Jessica Canepa's favorites

Favorite sessions for this user

* Bringing non-technical people to the Free/Libre/Open world and why it matters

Software freedom advocates sometimes believe a myth of "trickle-down technology" — that open collaboration and freedom for programmers will somehow lead to more free and open technology for the rest of society. To build technology that truly empowers most people, we need more non-programmers actively involved in development. I'll share my story of how I started as a music teacher and became the co-founder of an ambitious Free/Libre/Open project. We'll discus lessons about outreach to others like me.
Culture
Aaron Wolf

* Build a Web Map with Open Source Tools

Come learn to make a map on the web! In this tutorial, we will build an interactive, data-filled web map using a number of open source tools including Mapbox.js (a JavaScript library based on Leaflet.js). We will cover several options for interactivity and data sources, and show how to integrate with external APIs and other mapping tools.
Cooking
Lyzi Diamond

* Dog Food is for Dogs: Escape the Crate of Your Perspective with User Research

Dogfooding—using your own products—is nice, but is it sufficient to produce good design for people who aren’t you? Our familiarity with our projects and their quirks makes us poor substitutes for users in the wild. So just who are these users, and how do you incorporate them into design and development? In this workshop, we'll explore user experience design and research strategies that will help you design for people who aren’t you.
Cooking
Rachel Shadoan, amelia abreu

* Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Pelican: A Comparison of Static Site Generators

Want to make a static site or blog, but not sure where to start? Tired of using Wordpress and looking for something better? This talk will get into the nitty-gritty details of how Jekyll and Pelican -- two popular static site generators -- work, and explain how to choose which is best for your project. Using examples you can clone from github, we'll cover the pros and cons of both SSGs, discuss things that neither does well, and give you a better idea of how to get your site up and running (with an open source tool!).
Chemistry
Lucy Wyman

* Five years, 1000 students: The story of Open Source Comes to Campus

Since 2010, OpenHatch has been running workshops at college campuses, teaching undergrads how to get involved in open source. In 2015, we expect to reach over 500 students through 25 events. This talk presents how we've the scaled program over the years, how we've evolved our curriculum, and how you can get involved.
Culture
Asheesh Laroia

* Hosting Events that the Whole Community Loves

So, you're responsible for a growing an open source community and you want to ensure it's a friendly place for newcomers and old-timers alike. You want to make sure everyone feels welcome and has access to a variety of events (both on and offline) with content that meets the needs of all of your user base from beginner to advanced. This talk will...
Culture
Meg Hartley

* How to Really Get Git

You already know how to use “git status”, “git push”, and “git add” for your personal projects. You know how to work on a team project with git version control. How do you achieve the next level of git mastery and fix mistakes? We’ll cover how to set up your git environment for a productive workflow, different ways to undo your mistakes in git, and finally, how to use the IPython notebook to automate an entire git workflow.
Hacks
Susan Tan

* How to Teach Git

Version control is a necessary piece of the open source community and git has an unfortunately steep learning curve. Here is what I have learned from teaching git to beginners, so you don’t have to make the same mistakes.
Chemistry
Georgia Reh

* Introduction to data munging with pandas and IPython Notebook

This talk will go over importing, exploring, and exporting your data, and common issues you may encounter.
Cooking
Meli Lewis

* Making the web fun again

When Geocities shut down, it did much more than delete a bunch of obnoxious dancing baby GIFs and Limp Bizkit MIDI files. It deleted the ability for people to easily create web sites, and learn how to be in complete control of the content and presentation they provide to their audience. To the economically and socially disenfranchised, it was a disaster that prevented countless people from learning programming. So we brought it back, and open sourced the entire thing (including our financial data). Leave your nostalgia at the door - let us show you our efforts to pave a better future for tech startups, the tech community, and the future of the web itself.
Culture
Kyle Drake, Victoria Wang

* Micropub: The Emerging API Standard for IndieWeb Apps

Micropub is an emerging open API standard that is used to create posts on your own domain using third-party apps. Web apps and mobile apps can use Micropub to post notes, photos, bookmarks and many other kinds of posts to your own website, similar to using a Twitter client to post to your Twitter account.
Chemistry
Aaron Parecki

* Morning Keynote — Put Up or Shut Up: An Open Letter to Tech Companies Seeking Diverse Teams

People from marginalized communities struggle to break into tech, clawing our way through a racist, sexist, classist, ableist system only to be fired, quit or just suffer in misery. I’ll explore what it really takes to create a workplace that is truly welcoming of everyone.
Culture
Kronda Adair

* On-device, open source mobile vector rendering of OpenStreetMap

Learn about the moving pieces of Mapbox GL, an open source framework for rendering beautiful maps based on OpenStreetMap-based data on Android and iOS. Find out what goes into making completely configurable world maps that are always up to date and always available in your pocket.
Chemistry
Justin Miller

* Removing Barriers: Ascend Project Post Mortem

Last year the Ascend Project was announced, then in the fall the first pilot took place in Portland. This year we'll report back on how it went, hear from participants, and break down what worked and what could be changed for future versions of this type of program. You'll definitely come away with some ideas for your next learning event, code school, or sponsored training.
Hacks
Lukas Blakk, Kronda Adair

* So how do you reach every person on the planet: Internationalization at Twitter

Twitter is the world’s most popular platform which enables users to create and share ideas and information instantly, without barriers. In order to fulfill this mission, it has to provide language support for every person seamlessly. This talk will walk through Twitter’s open source language libraries, internationalization and localization standards and technologies.
Chemistry
Alolita Sharma

* The Open Source Writing Stack

Open source makes writing and publishing much easier both online and in print — provided you know what tools to use. This talk covers those tools (from LaTeX to WordPress) and how to choose between them.
Hacks
Thursday Bram

* The Public Library As An (Almost) Open Source Institution

Your public library can be one of your best allies for creating, distributing, and promoting Open Source ideas and projects. They want to help - they just need to know how.
Culture
Alex Byrne

* Tricking Out the Terminal: An Introduction

A beginner-focused overview of the particulars and pitfalls of the command line and several common shells, with a focus on improving developer workflows, exposing common default tools, implementing useful open-source tools, and inserting emoji into prompts (pretty much the best part of customizing the terminal).
Chemistry
Lydia Katsamberis

* User Research For Non-Researchers

User research doesn't have to be time-consuming, elaborate, or performed by a UX professional. If you're willing to talk to a few strangers, you can do user research. In this presentation, I'll talk about how to do lightweight research on any product or topic, no matter what your background and training are. I'll focus on the most effective tools for quick research, and some of the common pitfalls for novice researchers.
Cooking
Jane Davis

* Write It Down: Process Documentation from the Ground Up

The collective knowledge base of an organization can be difficult to crack. Some things have "always been done that way" but no one knows why. This talk will help to expose those undocumented corners of your project, and give you tools for writing process documentation for new contributors using lessons from Not-For-Profit organizations.
Culture
Kat Toomajian

* You, Too, Can Contribute to Open Source!

Are you curious about contributing to Open Source but don't know where to start? Learn how we became Open Source contributors, most recently with Outreach Program internships with Humanitarian OpenStreetMap Team (HOT) and Mozilla. Come learn how you can get started too.
Culture
Jessica Canepa, Barbara Miller, Adam Okoye

Favorite proposals for this user

* 5 Things I Wish Someone Told Me Before I Started Programming

There's more to being a successful developer than simply being great at programming.
Culture 2015-02-03 05:55:25 +0000
Kerri Miller

* 90 writing tips in 45 minutes

Almost every job involves a little writing, even if it's code comments or repair notes on a car. But what if you don't feel confident with writing? I have a rapid-fire presentation of writing tips and tricks that can help get you started, keep you going, and make your work better, even if you don't think you're a writer, I bet it will help!
Hacks 2015-01-20 02:50:35 +0000
Heidi Waterhouse

* Better Project Planning Through User Story Mapping

Learn how to improve your agile development process through User Story Mapping, a technique that you can use to gather requirements easier, get everyone on the same page, and plan out what needs to be done while keeping the "big picture" in mind.
Business 2015-02-09 21:42:45 +0000
Andrew Havens

* Bringing Open Source to the Federal Government

The story of how one federal agency decided to start living open source principles, built great tools, and attracted great developer talent.
Culture 2015-02-06 17:08:49 +0000
Bruce Arthur

* Engaging Nepali Kids with Free Software

Last year, I spent six months volunteering with a Nepali educational non-profit called Open Learning Exchange, which develops interactive educational activities for OLPC laptops used by students in elementary schools. During my talk, I will share my experience about what free software can do to provide better educational opportunities in these schools that lack resources and governmental support we take for granted.
Culture 2015-02-19 09:04:58 +0000
Martin Dluhoš

* Failure for Fun and Profit!

Do you actually know how to deliberately acquire, sharpen, and retain a technical skill?
Culture 2015-02-19 18:17:27 +0000
Kerri Miller

* Growing your open source project

Many open source software projects are interested in growing their user and contributor bases, but it can be hard to know where to start. This workshop will cover a number of steps projects can take to be more welcoming. Participants will work through a variety of structured, hands-on activities.
Culture 2015-03-05 03:12:34 +0000
Shauna Gordon-McKeon

* How to Get a Software Job without Experience

Getting your first job is a Catch-22: to get a job, you need experience; to get experience, you need a job. Or do you?
Culture 2015-03-05 04:48:38 +0000
Charles Anderson

* Intermediate Bash

Level up your command line skills. Get tips for moving beyond mere proficiency at the command line.
Hacks 2015-03-06 08:56:55 +0000
Amy Boyle

* Patches: Stories of Open Source

Open source software is awesome. It provides the tools for our jobs, our hobbies, and our dreams. And anyone can contribute! Despite that openness, though, I hesitated for years before getting involved.
Culture 2015-01-17 00:36:36 +0000
Jason Clark

* Sass: What It Is, How It's Used, and Why It's So Syntactically Awesome

This talk will start off with the basics of what Syntactically Awesome StyleSheets are, what features and functionality they have to offer, and why they're a great tool to have in your arsenal. We'll then delve into how to use Sass in developing your own sites and what tools you'll want to use alongside it, complete with a live demo and some in-production examples.
Cooking 2015-02-13 20:41:18 +0000
Lucy Wyman

* Sharing Economy: Setting the foundation of the future economy

Sharing Economy has the potential to move the world towards sustainability and circular design. But what if we get it wrong? What if we the people don't participate in setting and maintaining the foundation of this future economy?
Culture 2015-01-27 11:03:11 +0000
aleksandr tsukanov

* So You Want To Write A Tech Article

Have you ever said, “I could write an article about that!”? Imagine what it feels like to walk into Barnes & Noble, pick up a magazine and see your article featured right there on the cover. Who do you contact? What's the process? What the heck is step one? In this talk, you'll get an insider's look at breaking into the mysterious world of tech article writing, from an industry veteran.
Hacks 2015-03-04 17:06:42 +0000
Rob Reilly

* The Leap: Building Something Cool as a Beginner

The leap from learning to doing in programming can be terrifying. One hundred step-by-step tutorials will not teach you as much as solving one tough problem in code. This talk will present a process for taking that leap. And I’ll show you how I used that process to build a software plugin that lets you program in plain English.
Hacks 2015-03-07 22:06:13 +0000
Stephanie Losi

* Web Applications and a Brighter Future for Open Source Adoption

In this talk, we discuss how web applications changed expectations of both sysadmins and end users, and what open source projects and organizations can do to help open source thrive in the web ecosystem. Attend and you’ll see a brief reminder of how web apps changed the developer-user relationship in open source, how some open source web app communities have reacted, what tools exist to get past the hosting barrier, and how your open source web app project can thrive.
Business 2015-03-07 06:33:38 +0000
Philip James

* Why nobody cares about your GitHub project

Open source is hard. Everybody tells you to create a GitHub account and start throwing your code out there. Once you do, you realize that nobody really cares. In this talk, we'll see what you can do to increase the visibility of your work and how this can dramatically affect the quality of your project.
Chemistry 2015-02-24 15:16:27 +0000
Zeno Rocha