L Dean's favorites

Open Source Bridge 2017

Favorite proposals for this user

* Nothing is better than the Optional type

Optional should be prohibited: it is an overreaction to a problem that already has an elegant solution.
Practice 2017-04-01 05:10:32 +0000
Michael Ernst

* Welcome, new person! We're glad you're here.

One of the things I want to know when I walk into a new organization is "how do things happen here?" This includes both "how do we talk about about things getting done" and "how they actually get done".
Culture 2017-04-10 06:56:33 +0000
Social Justice SRE

Open Source Bridge 2016

Favorite sessions for this user

* Hogwarts is a Terrible Learning Environment: Discuss

Like many young Muggles of the early 00's, I dreamed of receiving my Hogwarts letter. But re-reading the series with an eye toward learning lessons about creating a positive learning environment, it's clear that Hogwarts School of Witchcraft and Wizardry contains some unfortunate lessons in what NOT to do. When it comes to crafting an environment that encourages asking questions, fosters cooperation, and ensuring the success of its developers -- I mean, wizards -- we can learn a lot from the mistakes of the Hogwarts faculty. In this magical talk, you'll learn how to be a better mentor and help your workplace become a place where your junior developers can flourish.
Culture
Lacey Williams Henschel

* Less Painful Legacy Code Replacement

Replacing legacy code is a challenge on every front, from managing stakeholder expectations to tackling the technical work. Thoughtful preparation and a pocket full of tools can make the experience a little less painful.
Practice
Jennifer Tu

* Little Leaks Sink Your Tests

"The tests pass on my machine." "Wait, it was working a minute ago." "Oh, that test is flaky sometimes." Unpredictable tests are toxic for our productivity. They undermine confidence in our code. They encourage us to wallpaper over the immediate problem, rather than fixing the underlying cause. In this presentation, we'll talk about a chief cause of flaky tests: leaky global state.
Practice
Ian Dees

* Taking no for an answer

Open source (like many fields) rewards people who are confident and even a bit pushy. So we give talks encouraging folk to get over imposter syndrome, lean in, say yes to more things. But self-improvement shouldn't focus only on our most vulnerable members, but also our most powerful. So let's talk not about saying yes, but about hearing no. Learning to take no for an answer can transform efforts such as security, diversity and mentoring where we have few experts or volunteers and great need. Let's talk about accepting "defeat" with grace, and how to take "no" for an answer while still moving forwards.
Culture
Terri Oda

* Why you can't afford to miss out on junior developers

What if your next hire could make your team faster, help create a more inclusive and diverse environment, be easy to find, and be super excited to work with you? These people are not unicorns, they're junior developers. Most teams just don't know how to bring them on and get these benefits. Whether you're in a startup, consultancy, or a BigCo, with a few tips and processes, any team can learn how to grow new developers.
Practice
Bracken Mosbacker

* Yelling As A Service: Adventures in Unofficial QA

What goes into making a helpful bug report, if you're not even given access to the repository? Why should you, the user, report bugs? How do you navigate a series of gatekeepers who don't want to acknowledge your bugs? How do you maintain a good relationship with people in charge of a project that's screwing up your whole life?
Practice
Azure Lunatic

Favorite proposals for this user

* Even Cowboy Coders Get the Site Reliability Blues

The principles behind building reliable distributed systems and gracefully managing changes in them turn out to look a lot like the principles behind building psychologically safe communities. In this talk, I'll explain some of the basic principles behind site reliability engineering and how they relate to feminist and social justice ideas. This talk assumes no prior knowledge of site reliability engineering.
Culture 2016-04-19 22:32:28 +0000
Tim Chevalier

* Transpreneur: Tales of a FTM Transgender Entrepreneur

The primary reason I was able to make career pivots at Intel was due to my connections to the Women at Intel network. Through this network I was referred to career counselors, business contacts, and the technical experts I needed to move my career ahead. As an FTM, my inbox is still filled with opportunities from women in tech groups, but now when I see these emails I wonder if I will be welcomed or not. A recent email I received said specifically "if you are female please attend." As a person who now identifies as male, I find that my connection to the community that supported me for the entirety of my career is now becoming tenuous.
Culture 2016-04-14 15:35:59 +0000
Sev Leonard

Open Source Bridge 2015 Birds of a Feather

Favorite proposals for this user

* Nothing Is Totally Incomprehensible If We Try Together

Let's talk about ways to demystify programming topics that people think are mysterious, incomprehensible, and scarily hard.
Birds of a Feather session 2015-03-13 20:04:51 +0000
Sumana Harihareswara

Open Source Bridge 2015

Favorite sessions for this user

* A Profile of Performance Profiling With pprof

When our code is slow, performance gains can often difficult to obtain. Our ideas of where to focus our attention are often wrong. pprof has become my go to tool, and it's easy to see why. Together we'll learn how to understand pprof's output to help us zero in on the parts of our code that need the most love.
Cooking
Lauren Voswinkel

* Bringing Security to Your Open Source Project

With high profile breaches in open source projects, the issue of security has become one of great import to many people. But many projects, especially smaller ones, are intimidated by the idea of a security audit. This talk will discuss ways for smaller projects to experiment, learn, and even have fun improving their security. No PhDs in security required!
Culture
Terri Oda

* Building mentoring into an open source community that welcomes and values new contributors

This session will talk about how to integrate mentoring into all the different layers of an open source project. This involves a change in the whole community which treats new contributors with respect, knowing they have something valuable to contribute to the project.
Culture
Cathy Theys

* Care and Feeding of a Healthy Job Hunt

A job hunt can be a demoralizing and dehumanizing process, but there are a lot of things which you can do to make it more productive and less stressful.
Business
VM Brasseur

* Cassandra at the Keyboard: Whistleblowing at all scales

What do you do if you see something that needs change in your organization. How do you "say something" for your "see something"? What are the benefits and drawbacks of even minor whistleblowing?
Culture
Heidi Waterhouse

* Community Moderation: you can't always halt a flamewar with one raised eyebrow (but it rarely hurts to try)

Even in an email list, moderation isn't limited to setting the entire email list to require approval before messages are posted. You can create rules which reflect the culture you'd like to see, and call attention to ways that the community differs from that culture. You can point out when a particular post doesn't fit with that culture -- publicly or privately, whichever you think will do the most good. You can point out when a particular post exemplifies something great about the culture. You can point out particular rules that everyone needs to keep abiding by, without calling out a specific post. If a specific person, or a specific handful of people, have trouble with the rules, you could put them in particular on moderated posting for some time. If someone keeps breaking the rules, that person is a good candidate for being removed entirely. There are limits to what the rest of the community and the moderators should have to deal with, even though your project may choose to keep that as a last resort. Sometimes the problem can be solved by redirection. If the main email list is getting cluttered with off-topic posts, consider a just-for-fun or off-topic side list to divert threads to once they wander off code and into sports, kittens, beer, or knitting. It's easier to say "You shouldn't do that here" than "You shouldn't do that, period"; it's even easier to say "You shouldn't do that here, but it would be great right over there." And most of us could use a sports, kittens, beer, or knitting break every now and then.
Culture
Azure Lunatic

* Consequences of an Insightful Algorithm

We have ethical responsibilities when coding. We're able to extract remarkably precise intuitions about an individual. But do we have a right to know what they didn't consent to share, even when they willingly shared the data that leads us there? How do we mitigate against unintended outcomes? In this talk, we'll learn how to build in systematic empathy, integrate practices for examining how our code might harm individuals, and net consequences that can be better for everyone.
Culture
Carina C. Zona

* Desigining for Renaming

Renaming yourself is never easy. In Santa Clara County in the State of California, to file a petition to change one's name costs over $400, and may take six months or more. Then one must change one's name (and possibly one's gender marker) on the dozens of sites and services one uses. On many sites, that's easy, I go to preferences and edit my name. But then the site addresses me as "Mr. Emma Humphries," oh really? Other systems will correctly greet me as "Emma" when I log in. But still call me by $DEAD_NAME when they send an email. This brings us to the first best practice: When I change my name in one place, change it in all the places.
Culture
Emma Humphries

* Email as Distributed Protocol Transport: How Meeting Invites Work and Ideas for the Future

Learn how meeting invites work and some crazy other ideas for distributed protocols built on email.
Chemistry
Christine Spang

* Escapology: multilingual ContentEditable rich text editing

VisualEditor, Wikimedia's rich text editor, extends and normalizes browser contenteditable behaviour from Javascript. To work well for all languages, it must satisfy a seemingly impossible set of constraints. This is the story of how we managed.
Hacks
David Chan

* Failing With Grace

One of the biggest challenges of building distributed systems is dealing with failure. In this talk we'll explore how distributed systems fail and then once we're good and scared, we'll cover a number of approaches and tools to help you deal with failure.
Cooking
Sean O'Connor

* Fear Driven Development

Have you ever not made a much-needed change because you were afraid of breaking something? Caution is wise, but too much fear can leave even the most agile of software organizations with a crippling aversion to change. This talk will discuss what makes us scared, why it hurts us, and my experiences helping a team I managed get rid of some of our fears.
Culture
Ryan Kennedy

* Five years, 1000 students: The story of Open Source Comes to Campus

Since 2010, OpenHatch has been running workshops at college campuses, teaching undergrads how to get involved in open source. In 2015, we expect to reach over 500 students through 25 events. This talk presents how we've the scaled program over the years, how we've evolved our curriculum, and how you can get involved.
Culture
Asheesh Laroia

* From the Inside Out: How Self-Talk Affects Your Community

Identifying and discouraging negative self-talk is a simple thing, but it can have a huge impact on your community in a positive way. It increases self-confidence, improves morale, and generally results in happier, more productive community participants. This, in turn, will make you happy.
Culture
Kat Toomajian

* How Do Python Coroutines Work?

Asynchronous I/O frameworks like Node, Twisted, Tornado, and Python 3.4’s new “asyncio” can efficiently scale past tens of thousands of concurrent connections. But async coding with callbacks is painful and error-prone. Programmers increasingly use coroutines in place of callbacks to get the best of both worlds: efficiency plus a natural and robust coding style. I’ll explain how asyncio’s coroutines work. They are built using Python generators, the “yield from” statement, and the Future and Task classes. You will gain a deep understanding of this miraculous new programming idiom in the Python standard library.
Chemistry
A. Jesse Jiryu Davis

* How the Internet Works

The Internet runs the world; it connects our devices, powers our businesses, and even talks to our thermostats. But how does it all happen? We will follow an adventurous young web browser from the moment a hapless user presses "enter" and witness the trials and tribulations of many packets. Ride alongside the most fearsome syscalls as we learn how the Internet works!
Chemistry
Noah Kantrowitz

* How To Be A Great Developer

Being a great developer is much more than technical know-how. Empathy, communication, and reason are at least as important, but are undervalued in our industry. We'll examine the impact these skills can have and how to apply them to our work.
Business
Ed Finkler

* How you tell the story matters: telling better stories and making better technologies

What happens when we tell stories? How do we tell stories about the technology we build, why do some stories get told over others? How do we talk about our successes, and how do we not talk about our failures? Whose stories get heard: how do women, people of color, disabled people, and “non-technical” workers get left out of the stories we hear? In this talk, I'll explore the role of storytelling in technology, and share what I've found about telling better stories.
Business
amelia abreu

* HTTP Can Do That?!

I have explored weird corners of HTTP -- malformed requests that try to trick a site admin into clicking spam links in 404 logs, an API that responds to POST but not GET, and more. In this talk I'll walk you through those (using Python, netcat, and other tools you might have lying around the house).
Hacks
Sumana Harihareswara

* Humanising Math and Physics on Computer Science

There are some myths around Science - it's boring, useless, difficult. Many of them are heard while we are young, and many people tend to take then for the entire life. Science is very important, specially on Computer Science and Engineering, for building the basis of our logical thinking.
Culture
Hanneli Tavante

* Leveraging Docker to Enable Learning

When giving workshops or presenting online tutorials, it's frequently the case that the system setup can take longer than the actual learning exercises. Using Docker to provide a learning sandbox solves this problem while avoiding changing the learner's system in potentially destructive ways.
Cooking
Kirsten Hunter

* Monads Made Semi-Understandable

The word monad is all around us. I've heard long explanations of it that seem to over complicate it or make it intimidating. At Hacker School one of my goals was to learn some category theory, and understand the beast. I finally got it, and it wasn't so bad. I wanted to explain monads in a way that would not intimidate people and that would so some solid examples so if they felt like i had before, I might be able to help.
Hacks
libby kent

* Morning Keynote — Put Up or Shut Up: An Open Letter to Tech Companies Seeking Diverse Teams

People from marginalized communities struggle to break into tech, clawing our way through a racist, sexist, classist, ableist system only to be fired, quit or just suffer in misery. I’ll explore what it really takes to create a workplace that is truly welcoming of everyone.
Culture
Kronda Adair

* Project Fear

Project fear, not dissimilar to imposter syndrome, tends to affect all project leaders at some point (or many points) in their career. This session will tackle project fear by fully defining it, investigating its roots, noting its symptoms, and ultimately discussing a number of successful coping mechanisms.
Business
Adam Edgerton

* Removing Barriers: Ascend Project Post Mortem

Last year the Ascend Project was announced, then in the fall the first pilot took place in Portland. This year we'll report back on how it went, hear from participants, and break down what worked and what could be changed for future versions of this type of program. You'll definitely come away with some ideas for your next learning event, code school, or sponsored training.
Hacks
Lukas Blakk, Kronda Adair

* Stronger Than Fear: Mental Health in the Developer Community

Mental disorders are the largest contributor to disease burden in North America, but the developer community and those who employ us are afraid to face the problem head-on. In this talk, we'll examine the state of mental health awareness in the developer workplace, why most developers feel it isn't safe to talk about mental health, and what we can do to change the culture and save lives.
Culture
Ed Finkler

* Testing the Multiverse

It’s a basic principle of testing that minimizing dependencies will make you happier, faster, and more productive. But what happens when you can’t?
Cooking
Jason Clark

* What's in a name? Phonetic Algorithms for Search and Similarity

Search can be as simple as returning a word or part of word based on character similarity. LIKE and wildcard matches can be sufficient, but can only account for character or string matching, and fail on misspelled words or names. Phonetic algorithms can help us find matches for misspellings and typo'd user data.
Chemistry
Mercedes Coyle

* Why Making a Programming Language is Awesome

Learn about the journey of creating Wake, a modern programming language
Hacks
Michael R Fairhurst

* You Got Your Idris in My C++! A First Look at Denotational Design

Programmers gripe that we have two kinds of programming languages: the ones we write in for fun, and the ones we write in because we have to. We may enjoy coding that weekend project in Agda, but we have to leave that smile behind on Monday morning when we go back to Java or C++. But is that really the case? Or can we find a way of bringing the expressiveness, the rigor, or the fun of our favorite languages into our day jobs?
Chemistry
Ian Dees

* Your Job is Political: Tech Money in Politics

As much as the personal is political, the old-fashioned political still is too, and companies and individuals made rich by the tech industry and by open source software have been making increasingly direct monetary incursions into U.S. politics. Let's take a look at what policies & politicians our bosses, investors, users and contributors are buying at the local and state levels, with a specific focus on current changes in education policy and future moves in law enforcement.
Business
Kelsey Gilmore-Innis