Philip James's favorites

Favorite sessions for this user

* A Developer's-Eye View of API Client Libraries

A developer's experience of an API and its client libraries can make the difference between them building on a project and giving up in frustration. If you develop an API client library, you'll learn what you can do to get it out of the way so developers can spend mental energy on putting together exciting projects, not fighting with tools. If you work with web APIs, you'll learn about factors to consider when you're choosing a framework to use. Either way, you'll learn about best practices--code-related and not--that make the difference between fun and easy development and a frustrating slog.
Cooking
Frances Hocutt

* Bridging the Digital Divide with SMS Bots

We all know about Twitter and IRC bots, but with about 4/5 of people worldwide without smartphones SMS has the potential to reach those left behind the digital divide. We will discuss the various methods for developing an SMS bot, the legal and ethical implications of doing so, and we will build an SMS bot live.
Cooking
Briar Schreiber

* Bringing non-technical people to the Free/Libre/Open world and why it matters

Software freedom advocates sometimes believe a myth of "trickle-down technology" — that open collaboration and freedom for programmers will somehow lead to more free and open technology for the rest of society. To build technology that truly empowers most people, we need more non-programmers actively involved in development. I'll share my story of how I started as a music teacher and became the co-founder of an ambitious Free/Libre/Open project. We'll discus lessons about outreach to others like me.
Culture
Aaron Wolf

* Build a Web Map with Open Source Tools

Come learn to make a map on the web! In this tutorial, we will build an interactive, data-filled web map using a number of open source tools including Mapbox.js (a JavaScript library based on Leaflet.js). We will cover several options for interactivity and data sources, and show how to integrate with external APIs and other mapping tools.
Cooking
Lyzi Diamond

* Building Diverse Social Networks

While only a handful of social networks like Dreamwidth and Quirell explicitly prioritize diversity, there are plenty of lessons to learn about what to do — and what not to do — from Facebook, Twitter, and others. Best practices include counter-oppressive politics, embedded in the community guidelines and norms; and the right tools, technologies, and policies. This session will look at what does and doesn't work in a variety of online environments.
Culture
Jon Pincus, Lynn Cyrin

* Building mentoring into an open source community that welcomes and values new contributors

This session will talk about how to integrate mentoring into all the different layers of an open source project. This involves a change in the whole community which treats new contributors with respect, knowing they have something valuable to contribute to the project.
Culture
Cathy Theys

* Consequences of an Insightful Algorithm

We have ethical responsibilities when coding. We're able to extract remarkably precise intuitions about an individual. But do we have a right to know what they didn't consent to share, even when they willingly shared the data that leads us there? How do we mitigate against unintended outcomes? In this talk, we'll learn how to build in systematic empathy, integrate practices for examining how our code might harm individuals, and net consequences that can be better for everyone.
Culture
Carina C. Zona

* Developer and the DOM - A history of manipulation and abstraction

As web developers we see a variety of tools evolve every year that all claim to be the future of web development, but few people are as excited to explore the past. In this talk we’ll trace the lineage of the contemporary web landscape back to the advent of the DOM and the first browser javascript API. In doing so we hope to illuminate an often overlooked historical perspective on web development and explain why frameworks like React and Angular came into existence and why today is an exciting time to be working with the browser.
Chemistry
Zachary Michael, Gregory Noack

* Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Pelican: A Comparison of Static Site Generators

Want to make a static site or blog, but not sure where to start? Tired of using Wordpress and looking for something better? This talk will get into the nitty-gritty details of how Jekyll and Pelican -- two popular static site generators -- work, and explain how to choose which is best for your project. Using examples you can clone from github, we'll cover the pros and cons of both SSGs, discuss things that neither does well, and give you a better idea of how to get your site up and running (with an open source tool!).
Chemistry
Lucy Wyman

* Economics of Volunteer Labor: Three stories from Debian

What circumstances allow volunteer projects to flourish? This talk covers three examples in Debian, diving deep into the questions like whose permission is required, what technical background is needed, and more, to highlight lessons of that can help any open source community organize its activities to empower volunteers.
Culture
Asheesh Laroia

* Email as Distributed Protocol Transport: How Meeting Invites Work and Ideas for the Future

Learn how meeting invites work and some crazy other ideas for distributed protocols built on email.
Chemistry
Christine Spang

* Five years, 1000 students: The story of Open Source Comes to Campus

Since 2010, OpenHatch has been running workshops at college campuses, teaching undergrads how to get involved in open source. In 2015, we expect to reach over 500 students through 25 events. This talk presents how we've the scaled program over the years, how we've evolved our curriculum, and how you can get involved.
Culture
Asheesh Laroia

* How the Internet Works

The Internet runs the world; it connects our devices, powers our businesses, and even talks to our thermostats. But how does it all happen? We will follow an adventurous young web browser from the moment a hapless user presses "enter" and witness the trials and tribulations of many packets. Ride alongside the most fearsome syscalls as we learn how the Internet works!
Chemistry
Noah Kantrowitz

* How to Really Get Git

You already know how to use “git status”, “git push”, and “git add” for your personal projects. You know how to work on a team project with git version control. How do you achieve the next level of git mastery and fix mistakes? We’ll cover how to set up your git environment for a productive workflow, different ways to undo your mistakes in git, and finally, how to use the IPython notebook to automate an entire git workflow.
Hacks
Susan Tan

* Humanising Math and Physics on Computer Science

There are some myths around Science - it's boring, useless, difficult. Many of them are heard while we are young, and many people tend to take then for the entire life. Science is very important, specially on Computer Science and Engineering, for building the basis of our logical thinking.
Culture
Hanneli Tavante

* Internet of Things Militia: Paramilitary Training for your IoT devices

Security folk generally talk about how the Internet of Things is bad for security, but it also brings new sensors and connected devices that could co-operate in new and interesting ways. Could we use internet things to enhance security?
Hacks
Terri Oda

* Introduction to data munging with pandas and IPython Notebook

This talk will go over importing, exploring, and exporting your data, and common issues you may encounter.
Cooking
Meli Lewis

* Making the web fun again

When Geocities shut down, it did much more than delete a bunch of obnoxious dancing baby GIFs and Limp Bizkit MIDI files. It deleted the ability for people to easily create web sites, and learn how to be in complete control of the content and presentation they provide to their audience. To the economically and socially disenfranchised, it was a disaster that prevented countless people from learning programming. So we brought it back, and open sourced the entire thing (including our financial data). Leave your nostalgia at the door - let us show you our efforts to pave a better future for tech startups, the tech community, and the future of the web itself.
Culture
Kyle Drake, Victoria Wang

* Open source collaboration for tackling real world environmental problems

Public Lab is a two-part project -- an attempt at large-scale community environmental monitoring, AND a massively distributed R&D lab for inventing new monitoring techniques and equipment. The community has grown a lot over the past five years, and we are here to share stories of -- and welcome you to -- an emerging FOSS culture that spans hardware, software, data, community organizing, and advocacy.
Culture
Dana Bauer, Mathew Lippincott

* Opening Up The Current Open Source Blueprint

Accessibility, diversity, and open source holding itself accountable to its own standards of what it means to be an open community.
Culture
Stephanie Morillo

* Probably

If you want to understand probability better (and you should), this is the talk for you.
Chemistry
Bart Massey

* Reinventing black boxes

Open source has a long history of reimplementing, and reverse engineering proprietary tools. This talk will integrate the tools needed to reverse engineer into stories of how it has been done before.
Hacks
Daniel Johnson

* The Open Source Writing Stack

Open source makes writing and publishing much easier both online and in print — provided you know what tools to use. This talk covers those tools (from LaTeX to WordPress) and how to choose between them.
Hacks
Thursday Bram

* Tricking Out the Terminal: An Introduction

A beginner-focused overview of the particulars and pitfalls of the command line and several common shells, with a focus on improving developer workflows, exposing common default tools, implementing useful open-source tools, and inserting emoji into prompts (pretty much the best part of customizing the terminal).
Chemistry
Lydia Katsamberis

* What is LocalWiki, and why is it so much fun? Let's edit it!

LocalWiki, a very friendly and inclusive cousin of Wikipedia, is a project hosting region-specific open-content wikis where a community can write about local topics in as much detail as they like. I've had a ton of fun with this recently, and I'd like to explain to you why you might like it too! We can work on some first edits together.
Culture
Britta Gustafson

* Why Relationships Matter in Community Building: Experiences from the Philippine Cultural Heritage Mapping Project

What makes a successful project? It's not only a solid idea, firm execution and attention to the numbers. It's also successfully building working relationships between community members. This presentation will explore how one of Wikimedia Philippines' biggest projects was successful in large part to how the organization engaged its participants, and ultimately how they have come to be part of the wider Filipino Wikimedia community.
Culture
Josh Lim

* Write It Down: Process Documentation from the Ground Up

The collective knowledge base of an organization can be difficult to crack. Some things have "always been done that way" but no one knows why. This talk will help to expose those undocumented corners of your project, and give you tools for writing process documentation for new contributors using lessons from Not-For-Profit organizations.
Culture
Kat Toomajian

* Your Job is Political: Tech Money in Politics

As much as the personal is political, the old-fashioned political still is too, and companies and individuals made rich by the tech industry and by open source software have been making increasingly direct monetary incursions into U.S. politics. Let's take a look at what policies & politicians our bosses, investors, users and contributors are buying at the local and state levels, with a specific focus on current changes in education policy and future moves in law enforcement.
Business
Kelsey Gilmore-Innis