project.
Cooking 2015-03-08 01:10:50 +0000
Sean McGregor

* The Dead Language Fallacy

Our precious programming languages are being struck with a plague. Each year another language is declared dead or dying. But is that true or simply the tech equivalent of tabloid reporting?
Culture 2015-03-07 21:17:21 +0000
VM Brasseur

* The Psychology of Open Communities

Open source software may be made of ones and zeroes, but open source communities are made of people. This talk is a whirlwind tour of what research psychology has to tell us about how individuals and groups learn, falter, and grow. The talk will emphasize "takeaways" - ways for you to use this research to improve your communities and your experiences in them.
Culture 2015-03-04 22:52:09 +0000
Shauna Gordon-McKeon

* User Style Zen: Balancing Standarization, Customization, and Accessibility

More and more, social media sites are allowing users to customize and style their own profiles and pages. On one hand, this lets people show their individuality and make their mark on their content. On the other, it presents problems for developers who want to make these options available, but have to balance that with site security and usability.
Culture 2015-03-08 04:38:46 +0000
Ruth Hatch

* Web Applications and a Brighter Future for Open Source Adoption

In this talk, we discuss how web applications changed expectations of both sysadmins and end users, and what open source projects and organizations can do to help open source thrive in the web ecosystem. Attend and you’ll see a brief reminder of how web apps changed the developer-user relationship in open source, how some open source web app communities have reacted, what tools exist to get past the hosting barrier, and how your open source web app project can thrive.
Business 2015-03-07 06:33:38 +0000
Philip James

* What Can Software Teams Learn from Square Dancing?

In this talk, I’ll demonstrate things I've learned from square dancing that I’ve found applicable to software development, sometimes in surprising ways. These lessons can help us all write better software and have a better time doing it!
Culture 2015-03-08 03:53:19 +0000
L Dean

* Why nobody cares about your GitHub project

Open source is hard. Everybody tells you to create a GitHub account and start throwing your code out there. Once you do, you realize that nobody really cares. In this talk, we'll see what you can do to increase the visibility of your work and how this can dramatically affect the quality of your project.
Chemistry 2015-02-24 15:16:27 +0000
Zeno Rocha