Ryan Kennedy's favorites

Open Source Bridge 2016

Favorite sessions for this user

* A programmers guide to Music.

Imagine a place where Ruby meets Music, its called MAGIC LAND. Music is not a lot different from programming. In this talk we will see how. I will talk about this amazing piece of open-source software called SonicPi. SonicPi is a new kind of musical instrument. Think about it, you write code to make music. And it gets even better, code is written in a ruby DSL. Also I will talk about notes, samples, synth and other musical things SonicPi lets us do it. Don't worry if do not get these terms. When I started, I did not either. But at the end of the talk, you will know how to make music.
Culture
Rishi Jain

* Accidental Developer Evangelism

Learn how to organize community events and share your ideas with the open-source community AFK!
Culture
Katherine Fellows

* Building a Life with WordPress

If you're dying to stick it to the man, or just looking to make extra money on the side, this talk is for you. We'll explore ways you can leverage the most popular CMS on the planet to start or grow an online business.
Business
Kronda Adair

* Dodge Disasters and March to Triumph as a Mentor

Good engineers write good code, but the best engineers raise the skills of their junior colleagues, too. If you're a senior engineer, you must learn to mentor new hires. Besides, great mentors are critical to the careers of women and minorities in tech. I have failed at mentoring, then succeeded. Learn from me and march to mentorship triumph.
Culture
A. Jesse Jiryu Davis

* GDB: A Gentle Intro

We love Ruby for its elegance, its simplicity, its flexibility. But our favorite language perches atop a whole world of native code, and that other world occasionally intrudes.
Practice
Jason Clark

* Graph Databases WIll Change Your Freakin Life

Most developer have worked with relational DBs like MySQL or PostgreSQL, but for many use cases they aren't the best option. Graph databases have a simpler, more powerful model for handling complex related data. In this talk we'll work with Neo4j to explore the advantages of graph DBs. Attendees will learn the graph model, how graph DBs let you do things that are practically impossible with SQL, and the best options for integrating one into your application -- new or existing.
Practice
Ed Finkler

* Great Asana!

Bring your stiff shoulders, sore wrists, tight hips, aching back, and busy mind and explore how Yoga can help bring you relief, rest, and focus. Leave with ideas on how to incorporate 5 minutes of practice into your busy day to care for your body and mind. This class is accessible to all levels of ability.
Culture
Sherri Koehler

* Hard Problems in Terms of Service Enforcement

When you run an online service, you always hope you won't have to deal with abuse. But it's inevitable, and many situations aren't clear-cut as you might wish. Some examples of abuse are obvious, but this talk explores the grey areas and messy questions: what content should you consider a violation of your Terms of Service, and how do you handle it when it's reported to you?
Culture
Denise Paolucci

* Introduction to Clojure

Move fast and break things in this 100-minute, introductory-level Clojure workshop!
Practice
Katherine Fellows

* Introduction to Neural Networks with Tensorflow

I intend to introduce Neural Networks as a very simple concept. This can be achieved with Google's newest open-source library in Python called Tensorflow. I want to dispel the myth that Neural Networks are hard to understand and implement. I also want to introduce the current state of Neural Networks as they are continually changing the landscape of visual recognition and natural language processing.
Theory
Nick McClure

* Let’s build a CI/CD pipeline

An exploration of the cost and value of CI/CD, and a walkthrough of setting up a CI/CD pipeline.
Practice
Jean de Klerk

* Monitoring Asynchronous Applications

The lure of asynchronous programming is that it will make your application run faster and your code simpler to reason about. So we have our wonderfully efficient non-blocking app; how do we check that it's delivering the goods performance wise?
Practice
Amy Boyle

* Open Source and Diabetes: Helping Millions

This talk will cover the fascinating things happening in the open source diabetes tech (D Tech) space (think the Glucosio Project and Nightscout Project) and will emphasize the importance of open source in improving the health outcomes of people with diabetes.
Culture
Benjamin Kerensa

* The Rise of Emoji

Emoji is taking over the Web! We will look at how the phenomenon of Emoji has taken the Web by storm, explore how people are using Emoji on their favorite platforms and implications. We will also examine how these online platforms are benefiting from Emoji.
Culture
Alolita Sharma

* Type Theory 101

Have you heard about type theory and always wanted to understand the principles behind it, but always thought it was too complicated since it has a lot of Lambda Calculus and algebras? This talk will approach these concepts in a friendly way.
Theory
Hanneli Tavante

* What Hath Von Neumann Wrought? Programming before programming languages

We program today in a rich environment, but that wasn't always the case. We celebrate the pioneers of programming languages: Grace Hopper (COBOL), John Backus (FORTRAN), John McCarthy (LISP), Kenneth Iverson (APL) and Peter Naur (ALGOL). But there was a time before programming languages. How did people program back then? I'll show you!
Theory
M. Edward (Ed) Borasky

Favorite proposals for this user

* Diving into distributed microservices architecture with Kubernetes on AWS and GCE

When designing a reliable solution with lots of moving parts, it's important to look not just into code but in-between code - more at the integration parts of the overall system. In this intense talk you will learn about the variety of real-world important aspects to take into account architecting a flexible microservices based solution. Some of the valuable aspects are environment choices, infrastructure planning, preparation and automation, separation of solution parts into independently deployable services, service discovery, replication, resiliency and many more. You will explore into the practical architecture of Kubernetes, see how to create and configure Kubernetes cluster on AWS and GCE, create and prepare containerized services to be deployed into the cluster.
Practice 2016-04-19 18:25:34 +0000
Alena Hall

* Even Cowboy Coders Get the Site Reliability Blues

The principles behind building reliable distributed systems and gracefully managing changes in them turn out to look a lot like the principles behind building psychologically safe communities. In this talk, I'll explain some of the basic principles behind site reliability engineering and how they relate to feminist and social justice ideas. This talk assumes no prior knowledge of site reliability engineering.
Culture 2016-04-19 22:32:28 +0000
Tim Chevalier

* Explicit is Better Than Implicit: Setting Expectations

Miscommunication, wasted time, hurt feelings: real dangers when communicating with strangers online. As FOSS maintainers and contributors, let's try documenting our communication guidelines the same way we document our code style guidelines.
Culture 2016-04-05 01:48:19 +0000
Trey Hunner

* How I unexpectedly built a monster of an open source project

In 2009, Oh My Zsh was released. It's since become a popular open source tool used by developers around the world. Let's walk through how a really small idea turned into a big project.
Culture 2016-04-11 22:17:44 +0000
Robby Russell

* Lossless Emoji - Doing Emoji Right

Learn how difficult it can be to do emoji right and what you can do to preserve the message and emotions of your users. If you take user input, you owe it to the internet to attend this talk.
Practice 2016-04-13 07:21:09 +0000
Ryan Kennedy

* Open Source Fan Service

What can you do when someone submits a bad patch to your project? To begin, we have to understand why people hunger to contribute code: they're fans. You hurt fans' feelings when you reject their patches, but you hurt your project if you accept them. You can get out of this bind! Give your fans other ways to be recognized. Showcase their plugins in your project’s wiki, or rewrite their patches while giving them credit, or feature their related projects on your site.
Culture 2016-03-26 21:59:46 +0000
A. Jesse Jiryu Davis

* Python Performance Profiling: The Guts And The Glory

Your Python program is too slow, and you need to optimize it. Where do you start? With the right tools, you can optimize your code where it counts. With the Python profiler “Yappi” we’ll learn how to find the maximum performance wins with minimum effort.
Practice 2016-04-17 17:54:28 +0000
A. Jesse Jiryu Davis

Open Source Bridge 2015

Favorite sessions for this user

* Bringing Security to Your Open Source Project

With high profile breaches in open source projects, the issue of security has become one of great import to many people. But many projects, especially smaller ones, are intimidated by the idea of a security audit. This talk will discuss ways for smaller projects to experiment, learn, and even have fun improving their security. No PhDs in security required!
Culture
Terri Oda

* Building Diverse Social Networks

While only a handful of social networks like Dreamwidth and Quirell explicitly prioritize diversity, there are plenty of lessons to learn about what to do — and what not to do — from Facebook, Twitter, and others. Best practices include counter-oppressive politics, embedded in the community guidelines and norms; and the right tools, technologies, and policies. This session will look at what does and doesn't work in a variety of online environments.
Culture
Jon Pincus, Lynn Cyrin

* Community Public Offerings: A New Way to Engage Markets (and Investors) in Oregon

Community Public what? This session will introduce the Community Public Offering - the vehicle for securities crowdfunding enabled by Oregon law this January (2015).
Business
kristin wolff, Simon Love

* Dog Food is for Dogs: Escape the Crate of Your Perspective with User Research

Dogfooding—using your own products—is nice, but is it sufficient to produce good design for people who aren’t you? Our familiarity with our projects and their quirks makes us poor substitutes for users in the wild. So just who are these users, and how do you incorporate them into design and development? In this workshop, we'll explore user experience design and research strategies that will help you design for people who aren’t you.
Cooking
Rachel Shadoan, amelia abreu

* Email as Distributed Protocol Transport: How Meeting Invites Work and Ideas for the Future

Learn how meeting invites work and some crazy other ideas for distributed protocols built on email.
Chemistry
Christine Spang

* Failing With Grace

One of the biggest challenges of building distributed systems is dealing with failure. In this talk we'll explore how distributed systems fail and then once we're good and scared, we'll cover a number of approaches and tools to help you deal with failure.
Cooking
Sean O'Connor

* Funding for Open Source Projects: Is a Universal Basic Income the Solution?

Contributing to open-source projects without worrying about making a living? What sounds like a dream could become a reality with the institution of an economic concept called basic income. The idea is currently being debated in numerous countries. This talk will introduce the concept and outline the possible benefits of basic income for the open source community.
Business
Luc Perkins

* Hacking Minecraft!

Minecraft is an incredibly popular game with developers. I'll give a brief tour of opportunities to practice your craft in the Minecraft world and walkthrough some tutorials using popular open source projects.
Chemistry
Jonan Scheffler

* Hello, my name is __________.

Our personal identity is core to how we perceive ourselves and wish to be seen. All too often, however, applications, databases, and user interfaces are not designed to fully support the diversity of personal and social identities expressed throughout the world.
Cooking
Nova Patch

* Hosting Events that the Whole Community Loves

So, you're responsible for a growing an open source community and you want to ensure it's a friendly place for newcomers and old-timers alike. You want to make sure everyone feels welcome and has access to a variety of events (both on and offline) with content that meets the needs of all of your user base from beginner to advanced. This talk will...
Culture
Meg Hartley

* HTTP Can Do That?!

I have explored weird corners of HTTP -- malformed requests that try to trick a site admin into clicking spam links in 404 logs, an API that responds to POST but not GET, and more. In this talk I'll walk you through those (using Python, netcat, and other tools you might have lying around the house).
Hacks
Sumana Harihareswara

* Leveraging Docker to Enable Learning

When giving workshops or presenting online tutorials, it's frequently the case that the system setup can take longer than the actual learning exercises. Using Docker to provide a learning sandbox solves this problem while avoiding changing the learner's system in potentially destructive ways.
Cooking
Kirsten Hunter

* Male/Female/Othered: Implementing Gender-Inclusiveness in User Data Collection

You want to gather information about your users that you can use to improve their experience and yours. They want their identities to be acknowledged and treated with respect. This talk is about meeting both needs: How to ask about gender in ways that welcome the diversity of reality while still being able to analyze the data you get back. We'll discuss the nature of that challenge, how some major websites address it, and example solutions for different scenarios.
Culture
Finn Ellis, Jonathan Harker

* Morning Keynote — Put Up or Shut Up: An Open Letter to Tech Companies Seeking Diverse Teams

People from marginalized communities struggle to break into tech, clawing our way through a racist, sexist, classist, ableist system only to be fired, quit or just suffer in misery. I’ll explore what it really takes to create a workplace that is truly welcoming of everyone.
Culture
Kronda Adair

* Project Fear

Project fear, not dissimilar to imposter syndrome, tends to affect all project leaders at some point (or many points) in their career. This session will tackle project fear by fully defining it, investigating its roots, noting its symptoms, and ultimately discussing a number of successful coping mechanisms.
Business
Adam Edgerton

* Teaching and managing for technologists

After 15 years or so working as a programmer I made two big changes in my job: first I became a manager, then I started working with college students to help them learn to code. This is a personal story of why that has been some of the most challenging and rewarding work I've ever done.
Culture
Lennon Day-Reynolds

* Troubleshooting In Distributed Systems

The shift to microservice and distributed architectures has made software products more flexible and scalable-- and a lot more complex. With so many moving parts, ephemeral conditions and the spectre of partial failure, it can be much more difficult to pinpoint how and why things break. Learn how Logstash, Elasticsearch and Kibana can be used to monitor healthy systems and investigate issues as they pop up, and what we can do outside of software to improve our process of problem-solving.
Chemistry
Megan Baker

Favorite proposals for this user

* Be careful what you wish for: a successful developer community discouraged away from open source

Let's say you want your freedom-valuing software community to be wildly successful - with lots of user demand, a viable way that people can make money from their work if they want to, a heavily international audience, and lots of young people interested. What happens if you get what you want? I'll explain cultural context from the iOS jailbreaking community that can serve as some interesting early warning signs of problems that could happen in open source.
Business 2015-03-08 08:34:33 +0000
Britta Gustafson

* Business Planning for Improvisors

If you think your business is too small for a plan, or that you’ll come up with one later, this workshop is for you. We’ll use an easy template to help you think and talk about how your business works, and it may even help you see ways to improve it.
Business 2015-03-08 03:39:46 +0000
Maggie Starr

* Continuous Delivery and Large Microservice Architectures: Reflections on Ioncannon

Continuous delivery of a monolith is easy, just automate, automate, automate! But what challenges will you run into applying the same ideas to 300 microservices? Come and find out!
Cooking 2015-02-02 21:50:29 +0000
Kevin Scaldeferri

* Crypto 101

Let's make cryptography less cryptic. This talk would give you a peek into the fun world of ciphers and encryption mechanisms with a basic understanding of the hard problems of mathematics behind the magic.
Chemistry 2015-02-13 16:50:26 +0000
Niharika Kohli

* Dodge Disasters and March to Triumph as a Mentor

Good engineers write good code, but the best engineers raise the skills of their junior colleagues, too. If you're a senior Python engineer, you must learn to mentor new hires. Especially if you’re committed to diversity: mentorship is critical to the careers of women and minorities in tech. I have failed at mentoring, then succeeded. Learn from me and march to mentorship triumph.
Culture 2015-03-08 02:48:41 +0000
A. Jesse Jiryu Davis

* Growing your open source project

Many open source software projects are interested in growing their user and contributor bases, but it can be hard to know where to start. This workshop will cover a number of steps projects can take to be more welcoming. Participants will work through a variety of structured, hands-on activities.
Culture 2015-03-05 03:12:34 +0000
Shauna Gordon-McKeon

* Keep calm, it's reverse engineering time

As developers, sometimes we have to investigate a bug, or add a new feature in a codebase that is completely new to us, often with no one available to ask anything about that code. How can we do this?
Cooking 2015-03-07 10:37:03 +0000
Alissa Bonas

* Onboarding and Mentoring Apprentices

Our work, industry, and culture can benefit from bringing fresh eyes into engineering. I’ve personally heard from many industry veterans that they want to mentor new engineers, but don’t know how to initiate a program or convince an organization that Apprentice engineers will add value to a team. Mentoring is rewarding for the apprentice and the Mentor, and a good mentor is critical for helping new engineers succeed.
Culture 2015-03-08 04:53:31 +0000
Mercedes Coyle

* Performance Testing Crash Course

Take back an understanding of how to automate performance and load testing and evaluate the impact it has on performance and your business.
Cooking 2015-01-28 03:29:29 +0000
Dustin Whittle

* User Style Zen: Balancing Standarization, Customization, and Accessibility

More and more, social media sites are allowing users to customize and style their own profiles and pages. On one hand, this lets people show their individuality and make their mark on their content. On the other, it presents problems for developers who want to make these options available, but have to balance that with site security and usability.
Culture 2015-03-08 04:38:46 +0000
Ruth Hatch