Alex Byrne's favorites

Open Source Bridge 2017

Favorite proposals for this user

* #workzoneWTF: crowdsourcing policy change in PDX

Walk or ride your bike around Portland long enough and you'll come across unsafe sidewalk and road closures. To paint a clear picture of this issue, Oregon Walks and The Street Trust (BTA) ran a social media campaign collecting hundreds of photos and videos from citizens using a little tech sauce we whipped up. The pressure was on for City Hall to pass new closure requirements, which they did unanimously. This talk covers the people, the methods, and the open tech used to help move the needle.
Activism 2017-03-29 02:06:41 +0000
Tim Welch

* 100 Days of Creativity

People often claim you can't schedule creativity, or blithely claim anyone can learn to be creative, without actually consistently doing it themselves. In this talk, Aaron Parecki will describe how (and why) he decided to take on not one, but two 100-day projects: creating 100 pieces of music, as well as making 100 IndieWeb improvements for 100 days in a row. Aaron will show how he was able to stay focused, prioritize, as well as the challenges he encountered along the way.
Practice 2017-03-31 23:17:53 +0000
Aaron Parecki

* 24 Hours of Awesome: Science Hack Day Portland

Science Hack Day is a free-to-attend, open-source, worldwide, volunteer-organized event aimed at bringing together scientists, developers, engineers, students, and anyone else passionate or curious about science. The goal is simple: in 24 hours form a team and make something (fun, useful, nonsensical, anything!) with science. Hear from the organizers of the first Science Hack Day in Portland on how it was put together, just how awesome it was, and how open (science, source, hardware, web) played a vital part.
Culture 2017-03-31 17:44:16 +0000
Jessica Hardwicke, Lilly Winfree

* Be(come) a Mentor! Help Others Succeed!

There is always something new to learn in technology. We are always experts in one and beginners in another field. In order to learn successfully it’s important to have a mentor but it’s equally important to learn how to be a good mentor.
Practice 2017-03-22 11:07:03 +0000
Anna Ossowski

* Become a Rocket Scientist With Open Source

The new space industry is expanding rapidly, with huge opportunities for open-source contributions. This talk focuses on the case study of Asterank, software that makes space data easier to access and explore. Its analysis and visualization tools have been used in government, private industry, and schools. The project has made public space data more open and usable for millions of people.
Hacks 2017-03-17 19:14:05 +0000
Ian Webster

* Building #Resist at Meetup: Actual Corporate Activism in the Age of Trump

Learn how Meetup made the decision to create #Resist, a free network of over 1000 Meetups worldwide that anyone could organize with or join, and the questions we had to ask about how a private company could help self-empower the public in an actual way.
Activism 2017-03-31 14:24:19 +0000
Yanyi .

* Coding as a Filthy Casual

I’ve been coding with Python since I was 6. I don’t take it very seriously, and I don’t do amazing things with it. And that’s an important perspective to have, to not get too caught up with work.
Practice 2017-04-06 23:13:43 +0000
Sebastian Waterhouse

* Customize the Ubuntu Desktop: Hacks, Apps and Snaps.

Do you use Ubuntu on your desktop, and want to make the desktop even more exciting? This talk will go over the basic ways to add additional features to the desktop, as well as showcase the current set of features you can utilize that will enhance the desktop you use daily!
Hacks 2017-04-02 03:38:16 +0000
Philip Ballew

* De Falsis Deis: Social Contracts

Social engineering; it's a little more common and complicated than you might think. Wherever people live and work together, a social contract is formed. First theorized by Socrates and further expanded by Tom Hobbes, John Locke and Jean-Jacques Rousseau, this system is so fundamental most people take part in it unwittingly. Social hackers can use this to their advantage - and by breaking the social contract, we are all left vulnerable to attack. In this talk I will discuss how social contracts develop and how hackers use this natural human behavior against their targets.
Theory 2017-04-02 22:25:57 +0000
Tiberius Hefflin

* Decoding the history of codes

The word "code" means different things to different people. In this talk, we explore cryptography and how it's evolved over time. We look at some key historical events and see how the art of encryption affected our lives.
Theory 2017-03-22 02:51:15 +0000
Niharika Kohli

* Democratizing Data: What You Need to Know as a Developer to Keep Your Data Collection and Usage Ethical

By 2020 each person will create 1.7 MB of new data per second flooding us in 44 trillion GB of data! What’s this mean? From Uber’s “ride of shame” scandal to the role of Facebook’s news recommender in the presidential election we as developers must ask how we use data and what the implications are for open source software.
Activism 2017-03-31 14:14:04 +0000
Lorena Mesa

* Digital Activism at Government Scale

Government is huge, slow, and wasteful. You try to use its services, but they’re not doing what they were meant to. _You know_ how to make broken systems work. Join government to solve problems for everyone. … especially under an Administration you oppose.
Activism 2017-04-01 06:37:15 +0000
Yoz Grahame

* Diversity in Open Source Communities

This talk is about "Why diversity is important part of open source communities culture. How to make your Open Source project and community diverse and inclusive, so that everyone feels good about joining. Different ways to be more inclusive and welcoming."
Culture 2017-04-06 06:52:02 +0000
Amita Sharma

* Emacs's org-mode: a writing and organizing multitool

This talk will present org-mode, a package for the emacs editor, as a tool useful for everything from writing talks, to keeping a journal, organizing your todos, and developing literate code
Hacks 2017-03-31 19:09:47 +0000
Clarissa Littler

* Failing Well

It's a fact of life--software breaks. But all is not doom and gloom. How we detect and handle errors drastically impacts the quality of both our systems and our lives. Knowing what to track, when to page, and how to find system weaknesses is critical.
Practice 2017-03-31 17:30:23 +0000
Jason Clark

* Fake Science! Sad! A case study of the perils of Open Data

Open source allows anyone to use their skills to change the world--for better or for worse. In an era where the phrase "Fake News!" echoes from the highest office of the land, we have to cast a critical eye on the works that we promote and participate in. Open Data is no exception, and the use of Open Data to generate Fake Analyses is a real issue that can undermine social progress.
Activism 2017-04-01 02:36:00 +0000
Emily Gorcenski

* Falsehoods Programmers Believe About (Human) Languages - Common pitfalls in interface translation

Making open source software translatable is easy, right? You just take out all the strings, put them in a translation file in your git repository, and start accepting pull requests. Simple! Well, not so fast. There’s a lot more to this than meets the eye, and if you take a quick and dirty approach you’ll end up with upset translators, complaints from users, and mysteries like “what is ١٢٬٣٤٥٬٦٧٨ and why does my code want to parse that as a number?”. Thankfully, there are open source resources and libraries that can take care of these things for you.
Practice 2017-04-01 04:17:21 +0000
Roan Kattouw

* From the mouth of a child: A young hacker’s perspective on Open Source culture

I've been around Open Source my entire life. As a young FOSS dev, I've grown up looking at the community from the perspective that this is "my people". This talk looks at some of what I can definitively say are victories, a retrospective of two decades of lessons learned, and finally some challenges our community faces.
Culture 2017-03-10 01:42:02 +0000
Morgan Gangwere

* Futel: The Network We Deserve

Futel has provided free public telephone service, telephone-mediated art, and live human interaction for several years, and was recognized as Portland's most prolific payphone installer of 2016. Now that we are finally living in the cyberpunk dystopia promised in the 80s, we are poised to seize this moment.
Activism 2017-03-31 06:40:34 +0000
Karl Anderson

* G-code: the assembly of 3D printing

A brief exploration of g-code, the family of low level languages that describe the physical process of running the 3D printer or CNC mill, from a programmer's perspective
Theory 2017-03-31 18:52:26 +0000
Clarissa Littler

* Geek Choir

In this session, we explore ways to improve team cohesion, cooperation, connection, and presence for each other via song.
Culture 2017-04-01 04:39:32 +0000
Michael Alan Brewer

* Grassroots activism is hard. Can open source help?

Grassroots activists have to deal with many challenges - including the tools they’re using. Sounds like a great opportunity for open source! This session will survey progressive and transpartisan grassroots activists’ needs and today’s solutions (including techniques that work for explicitly intersectional groups), look at some existing open-source offerings and how they could evolve to better meet grassroots activists’ needs, and identify future directions that could be even more impactful.
Activism 2017-04-01 04:32:17 +0000
Jon Pincus

* Hack Harassment: a New Initiative to Enable Communities to Reduce Online Harassment

In this presentation, we will present the methodology used to create a harassment dataset and classifier, the dataset used to help the system learn what harassment looks like, along with a call to action for anyone interested to get involved with the project directly.
Activism 2017-03-27 21:17:25 +0000
George Kennedy

* How Can I Contribute?

This talk is for you, the documentarian, developer, student, or community member wondering what you can contribute to open source and how to get started. Lucy Wyman discusses several ways open source projects need your help, what to look for in a project you're contributing to, and some first steps to making your first pull request.
Culture 2017-03-07 17:36:49 +0000
Lucy Wyman

* How does a Computer _Really_ Work?

By thinking and exploring how to _program_ a simple computer, we learn how to _think_ like a computer, and this may help us become better programmers.
Hacks 2017-03-31 23:48:41 +0000
Howard Abrams

* How I Went From Newbie to Open Source Project Owner

This is the story of how focusing first on building a community of individuals who care about mentoring has allowed me to turn the idea of mentor matching for people learning to code into a multi-platform open source project.
Culture 2017-03-09 14:20:14 +0000
Kim Crayton

* How Open Source Audiovisual Tools Help Archivists (And You Too!)

This talk will hype several "homemade" open source video tools specific to the audiovisual digital preservation field built on broadly-used existing open source tools such as FFmpeg and mediainfo. We will discuss how these communities have grown to benefit the field of archiving and how we've grown to be able to give back to the main communities.
Practice 2017-03-27 19:25:32 +0000
Ashley Blewer, Andrew Weaver

* How To Mentor Humans

I feel passionately that women and epecially minority women in tech need mentors and that those already in tech have a duty to step up for them, even though it means getting out of their comfort zone. How do you mentor minorities? How do you mentor anyone? With kindness and respect.
Culture 2017-03-30 00:04:26 +0000
Letta Raven

* How to Pay People for Their Work

Paying people for their work is radical, whether we're talking about open source contributions, second-shift diversity work, or even care at home. But giving people the resources necessary to make these community contributions is the only way to make our communities more sustainable.
Culture 2017-03-31 05:33:20 +0000
Thursday Bram

* How to Prototype and User Test: A Workshop

Prototype early and test often! Learn how to brainstorm an idea, create a simple paper prototype, and conduct some guerilla user tests.
Practice 2017-03-28 22:27:45 +0000
morgan miller

* I Have ADD and So Can -- Ooh, Shiny!

Neurodiversity is the hidden diversity on our teams. Unlike obvious external markers, mental and personality quirks or invisible disabilities are not always easy for us to remember or adjust for. But sometimes diversity in this area is as important as any other.
Culture 2017-04-01 02:00:17 +0000
Heidi Waterhouse

* Importance of communication (Effective Communication) in Open Source communities

Open Source communities are excellent example of most diverse and globally spread work-space. Although, this is a major plus and feels amazing to work in such a diverse culture, but at the same time we need to face the challenge of accurate communication.
Culture 2017-04-06 06:34:24 +0000
Amita Sharma

* In 1968 Mom built a computer: women's routes as technologists

On the surface, this story shares vignettes about my Mom. But its purpose is to increase awareness of human resources in technology, and overlooked pathways of young technologiests. "c. 1973 RCA hired her for the chip prototyping lab. Her new co-workers compared each other's crochet at lunch. A marathon week of late-night needlework bought her acceptance and promotion to supervisor. She told me stories about the ladies who wrapped wires for NASA a few years before, about women's centuries of fingers in technical fiber-crafts finally being noticed when it put men on the moon."
Culture 2017-04-01 05:15:03 +0000
Katheryn Sutter

* IndieWeb 101: owning your content and identity

The IndieWeb strives to create an alternative to content silos and the 'corporate web'. This is achieved through creating a single source of truth for your content and identity aka a personal domain. Let's explore the ramifications of this and answer any questions you might have together!
Activism 2017-03-27 21:45:45 +0000
Wm Salt Hale

* It Can't Happen Here: But what if it does? Open-source alternative communication infrastructure

This talk will focus on what happens when the internet infrastructure we know and love goes down - by natural disaster or human-instigated shutdown (think Mubarak in Egypt during the Arab Spring).
Activism 2017-04-05 08:43:12 +0000
jenka soderberg

* Keepassing your credentials synced and under control

Do you use the same few passwords over and over? Is there a piece of paper with hard-to-remember ones somewhere? How about a file that lives on five different devices and is never up-to-date? Even the most secure passwords can be broken with a $5 wrench. Long forgotten websites are frequently compromised. Files can be stored in The Cloud, but is that really where such sensitive data should be?
Practice 2017-03-27 21:41:52 +0000
Wm Salt Hale

* Keeping Secrets On Remote Machines

Conventional wisdom says that using the cloud means giving up privacy and control. But maybe crypto is actually literally magic and we can have our cake and eat it too? We're mostly not there yet, but let's talk about some of the ways that we're getting close.
Theory 2017-04-01 01:25:22 +0000
Erica Portnoy

* Learn to Type at 250 WPM Using Open Source Tools

The Open Steno Project is dedicated to the creation of open source software, hardware, and educational materials to bring machine stenography to the masses! Want to be a speed demon typist like the court reporters you see in movies? Now you can!
Practice 2017-03-31 23:50:35 +0000
Josh Lifton

* Liar Liar Pants on Fire: Being a Kid in the Tech World

A year and 4 months ago, I turned thirteen. According to many sites I use, however, I turned twenty-six. It’s a little odd, so here’s why:
Culture 2017-04-06 22:54:14 +0000
Sebastian Waterhouse

* Making MLIS Classrooms Open Source: Activism, Service Learning, and Building Digital Community Archives

This presentation explores an ongoing project to incorporate digital repository building for community archives within a master's level library and information sciences classroom. The class taught under the pedagogical methods of service learning highlighted (and continues to highlight) the complex relationship between proprietary technology and archival 'best practices.' By reimagining this relationship, students were able to look at how open source tools and technologies better accomplished their desired outcomes to build a small-scale repository for their community partner, one whose narratives and materials were representative of feminist activism in the American South.
Activism 2017-03-30 14:29:20 +0000
Travis Wagner, Elise Lewis

* Making your app Password-Free

Learn how to make security easy by eliminating passwords for your app entirely with magic link based authentication!
Practice 2017-03-31 16:30:16 +0000
Eric Mann

* Modern Keyboarding: How to Design, Build, and Hack

See how easy and cheap it is to design and build your own ergonomic keyboard with open hardware and software.
Practice 2017-03-31 02:34:15 +0000
Micah Elliott

* Nice 'Gestures' via FOSS and ML

While movies like Harry Potter and Iron Man taught us many things, the only lesson that stood out for me was "there are really cool ways to interact with things around us". A missing piece of the puzzle to convert our hands into wands is gestures. There has been an incredible rise in the number and types of proprietary products for virtual reality, augmented reality and smart home systems in the last couple of years. However, the corporate atmosphere and market competition has stymied the true potential of such devices and they often restrict users, developers and hackers to a particular platform. I believe FOSS, a place where collaboration over competition is the driving force, is the key to 'alohomora' the doors to the next level of HCI. I hope you'll join me as I talk about one step in this direction!
Hacks 2017-04-01 06:39:56 +0000
Mayank Sharma

* No Coding Skills Required: How to Contribute to Open Source in Other Ways

You always wanted to contribute to Open Source but you don’t know how to code (yet)? Or maybe you can but you simply want to contribute in other ways? The goal of this talk is to explore how you can use your skills and contribute to Open Source in ways that don’t involve writing code.
Practice 2017-03-22 11:16:33 +0000
Anna Ossowski

* Non-programming ways to contribute to a FOSS project

Open Source world is really fascinating and almost everyone wants to join and contribute to FOSS. Though many of us may know one or more programming languages here and do coding but, there are many people, who love to contribute in open source ,but are non-coders.
Culture 2017-04-06 06:40:29 +0000
Amita Sharma

* Onboarding is Unboxing

A great product has a built-in “unboxing” planned from the start. It never leaves customers thinking about how to do something or figure it out. The funny thing about the companies that make those product experiences is that they usually don't give the same treatment to their employees. Let's start thinking of onboarding as unboxing - and start thinking of our team members as humans!
Culture 2017-03-31 02:11:27 +0000
Kristen Gallagher

* Open Source Security for Activists: Changing the world and staying safe

Staying safe in dangerous times is no easy task, especially when you're speaking the truth to power. Despite giving a voice to millions, the internet is now also a place of danger for those who try to use it to amplify those voices and make them heard. I'll be talking about by my experiences as a Nonprofit Security Advisor using Open Source tools and knowledge to help keep activists safe at the coalface.
Activism 2017-04-01 01:52:51 +0000
Chris Daley

* Out of the Game: How Apps Fail Oppressed Users (and what you can do to help)

Apps and websites routinely expose user information in service of social and interactive goals. But what happens when your user has a stalker? Many of these services will compromise the safety of users who are already at risk. Making things worse, some developers resist making changes, with justifications such as "If someone's in that much danger, they shouldn't be doing anything online," and "It's basically impossible to defend against a state actor." This overview will help developers take the risk factors into account, and make development decisions that puts control back into the hands of the users. There's no way to perfectly remove the risk of going online if you're in danger, but people will go online anyway. Many more users at risk are facing technically naive attackers than are facing highly skilled attackers such as state actors.
Activism 2017-03-31 05:29:30 +0000
Azure Jane Lunatic, Alex Byrne

* Privacy, Security and Crayons - Security Concepts for Kids

Security and Privacy are difficult enough concepts for adults, trying to frame them for children and young adults can feel impossible. In this talk, I will look at security and privacy topics, ways to protect against them and some examples of how to best frame this information for a younger audience.
Culture 2017-04-02 22:16:33 +0000
Tiberius Hefflin

* Rack 'em, Stack 'em Web Apps

While Rails is the undisputed king of Ruby web frameworks, it’s not the only option. Rack is a simple, elegant HTTP library for small Ruby web applications. This makes it ideal for microservices and applications where performance is a must.
Theory 2017-03-31 17:27:10 +0000
Jason Clark

* Remotely Control This Browser: WebDriver and the Path to an Interoperable Web

Browser automation based on the WebDriver standard is a key step toward web compatibility happiness. Automating all browsers consistently is an interesting challenge. In this session you'll learn how WebDriver is built into Firefox, why that makes the web better for everyone, and how you can get involved.
Theory 2017-03-31 15:22:28 +0000
Maja Frydrychowicz

* Security, Privacy, and Open Silicon

Threats to personal information security and privacy are proliferating at a rapid pace, as are countermeasures based on open hardware. This talk will review the open hardware information security landscape, from personal password managers and cloud devices to alternative processors that are open all the way down to the transistor level, with a focus on how open silicon is poised to change everything.
Activism 2017-03-31 23:44:24 +0000
Josh Lifton

* self.care(): Optimizing Happiness for People In Tech

People in tech are prone to working too much and all the time, for their day jobs and volunteer projects. We work nights, weekends. We neglect family, friends and hobbies. If you want to learn about SELF care and how to practice it continuously, this talk is for you!
Practice 2017-03-22 11:19:06 +0000
Anna Ossowski

* SVG: So Very Good

Icon fonts! CSS-only illustrations! High-resolution GIF animations! Today's web designers still regularly and enthusiastically employ these techniques... yet they're all a better fit for SVG, a powerful vector image format that's already old enough to drive a car.
Theory 2017-03-29 18:10:50 +0000
Tyler Sticka

* Teaching Undergraduates how to contribute to Open Source

Surprisingly, most college students, even those enrolled in a CS program, don't really know what Open Source means. What does Open Source mean? What is the difference between each of the most popular Open Source licenses? What development tools and processes do you need to be familiar with to begin to contribute to an Open Source project? How do you evaluate an Open Source project to determine if it is the right one for you? How do you gain enough confidence to submit your first pull request to a live open source project?
Culture 2017-03-31 20:38:22 +0000
Chadd Williams

* The Death of Data: Retention, Rot, and Risk

I want to problematize keeping deprecated codebases around, and emphasize that mindless retention of data and code just increases our threat surfaces for attack and data corruption. Attackers in the future may be motivated by both ideology and money, and we are responsible for that.
Activism 2017-04-01 01:53:25 +0000
Heidi Waterhouse

* The Emerging Interoperable Social Web — Standardizing the Social Web II

In this sequel to last year's talk, Aaron Parecki will cover the current state of interoperable implementations of the well-established W3C standards you heard about last year. Many of these standards have grown this year both in number of implementations and their live usage on the web. In addition, Aaron will cover this year's emerging standards that have a few implementations and could use additional experimentation and feedback.
Theory 2017-03-31 22:44:58 +0000
Aaron Parecki

* The Future of the Web is Low-Tech

Learn about the unexpected use cases of your online content and the technologies available to help expand the breadth of its distribution.
Practice 2017-03-31 16:51:36 +0000
Eric Mann

* The Kids Are Going to be 200 OK

Infosec is like sex ed. If you wait until kids need it, you have waited too long. Schools don't, peers can't, we have to.
Culture 2017-04-01 02:03:24 +0000
Heidi Waterhouse

* The Monster on the Project

Abusive behaviour can have profound effects on personal relationships but it can also make open source contributing and office life miserable. For those stuck in a team with co workers who exhibit toxic behavior, going to work every day can feel like going to a battlefield. Knowing how to identify and how to respond to unreasonable behavior is vital. In this talk we will look at the ways we can improve our office and FOSS communities by recognizing, managing and gracefully removing this toxic behavior.
Culture 2017-04-02 22:13:33 +0000
Tiberius Hefflin

* The Set of Programmers: How Math Restricts Us

People new to programming often have to work through barriers of language and learning in order to become proficient and being contributing. Does one of those barriers need to be one's math skills? Most schools and textbooks seem to think so. Let's discuss how we're introducing new developers to programming and whether we can make it more inclusive by removing the mathematics and replacing it with logic.
Culture 2017-03-01 05:34:52 +0000
Carol Smith

* The Space Between Teams

It starts small--a manageable codebase, a tight-knit team, everyone headed the same direction. But with success comes growth, and soon it’s hard to keep track of all those teams. Problems emerge in the gaps between what one team provides and another expects. Let’s look at how New Relic has faced these growing pains.
Practice 2017-03-31 17:28:37 +0000
Jason Clark

* Threading Yarn, Writing Code: What Traditional Arts and Crafts Can Teach Us About Programming

You’ve probably heard people say that programming is an art and a craft. Does it have anything to do with the traditional arts and crafts like cross stitching, knitting, or sewing? In this talk we’ll explore the intersection of traditional and modern crafts and what they can learn from each other.
Theory 2017-03-22 11:13:56 +0000
Anna Ossowski

* Transform Your Organization Like a Jedi, You Should

Take home some practical Jedi mind-tricks and use them with ease to make your organization more awesome.
Culture 2017-03-28 23:28:03 +0000
Eric Maxwell

* Unionizing Tech: Everybody needs a union

The Open Source Movement has a few defining traits, such as the the do-it-yourself, stick-it-to-the-man scrappiness; the caring about the people around us and their experience with the software or workplace; and, the way it is forever adaptable to the needs of the situation. Open source and unions have a lot in common - lets get started unionizing open source shops!
Culture 2017-03-07 20:49:59 +0000
Sam Scott

* Voting-Method-Reform Activism

Activists around the world are experimenting with using voting to coordinate their decisions, and it's obvious that secure, open-source software must handle this form of communication. Yet typically such software is developed without involving "voting architects" who understand the math behind fair and unfair voting methods. Let's bridge this gap. Together we can build surveys and decentralized collaboration systems that bring democracy to very high levels of fairness, especially compared to the intentionally unfair use of single-mark ballots in governmental elections.
Activism 2017-03-13 06:20:31 +0000
Richard Fobes

* Want to own Twitter? The burgeoning Platform Cooperativism movement and what it means for you.

They have started up democratic copies of major platforms. They are building ways to better collaborate using the internet. They’re even talking about citizens buying out and protecting important internet communities like Twitter. Who are these people? They are Platform Cooperativists.
Activism 2017-04-01 06:18:47 +0000
Taylor McLeod

* We are the first line of defense

We, as developers, are the first line of defense for our friends, neighbors, and customers. Let’s own this responsibility and support one another in achieving a safer, more secure tech community.
Activism 2017-03-31 17:09:30 +0000
Eric Mann

* What is a Bug?: Imagination and Failure in Complex Systems

When working in complex systems, bugs become more than just one-line errors: they become stories and histories, manifestations of time and space. How do you deal with failure - not as an unanticipated event - but as a natural and expected outcome?
Practice 2017-03-26 02:46:10 +0000
Bonnie Eisenman

* Where Am I? Build Your Own Open-Source Geocoder!

At Hack Oregon, we often need to geocode or reverse-geocode - translate an address to latitude and longitude or vice versa. There are public APIs for this, but most of them have rate limits or intellectual property constraints that impact their usefulness. So we built our own, using the Census Bureau TIGER/Line® shapefiles, PostGIS Tiger geocoder, and Docker. I'll go through the process, from downloading the data and filtering to deploying the final image.
Practice 2017-04-01 00:18:41 +0000
M Edward Borasky

* Why Is a Raven Like a Pull Request: What Writing Workshops Can Bring to Code Reviews

Many talks aimed at beginners to open source contribution assume that concepts like peer review and justification of intent are brand new. If you have ever experienced the thrills–and/or horrors–of a writing workshop, many ideas central to a successful pull request aren't that new at all. Let's talk about what experienced workshoppers and the field of writing critique can bring to your OS project.
Culture 2017-04-01 02:57:53 +0000
Christine Bryant-Ryback

* Why the Internet Loves Cats

When you love your work, when you are passionate, it is easy to push yourself too hard and burn out. Burnout is a real problem in the tech industry. We hear a lot about self care, but what is it? How do you do it? And what does it have to do with cats on the internet? In this interactive session, we will explore the subject together to find an answer to these burning questions.
Culture 2017-04-02 22:28:03 +0000
Tiberius Hefflin

* Why you should try volunteer teaching

A talk about my experience teaching classes as a volunteer and how it's an important, rewarding way to help your community
Activism 2017-03-31 18:34:42 +0000
Clarissa Littler

* Writing Inclusively about Technology Topics

Based on The Responsible Communication Style Guide, this workshop is an introduction to the concepts in the style guide. It also covers how a style guide can be an effective part of the workflow when creating and promoting technology projects (including open source).
Culture 2017-04-04 20:57:11 +0000
Thursday Bram

* Your Emotional API: How Being A Better Human Makes You A Better Developer

Feelings are messy and uncomfortable, so why can't you just ignore them? Because research shows that emotional regulation skills have a significant impact on your job performance. In this talk you’ll learn how emotions are affecting your work by modeling them as an API and looking at their code.
Culture 2017-04-03 02:42:03 +0000
John Sawers

Open Source Bridge 2016

Favorite sessions for this user

* A programmers guide to Music.

Imagine a place where Ruby meets Music, its called MAGIC LAND. Music is not a lot different from programming. In this talk we will see how. I will talk about this amazing piece of open-source software called SonicPi. SonicPi is a new kind of musical instrument. Think about it, you write code to make music. And it gets even better, code is written in a ruby DSL. Also I will talk about notes, samples, synth and other musical things SonicPi lets us do it. Don't worry if do not get these terms. When I started, I did not either. But at the end of the talk, you will know how to make music.
Culture
Rishi Jain

* Accidental Developer Evangelism

Learn how to organize community events and share your ideas with the open-source community AFK!
Culture
Katherine Fellows

* Cat Herding 101: Best Practices for Fostering an Engaged and Effective Online Community

Depending on what sector we come from, the words “community organizing/management” might invoke images of canvassing with flyers and clipboards or moderating online forums and high-fiving code contributors. Regardless, when we coordinate volunteers, email program participants, and chat with community members via social media, we are ultimately organizing and developing community. Whether your supporters are contributing content, volunteering, participating in forum discussions, or engaging on social media, you can play an important community management role.
Culture
Bethany Lister

* Creating a Third Wave of Free/Open Source Software

The free/open source software movement is over thirty years old, and has gone through a number of changes in that time, spawning projects large and small (including OpenConferenceWare, which runs this site!). If Free Software is the first generation, and Open Source is the second, current efforts toward creating an inclusive and sustainable world make up a third generation that we can start to form into a broader plan.
Culture
Audrey Eschright

* Demystifying Regular Expressions

Long ago, in the early ages of computerdom, a language was formed from the primordial fires of Tartarus. The language would bind the spells of textual strings and forever control them: The Regular Expression. How about an interactive workshop for acolytes who wish to command this strong magic?
Practice
Howard Abrams

* Exit Condition: when to ragequit, raise hell, or duck and cover

If you're caught in a job or a project where you simply can't convince your colleagues or organization to treat you with respect, it often feels like you're in a maze with no clear way out. (Un)fortunately, you're not alone. There's no universal solution to navigating a toxic or abusive workplace, but there's power in finding a theoretical context, sharing our stories, and learning from each other. Come learn about the options of voice, loyalty, and exit, and hear the stories of others who have had to make hard choices.
Culture
Frances Hocutt

* Exploring Mental Illness With Open Source

Julia Nguyen leads if me, an app to share mental health experiences with loved ones. In doing so, she has explored her insecurities with mental illness, learned how to engage diverse contributors, and developed better software practices with Ruby on Rails and JavaScript. She’ll share the lessons she has learned from transforming a passion project into an open source project. Inclusion takes on many forms in an open source project, including supporting contributors from all types of backgrounds, being empathetic to their project goals, and trusting them to take lead. As a mental health project, if me must also accommodate its contributors who face their own mental health challenges. All open source projects should do the same. Managing people is just as important as managing technical contributions in software.
Culture
Julia Nguyen

* Free Culture in an Expensive World

Money is a common worry, inside the open source community and out, but we often feel uncomfortable discussing it. We’ll talk about why that is and how our social norms around money impact who participates in open source and how they do so. The heart of this talk will be a series of case studies based on interviews with community members covering various economic models for open source, including worker co-ops, grant-funded and academic projects, for-profit business models, crowdfunding campaigns, and all-volunteer projects. We’ll explore the sustainability of each model as well as how they deal with the social pressures outlined in the first part of the talk.
Business
Shauna Gordon-McKeon

* Free Culture, Free Software

I gave a similar talk at LibrePlanet 2015 and would like to reprise it with updated information on the current state of FOSS for Cultural Heritage. I'd like to discuss how to get involved with FOSS projects that are related to the Cultural Heritage space and what kinds of projects currently exist. I'll end the session by talking about what kinds of projects could and should exist as well as community building and awareness in FOSS for Cultural Heritage Organizations.
Culture
Jennie Rose Halperin

* Geek Choir

In this session, we explore ways to improve team cohesion, cooperation, and presence for each other through connecting via song.
Culture
Michael Alan Brewer

* Great Asana!

Bring your stiff shoulders, sore wrists, tight hips, aching back, and busy mind and explore how Yoga can help bring you relief, rest, and focus. Leave with ideas on how to incorporate 5 minutes of practice into your busy day to care for your body and mind. This class is accessible to all levels of ability.
Culture
Sherri Koehler

* Hard Problems in Terms of Service Enforcement

When you run an online service, you always hope you won't have to deal with abuse. But it's inevitable, and many situations aren't clear-cut as you might wish. Some examples of abuse are obvious, but this talk explores the grey areas and messy questions: what content should you consider a violation of your Terms of Service, and how do you handle it when it's reported to you?
Culture
Denise Paolucci

* Hogwarts is a Terrible Learning Environment: Discuss

Like many young Muggles of the early 00's, I dreamed of receiving my Hogwarts letter. But re-reading the series with an eye toward learning lessons about creating a positive learning environment, it's clear that Hogwarts School of Witchcraft and Wizardry contains some unfortunate lessons in what NOT to do. When it comes to crafting an environment that encourages asking questions, fosters cooperation, and ensuring the success of its developers -- I mean, wizards -- we can learn a lot from the mistakes of the Hogwarts faculty. In this magical talk, you'll learn how to be a better mentor and help your workplace become a place where your junior developers can flourish.
Culture
Lacey Williams Henschel

* Librarians and Open Source: We Need Code, Too!

Getting people started is easy. Sustaining people through is not. Let's talk about the ways the Open Source community can help people beyond the beginning steps, in the context of public library programming and staff development.
Culture
Alex Byrne

* Open Source is People

For those who want to do more than just code, this talk will show you 8 ways I have contributed without opening up Vim once.
Culture
Justin Dorfman

* Postcards from the Edge Case: When One Size Doesn't Fit All

For every average person that finds your product what they want, there is a person outside that average that wants to use your product. They might even be able to use your product, if there was a way to make it work for them. Outliers are useful for your design, if you harness them properly.
Culture
Alex Byrne

* Rethinking Social Media, Privacy, and Information Flow from the Ground Up

Inspired by security and privacy research in operating systems, we'll be discussing possible ways to redesign privacy models so that all users can have fine-grained control over both visibility of their content and how others can interact with it.
Theory
Clarissa Littler

* Standardizing the Social Web - W3C #socialweb specs

The W3C Social Web Working Group has been developing standards to make it easier to build social applications in the open web. In this talk, you'll get an overview of the various specifications in development, (Activity Streams 2, Webmention, Micropub, and ActivityPub), to help you learn how each applies to the social web.
Theory
Aaron Parecki

* Supporting diversity with a new approach to software

It’s time for a new approach to software, one that embraces differences (not just tolerates them), and sees diversity as a strength. The industry is primed for change, and there are huge opportunities to do better by valuing emotion, intuition, compassion, purpose, empowerment, sustainability, and social justice. This highly-interactive session includes discussions of current “best practices” and emerging ideas from projects that have focused heavily on diversity, issues and problems in today’s environment, imagining how things could be different, and figuring out concrete steps to make it happen.
Theory
Jon Pincus, Tammarrian Rogers

* The Folk Knowledge of Bugzilla

It's good to know if a bug is a regression, and if I want to mark a bug as a regression, there's a keyword for that. (searches on regression keyword.) But there's also a whiteboard tag for that (searches on whiteboard tags containing 'regression'.) Oh dear, and let me unique that out and there's how many ways to say "this is a regression." If you're a release manager, how do you find out what bugs may be regressions and that you want to follow up on with your engineering leads?
Practice
Emma Humphries

* The Rise of Emoji

Emoji is taking over the Web! We will look at how the phenomenon of Emoji has taken the Web by storm, explore how people are using Emoji on their favorite platforms and implications. We will also examine how these online platforms are benefiting from Emoji.
Culture
Alolita Sharma

* Turning Sensors into Signals: Humanizing IoT with Old Smartphones and the Web

People are already tired of the over-promise of IoT - the slew of marginally useful products, the overly confusing and crowded developer space, and endless examples of how to turn an LED on and off. Take a break, step back from the crowd, and come learn how to solve real human problems with that old phone that's collecting dust on your shelf.
Hacks
Rabimba Karanjai

* Unraveling the Masculinization of Technology

Have you ever wondered where the perception that technology is a masculine pursuit comes from? Or why we have to explain that, "no really, women are interested in computers too"?
Culture
Audrey Eschright

* What can the open source software of today learn from the history of software documentation?

In the early years of easily distributable software, technical writers and the documentation that they produced were a crucial part of the software development process. Why? What kinds of contributions did they make, and what might their close cooperation with the programmers of their day teach us about how to manage open source projects better today?
Culture
Jennifer Rondeau

Favorite proposals for this user

* Becoming a Web Developer

The web is ubiquitous, having beaten out a litany of competing technologies, and many “native applications” rely on web-based back-ends. From desktop to mobile, to watches, virtual reality headsets, and cars -- the web is a core set of technologies with vast reach. This makes familiarity with web technology a valuable asset for many, many people. Whether you’re a software engineer, marketer, project manager, junior web developer, or student -- you will leave this session with the forest, the trees, and a compass for navigating all of it.
Practice 2016-04-11 01:03:54 +0000
Josh Simmons

* Blurring the line between OSS communities: Devs, Vendors, Gov't and Users

Established OSS projects have complex communities that must (at least) try to work together. Presentation of my experience with OpenEMR's and other projects successes and failures and interact with the audience to share their own experiences.
Culture 2016-04-09 23:53:49 +0000
Tony McCormick

* Building community with Twitter chats

The team building community around a book called The Open Organization wanted to see how social media could enhance our efforts. We investigated and successfully used Twitter chats as a way to continue conversation and dialog around what it means to be an open leader. Now it's time to share what we've learned so you can do the same thing for your community.
Practice 2016-03-18 22:14:24 +0000
Jason Hibbets

* Can Online Interaction Match some of the Magic of Face-to-Face Collaboration?

Join this interactive session connecting what we know about face-to-face collaboration and how and why it works with what online dialog, games, berry-picking, wayfinding and other large scale activities can accomplish.
Theory 2016-04-17 17:20:06 +0000
Carie Fox

* Community > Documentation > Code: a Guide to Successful Open Source

Many people create projects with amazing technical prowess, only to see it fail to gain traction. We wonder "I thought this was clearly the best solution, why aren't people using it? Did I miss some bugs? Is it too slow? What went wrong?" The answer usually isn't technical, it's documentation or community related. This talk will teach you all the non-technical things your project needs to gain traction.
Culture 2016-04-16 02:12:52 +0000
Bryan Hughes

* Copyleft For the Next Decade: A Comprehensive Plan

Copyleft, and the GPL in particular, are under threat. The treacherous political climate of for-profit open source cooption has changed the nature of our community. Can copyleft continue to be an effective tool to defend software freedom, and if so, how?
Culture 2016-04-06 18:04:35 +0000
Bradley Kuhn

* Creating a measurable market for desktop applications

The desktop application market has long languished. Even today there is no way to understand the strength of the GNU/Linux desktop application market. This talk will focus on creating a measurable desktop market by focusing on changing the application distribution model using GNOME xdg-app.
Culture 2016-04-11 19:10:50 +0000
Sriram Ramkrishna

* CSS Performance & What is the Browser doing?

Learn how the browser renders webpages, how to write better css, and how to monitor front end performance in Chrome.
Theory 2016-04-16 02:03:43 +0000
Sarah Etter

* Debugging Diversity

Despite the media attention given to the diversity in tech problem, many technology practitioners don't see how a lack of diversity affects their daily life. So, it is not surprising that they neither understand the magnitude of the problem nor how they can fix it. However, the principles and language of debugging, something technology practitioners understand well, can be used to help them understand diversity and their role in solving the problem. So, technologists already have a set of terms that they can use to tackle diversity. They just need to know how to apply those terms in order to effect positive change. These terms are expected behavior, tracing, refactoring, and sample code.
Culture 2016-03-16 19:25:11 +0000
Anjuan Simmons

* Designing and Writing Secure Software

Attackers only need to be right once, but developers have to be right all the time. Secure software development practices are essential.
Practice 2016-04-13 23:34:56 +0000
Aaron Jensen

* Domain-Driven Data

There are many types of open source databases and data analysis tools from which to choose today. Should you use a relational database? How about a key-value store? Maybe a document database? Or is a graph database the right fit for your project? What about polyglot persistence? Help!
Practice 2016-04-13 22:03:19 +0000
Bradley Holt

* Don't Get Scared, Get Started

Contributing to open source is rewarding in terms of the satisfactions you get while you help the open source community to grow as well as the new things that you get to learn. If you go on discussing about contributing to open source most of them find it intimidating. Most of them are scared of contributing to open source projects. Most of them think that it is too tough to get in, too tough to get started and they won’t be able to do it. There are a lot of myths about the difficulty level of getting started with contributing to open source. With this talk I would like to break the myths and tell the truths around them.
Culture 2016-04-20 06:24:13 +0000
Tapasweni Pathak

* Explicit is Better Than Implicit: Setting Expectations

Miscommunication, wasted time, hurt feelings: real dangers when communicating with strangers online. As FOSS maintainers and contributors, let's try documenting our communication guidelines the same way we document our code style guidelines.
Culture 2016-04-05 01:48:19 +0000
Trey Hunner

* Exploring Functional Programming Through Games

How do you decide whether a new programming paradigm is worth learning or not? I ask myself a simple question: can I use it to make games in a simple way? Learning by playing is super fun. Allow me to take you on a thrilling journey to explore functional programming through JavaScript games. Let us dive deep into functional features that will help us approach complex problems from new directions and write bulletproof code.
Practice 2016-04-09 00:04:06 +0000
Khalid A

* Exploring Privilege in Open Source Communities

In many open source communities, privilege is rarely discussed. While it is not an easy topic to talk about, it is an important subject to explore if we want to make sure open source is truly open to everyone. After exploring sources of privilege and learning strategies to deal with it, we can all be better equipped to take action to improve our open source communities for the long run.
Culture 2016-04-12 16:46:20 +0000
Taylor Barnett

* Fail Early, Fail Often, Fail Well

If failure is inevitable, why aren't we taught how to cope with it? In this talk I outline 10 types of failure to avoid and detail a framework for navigating recovery from failures large and small.
Business 2016-04-11 00:59:34 +0000
Josh Simmons

* From Mobile First to Offline First

It's all too easy assume that your web or mobile app will run on a fast and reliable network with great coverage. The reality for your app's users, though, is often a slow and unreliable network with spotty coverage. What happens when the network doesn't work, or when the device is in airplane mode? You get unhappy, frustrated users. Building on the principles of mobile first, offline first is an approach to application design in which a web, mobile, desktop, or Internet of Things (IoT) application is built for offline usage first and is then progressively enhanced to take advantage of network connectivity when available.
Practice 2016-04-14 19:20:48 +0000
Bradley Holt

* From Open-Source Code to Open-Source Project

Having a successful open-source project is more than putting your code on Github.
Culture 2016-04-13 21:43:32 +0000
Aaron Jensen

* Hackers & Hearthstone & Humanity

Sometimes the tech community can feel like it is without soul so Hackers & Hearthstone was created to focus on the cool things people are doing within the technology world.
Culture 2016-03-30 15:24:46 +0000
Lindsey Bieda

* How I Learned To Stop Worrying and Love the Engineers: cross cultural clashes between Support and Engineering (and some ways to fix them)

It's possible to do Support work while knowing absolutely nothing about the underlying architecture. Support doesn't necessarily know why the product works, or even what language it's written in. It can be super tempting for an engineer to think that well, if these support people really had the competence and capacity to understand how the thing worked under the hood, then they'd be engineers and not mere support people, but that's a bad trap to fall into. Sometimes Support people are engineers in their own right, but a Support person with no computer science training can be an expert on the user interaction surfaces of the product and reproduce a result that has been baffling the engineers, even with no knowledge of the mechanism by which the bug is happening. It's helpful to give Support enough information about the architecture to have a better starting point for asking the user for details and trying approaches to replicate the problem. It can be tempting for Support to think that any given member of Engineering understands the entire breadth, depth, complexity, and interconnectedness of the entire product simultaneously at any given time, but this is a trap! A good amount of time Engineering has no clue in the slightest about what is going on in another branch of the product, and in a sufficiently complex codebase, there can be millions of lines of code that a single particular engineer has never touched or even heard of. Or it's been long enough since they worked on that part of it that they would have to take several hours of very hard study in order to figure out what's going on. In particular, sometimes in a bug report, Engineering can say "Okay, I see what *part* of the code the user is causing to fire, but I haven't the FOGGIEST idea how the customer actually got that to happen." It's very important for Support to list out every single step (even the ones that seem obvious) that leads to the error occurring.
Culture 2016-04-14 06:31:31 +0000
Azure Lunatic

* How I unexpectedly built a monster of an open source project

In 2009, Oh My Zsh was released. It's since become a popular open source tool used by developers around the world. Let's walk through how a really small idea turned into a big project.
Culture 2016-04-11 22:17:44 +0000
Robby Russell

* How not to fail with Open Source

Creating a open source project is not easy. Which license you have to choose and many other questions come up, if you are creating a open source project or library.
Business 2016-04-03 03:50:25 +0000
Patrik Karisch

* How To Be A Great Developer

Being a great developer is much more than technical know-how. Empathy, communication, and reason are at least as important, but are undervalued in our industry. We'll examine the impact these skills can have and how to apply them to our work.
Culture 2016-03-26 03:14:34 +0000
Ed Finkler

* How to promote open source for education by translating

It is necessary a waste that we seldom make the most of free resources online. We spend a lot of budget buying the software which is replaceable and deal with problems in an ineffective way. That is why we start this project to help others in an efficient way.
Culture 2016-04-10 16:53:10 +0000
孟軒 蔡

* I don't know what I am doing

But, open source got me here. During this talk, I will invoke my inner Anthony Robbins to motivate others to contribute to open source in ways that they may not have considered before -- by illustrating how open source has open doors in my career and how anyone can have the same doors opened. I am not special. I did things.
Business 2016-04-21 06:36:49 +0000
Jackie Kazil

* Interactive Archival of Art and Science

Growing concerns of media preservation mean a surge of new digital libraries. However, digital preservation is more than just photos and video; it's also interactive software: art creating new art. We will explore the problem of preserving software; past, present, and future; and why it is hard.
Culture 2016-04-01 00:22:18 +0000
wil kie

* Introducing new generations to Open Source

How to make young developers contribute to open source? How to find talent for your company? How to help underrepresented groups to start a professional path on programming? Can we tackle all of these at the same time? Yes! and here's how
Culture 2016-04-13 02:22:03 +0000
Fernando Perales

* Learning HTTP

HTTP is the fabric of the web and the growing API economy. Whether you're building a backend or a frontend application, creating an API, or consuming an API, it’s helpful to understand the basics of HTTP. Topics covered will include HTTP methods, request headers, request URIs, response status codes, response headers, resource representations, authentication, content negotiation, and caching.
Theory 2016-04-14 19:32:46 +0000
Bradley Holt

* Lossless Emoji - Doing Emoji Right

Learn how difficult it can be to do emoji right and what you can do to preserve the message and emotions of your users. If you take user input, you owe it to the internet to attend this talk.
Practice 2016-04-13 07:21:09 +0000
Ryan Kennedy

* Machine Ethics and Emerging Technologies

An autonomous car is driving down a single-lane road carved out of a cliff. Unexpectedly, a child runs in front the car chasing a ball, and trips. The car cannot stop in time to avoid a fatal collision, but it can sacrifice itself and its passenger by driving off the cliff. Should it? And if so, would you buy such a car?
Theory 2016-04-14 07:32:44 +0000
Paul Fenwick

* Made in the Machine: New Cultural Practices, Critical Analyses, and Techniques in Digital Fabrication, Making, and Manufacturing

I first knowingly witnessed the "Maker Movement" in 2010, heeded its siren call by joining the MIT Media Lab in 2011, and became disillusioned later that year. But I've been stubbornly making--and critiquing the notions of Making--ever since.
Culture 2016-04-11 00:20:51 +0000
Arlene Ducao

* Open source all the cities

Open source has transformed software development, now it's starting to change other parts of the world we live in. Not only is open source transforming our businesses and education systems, it's a key component to changing citizen participation in government. Creating a better citizen experience starts with the open source way. You'll learn about the five principles of an open source city and hear stories that take you from civic hacking to a government-focused unconference called CityCamp.
Practice 2016-03-18 22:09:03 +0000
Jason Hibbets

* Open Source Fan Service

What can you do when someone submits a bad patch to your project? To begin, we have to understand why people hunger to contribute code: they're fans. You hurt fans' feelings when you reject their patches, but you hurt your project if you accept them. You can get out of this bind! Give your fans other ways to be recognized. Showcase their plugins in your project’s wiki, or rewrite their patches while giving them credit, or feature their related projects on your site.
Culture 2016-03-26 21:59:46 +0000
A. Jesse Jiryu Davis

* Open Source Software for Product Managers (Freeloaders are necessary)

There are simple rules to understand when building products from open source software. Product teams (from engineering to marketing) need to understand these rules to participate best in open source project communities and deliver products and services to their customers at the same time. These rules hold regardless of whether the vendor created and owns the project or participates.
Business 2016-04-21 02:39:14 +0000
Stephen Walli

* Open Source Your Ideas: Why You Should Keep A Blog

Blogging is a great way for developers to share with the community the kind of things they've been learning and working on. By keeping a regularly updated blog, we force ourselves to continually evaluate the things we're learning, while sharing these ideas with the community at large.
Culture 2016-03-27 23:52:56 +0000
Andrew Pierce

* Open Source: Power and the Passion

Open Source is one of the foundation pillars of our industry. You probably use the power of open source software every day: in the code you write, the tools you build with, the servers you deploy to. But perhaps it’s not quite the stable foundation we were hoping for? This talk will cover the various strengths and weaknesses of both open source and our reliance upon it, so we can trade in our assumptions for a greater awareness of the issues. Then together, we can find a path towards a more sustainable open source ecosystem.
Culture 2016-04-16 15:19:51 +0000
Pat Allan

* Securing Web by hacking!

With the right skills, tools and software, you can protect yourself and remain secure. This session will take attendees from no knowledge of open source web security tools to a deep understanding of how to use them and their growing set of capabilities.
Hacks 2016-04-16 15:46:43 +0000
Sumanth Damarla

* Software Patents After Alice: A Long and Sad Tail

The Supreme Court's ruling in the landmark Alice vs. CLS Bank case has finally given the lower courts some tools they could use to overturn obvious and vague patents, particularly frivolous patents on software. But we haven't won, because bogus patent suits are still being filed. This talk is for anyone who is wondering what the recent decisions mean for small and mid-size entities, how international treaties can impact local policy and what can be done to improve the situation.
Business 2016-04-13 17:05:45 +0000
Deb Nicholson

* Stronger Than Fear: Mental Health in the Developer Community

Mental disorders are the largest contributor to disease burden in North America, but the developer community and those who employ us are afraid to face the problem head-on. In this talk, we'll examine the state of mental health awareness in the developer workplace, why most developers feel it isn't safe to talk about mental health, and what we can do to change the culture and save lives. Attendees will leave with 5 things they can do to make their workplace safer for those dealing with mental health disorders.
Culture 2016-03-26 03:07:30 +0000
Ed Finkler

* Technical writing as public service: working on open source in government

What if U.S. federal agencies decided to reuse and contribute to open source software projects built by other agencies, since agencies often have similar technology problems to solve? And what if they hired technical writers with open source community experience to write documentation for these projects? That would be pretty cool. Also, that’s my work. I'm part of 18F, a digital services consulting team within and for the federal government, and all of our work is open source.
Practice 2016-04-06 00:21:15 +0000
Britta Gustafson

* The High Barrier to Entry in Tech for the Underpriviliged

When you are trying to transition into tech, it helps to be part of an open source community that welcomes people from all types of backgrounds and experience-levels. If you are a beginner programmer and underprivileged, the search for the right tech community can be a daunting experience. You may be systematically excluded from participating in some communities by gatekeepers. As a programmer who comes from a marginalised community, allow me to share with you the story of how I found a programming community that welcomed and helped me to overcome the high barrier to entry in tech. This talk aims to encourage everyone to do their bit to create inviting communities for the underprivileged.
Culture 2016-04-08 23:02:52 +0000
Khalid A

* The Recipe to Getting Attendees to Your Open Source Events

With the growth of open source comes the need for more conferences, meetups and hackathons – you name it! These events give community members the opportunity to interact face-to-face to solve problems, come up with new ideas, or even just to chat and get to know each other better. But, the question is – how do we get developers, users and contributors from open source communities to these events?
Culture 2016-04-14 22:33:04 +0000
Karen Vuong

* Transpreneur: Tales of a FTM Transgender Entrepreneur

The primary reason I was able to make career pivots at Intel was due to my connections to the Women at Intel network. Through this network I was referred to career counselors, business contacts, and the technical experts I needed to move my career ahead. As an FTM, my inbox is still filled with opportunities from women in tech groups, but now when I see these emails I wonder if I will be welcomed or not. A recent email I received said specifically "if you are female please attend." As a person who now identifies as male, I find that my connection to the community that supported me for the entirety of my career is now becoming tenuous.
Culture 2016-04-14 15:35:59 +0000
Sev Leonard

* What Shipping Containers Can Teach Us About Digital Content Standards

Global trade wouldn’t be as efficient without the invention - and standardization - of shipping containers. Standardized containers have globalized our economy across the shipping industry in a way that wouldn’t have been possible otherwise. What can this earlier standardization effort teach us about the tools and systems we’re building today? What are the struggles of our digital age? How are the struggles of shipping goods in 1950s similar to our content struggles now - and how can we move forward?
Theory 2016-04-11 18:07:00 +0000
Kendra Skeene, Nikhil Deshpande

Open Source Bridge 2015

Favorite sessions for this user

* "A huge green fierce snake bars the way!"; or, Building a Text Adventure Game in Python

Have you ever wanted to vanquish a dragon with your bare hands? First step is making a world where you can. In this talk, I'll give you the blueprints for my Python text adventure engine, as well as some recipes for making things in a text-only world.
Cooking
Katie Silverio

* Bringing non-technical people to the Free/Libre/Open world and why it matters

Software freedom advocates sometimes believe a myth of "trickle-down technology" — that open collaboration and freedom for programmers will somehow lead to more free and open technology for the rest of society. To build technology that truly empowers most people, we need more non-programmers actively involved in development. I'll share my story of how I started as a music teacher and became the co-founder of an ambitious Free/Libre/Open project. We'll discus lessons about outreach to others like me.
Culture
Aaron Wolf

* Building and maintaining a healthy community

Open Source organizations and projects are driven by the strength of its community. We have often seen but how big communities fall because of wrong ways of handling it or mismanagements. My talk will be around the lines of how a community leader or manager can take a few extra responsibilities to keep a community healthy.
Culture
Priyanka Nag

* Building Diverse Social Networks

While only a handful of social networks like Dreamwidth and Quirell explicitly prioritize diversity, there are plenty of lessons to learn about what to do — and what not to do — from Facebook, Twitter, and others. Best practices include counter-oppressive politics, embedded in the community guidelines and norms; and the right tools, technologies, and policies. This session will look at what does and doesn't work in a variety of online environments.
Culture
Jon Pincus, Lynn Cyrin

* Cassandra at the Keyboard: Whistleblowing at all scales

What do you do if you see something that needs change in your organization. How do you "say something" for your "see something"? What are the benefits and drawbacks of even minor whistleblowing?
Culture
Heidi Waterhouse

* Catalyzing Diversity: Practical Advice for Navigating Minority STEM Communities to Open Up Open Source

How can Open Source Software projects attract minorities? Come to learn practical strategies to implement your diversity goals into actionable outreach efforts. We will describe ways to tap into minority STEM communities that exist both online and in meatspace. The former include Tweet chats and hashtags used by people of color who are enthusiasts of science (like #BLACKandSTEM) and tech (like #LATISM). The live events include annual conferences of minority students and professionals such as the Richard Tapia Celebration of Diversity in Computing.
Culture
Alberto Roca, Shauna Gordon-McKeon

* Community Moderation: you can't always halt a flamewar with one raised eyebrow (but it rarely hurts to try)

Even in an email list, moderation isn't limited to setting the entire email list to require approval before messages are posted. You can create rules which reflect the culture you'd like to see, and call attention to ways that the community differs from that culture. You can point out when a particular post doesn't fit with that culture -- publicly or privately, whichever you think will do the most good. You can point out when a particular post exemplifies something great about the culture. You can point out particular rules that everyone needs to keep abiding by, without calling out a specific post. If a specific person, or a specific handful of people, have trouble with the rules, you could put them in particular on moderated posting for some time. If someone keeps breaking the rules, that person is a good candidate for being removed entirely. There are limits to what the rest of the community and the moderators should have to deal with, even though your project may choose to keep that as a last resort. Sometimes the problem can be solved by redirection. If the main email list is getting cluttered with off-topic posts, consider a just-for-fun or off-topic side list to divert threads to once they wander off code and into sports, kittens, beer, or knitting. It's easier to say "You shouldn't do that here" than "You shouldn't do that, period"; it's even easier to say "You shouldn't do that here, but it would be great right over there." And most of us could use a sports, kittens, beer, or knitting break every now and then.
Culture
Azure Lunatic

* Consequences of an Insightful Algorithm

We have ethical responsibilities when coding. We're able to extract remarkably precise intuitions about an individual. But do we have a right to know what they didn't consent to share, even when they willingly shared the data that leads us there? How do we mitigate against unintended outcomes? In this talk, we'll learn how to build in systematic empathy, integrate practices for examining how our code might harm individuals, and net consequences that can be better for everyone.
Culture
Carina C. Zona

* Desigining for Renaming

Renaming yourself is never easy. In Santa Clara County in the State of California, to file a petition to change one's name costs over $400, and may take six months or more. Then one must change one's name (and possibly one's gender marker) on the dozens of sites and services one uses. On many sites, that's easy, I go to preferences and edit my name. But then the site addresses me as "Mr. Emma Humphries," oh really? Other systems will correctly greet me as "Emma" when I log in. But still call me by $DEAD_NAME when they send an email. This brings us to the first best practice: When I change my name in one place, change it in all the places.
Culture
Emma Humphries

* Fear Driven Development

Have you ever not made a much-needed change because you were afraid of breaking something? Caution is wise, but too much fear can leave even the most agile of software organizations with a crippling aversion to change. This talk will discuss what makes us scared, why it hurts us, and my experiences helping a team I managed get rid of some of our fears.
Culture
Ryan Kennedy

* From the Inside Out: How Self-Talk Affects Your Community

Identifying and discouraging negative self-talk is a simple thing, but it can have a huge impact on your community in a positive way. It increases self-confidence, improves morale, and generally results in happier, more productive community participants. This, in turn, will make you happy.
Culture
Kat Toomajian

* Funding for Open Source Projects: Is a Universal Basic Income the Solution?

Contributing to open-source projects without worrying about making a living? What sounds like a dream could become a reality with the institution of an economic concept called basic income. The idea is currently being debated in numerous countries. This talk will introduce the concept and outline the possible benefits of basic income for the open source community.
Business
Luc Perkins

* GeekChoir 2015

In this session, we'll continue the grand Open Source Bridge tradition of learning how to increase team cohesion, identity, and collaboration through music, joining our voices (in our uniquely geeky way) in harmony.
Culture
Michael Alan Brewer

* Hello, my name is __________.

Our personal identity is core to how we perceive ourselves and wish to be seen. All too often, however, applications, databases, and user interfaces are not designed to fully support the diversity of personal and social identities expressed throughout the world.
Cooking
Nova Patch

* How To Be A Great Developer

Being a great developer is much more than technical know-how. Empathy, communication, and reason are at least as important, but are undervalued in our industry. We'll examine the impact these skills can have and how to apply them to our work.
Business
Ed Finkler

* How you tell the story matters: telling better stories and making better technologies

What happens when we tell stories? How do we tell stories about the technology we build, why do some stories get told over others? How do we talk about our successes, and how do we not talk about our failures? Whose stories get heard: how do women, people of color, disabled people, and “non-technical” workers get left out of the stories we hear? In this talk, I'll explore the role of storytelling in technology, and share what I've found about telling better stories.
Business
amelia abreu

* kenny_g.rb: Making Ruby Write Smooth Jazz

For too long, computers have been shut out of the red-hot music-to-listen-to-while-relaxing-in-the-bathtub genre. Today, that all changes. Our smooth-jazz-as-a-service startup is primed to disrupt this stale industry. All we need is a little Ruby and we'll make automated musical magic.
Hacks
Tim Krajcar

* Making the web fun again

When Geocities shut down, it did much more than delete a bunch of obnoxious dancing baby GIFs and Limp Bizkit MIDI files. It deleted the ability for people to easily create web sites, and learn how to be in complete control of the content and presentation they provide to their audience. To the economically and socially disenfranchised, it was a disaster that prevented countless people from learning programming. So we brought it back, and open sourced the entire thing (including our financial data). Leave your nostalgia at the door - let us show you our efforts to pave a better future for tech startups, the tech community, and the future of the web itself.
Culture
Kyle Drake, Victoria Wang

* Male/Female/Othered: Implementing Gender-Inclusiveness in User Data Collection

You want to gather information about your users that you can use to improve their experience and yours. They want their identities to be acknowledged and treated with respect. This talk is about meeting both needs: How to ask about gender in ways that welcome the diversity of reality while still being able to analyze the data you get back. We'll discuss the nature of that challenge, how some major websites address it, and example solutions for different scenarios.
Culture
Finn Ellis, Jonathan Harker

* Morning Keynote — Put Up or Shut Up: An Open Letter to Tech Companies Seeking Diverse Teams

People from marginalized communities struggle to break into tech, clawing our way through a racist, sexist, classist, ableist system only to be fired, quit or just suffer in misery. I’ll explore what it really takes to create a workplace that is truly welcoming of everyone.
Culture
Kronda Adair

* Opening Up The Current Open Source Blueprint

Accessibility, diversity, and open source holding itself accountable to its own standards of what it means to be an open community.
Culture
Stephanie Morillo

* Software Archeology and The Code Of Doom

You approach the legacy codebase with trepidation. If the vine-draped entrance and collapsing roof weren't enough warning, traces of previous explorers before you lie scattered about, caught in bizarre traps and oubliettes. What next, snakes?!
Chemistry
Kerri Miller

* Stronger Than Fear: Mental Health in the Developer Community

Mental disorders are the largest contributor to disease burden in North America, but the developer community and those who employ us are afraid to face the problem head-on. In this talk, we'll examine the state of mental health awareness in the developer workplace, why most developers feel it isn't safe to talk about mental health, and what we can do to change the culture and save lives.
Culture
Ed Finkler

* The Open Source Writing Stack

Open source makes writing and publishing much easier both online and in print — provided you know what tools to use. This talk covers those tools (from LaTeX to WordPress) and how to choose between them.
Hacks
Thursday Bram

* The Public Library As An (Almost) Open Source Institution

Your public library can be one of your best allies for creating, distributing, and promoting Open Source ideas and projects. They want to help - they just need to know how.
Culture
Alex Byrne

* Through the Warp Zone: Hacking Super Mario Brothers

Discover new worlds in Super Mario Brothers even the creators never saw!
Hacks
Emily St., Shawna Scott

* Tricking Out the Terminal: An Introduction

A beginner-focused overview of the particulars and pitfalls of the command line and several common shells, with a focus on improving developer workflows, exposing common default tools, implementing useful open-source tools, and inserting emoji into prompts (pretty much the best part of customizing the terminal).
Chemistry
Lydia Katsamberis

* User Research For Non-Researchers

User research doesn't have to be time-consuming, elaborate, or performed by a UX professional. If you're willing to talk to a few strangers, you can do user research. In this presentation, I'll talk about how to do lightweight research on any product or topic, no matter what your background and training are. I'll focus on the most effective tools for quick research, and some of the common pitfalls for novice researchers.
Cooking
Jane Davis

* What stuttering taught me about marketing - not your typical soft skills talk

Your weakness just might be your greatest strength.
Culture
Sharon Steed

* When Your Codebase Is Nearly Old Enough To Vote

What do you do when your project is so old that technology has changed around you? (Or, how do you future-proof a project that you've just started so that when it gets that old, you'll be ready?) Come hear a case study of Dreamwidth Studios, a fifteen-year-old web app with a codebase consisting of a quarter million lines of legacy Perl and a mission to modernize ... if it doesn't break everything.
Chemistry
Denise Paolucci

* Write It Down: Process Documentation from the Ground Up

The collective knowledge base of an organization can be difficult to crack. Some things have "always been done that way" but no one knows why. This talk will help to expose those undocumented corners of your project, and give you tools for writing process documentation for new contributors using lessons from Not-For-Profit organizations.
Culture
Kat Toomajian

* Yoga!

Accessible yoga for people of all levels, special attention given to yoga postures and breathing that you can do at your desk.
Culture
Sherri Koehler

Favorite proposals for this user

* ...Because Community Development matters.

The focus of talk would be on two major things Called "Initiate" and "Impact". How to Initiate a Open source community? and How to create an Impact through a community? I would talk about the things that we should care to initiate Open source community. What are the problems you could face during setting up a community and how to solve that problems. What are the things you would have to do that would make an impact.
Culture 2015-03-07 12:30:30 +0000
Milap Bhojak

* 5 Things I Wish Someone Told Me Before I Started Programming

There's more to being a successful developer than simply being great at programming.
Culture 2015-02-03 05:55:25 +0000
Kerri Miller

* Alchemy and the Art of Software Development

The metaphors we choose impose constraints on our thinking. We’ve chosen a limited set of fields to define our mental constraints. But almost any domain of human knowledge contains a rich vocabulary of patterns, metaphors, and tenets that can inform our problem-solving capabilities...
Culture 2015-03-07 21:38:40 +0000
Coraline Ada Ehmke

* Alice and Bob Are Really Confused

Journalists, activists, artists, business owners and other fine folks in New York City are asked to install PGP. You won't believe what happens next.
Culture 2015-03-15 00:29:32 +0000
David Huerta

* Aquameta: A New Way to Internet/Web/Code

Aquameta is a p2p network for code, data, and multimedia. Imagine a world where you can create simple data-driven applications straight from your browser, push them directly to your friends, and collaboratively share data. Now you can, with aquameta.
Hacks 2015-03-07 07:57:28 +0000
Eric Hanson

* Automate Yo'self

One of the greatest productivity boosts you can have as a programmer is optimizing your working environment to more tightly integrate your tools and remove inefficiencies. Come learn a number of tips, tricks, and tools that can make your programming experience faster and better.
Cooking 2015-03-08 05:44:12 +0000
John Anderson

* Automated image resizing using ImageMagick

This talk describes how to use ImageMagick to quickly resize images while maintaining great visual quality and a small file size.
Cooking 2015-03-14 22:58:10 +0000
David Newton

* Be Awesome To Each Other

Roundtable discussion to share tips and ideas that can be implemented for empowering everyone to (re-)build an inclusive, supportive tech culture.
Culture 2015-03-13 01:09:57 +0000
Cat Poole

* Be careful what you wish for: a successful developer community discouraged away from open source

Let's say you want your freedom-valuing software community to be wildly successful - with lots of user demand, a viable way that people can make money from their work if they want to, a heavily international audience, and lots of young people interested. What happens if you get what you want? I'll explain cultural context from the iOS jailbreaking community that can serve as some interesting early warning signs of problems that could happen in open source.
Business 2015-03-08 08:34:33 +0000
Britta Gustafson

* Becoming a Rocket Scientist With Open Source

The new space industry is expanding rapidly, with huge opportunities for open-source contributions. This talk focuses on the case study of Asterank, software that makes space data easier to access and explore. Its analysis and visualization tools have been used in government, private industry, and schools. The project has made public space data more open and usable for millions of people.
Hacks 2015-02-03 01:41:56 +0000
Ian Webster

* Better Meetings: 15 Tools in 45 Minutes

A lot can happen online, but sometimes you’ve just got to have face-to-face meetings with groups of clients or co-workers. They can be great! Or they can be a great big waste of time. This rapid fire presentation will take you through 15 tools you can use to get everyone focused at the beginning of your meeting, inspire creative collaboration during it, and make sure everyone goes home feeling good about what happened.
Business 2015-03-08 03:33:29 +0000
Maggie Starr

* Better Project Planning Through User Story Mapping

Learn how to improve your agile development process through User Story Mapping, a technique that you can use to gather requirements easier, get everyone on the same page, and plan out what needs to be done while keeping the "big picture" in mind.
Business 2015-02-09 21:42:45 +0000
Andrew Havens

* Bringing Open Source to the Federal Government

The story of how one federal agency decided to start living open source principles, built great tools, and attracted great developer talent.
Culture 2015-02-06 17:08:49 +0000
Bruce Arthur

* Build your own Ruby-powered Arcade Machine!

This session will cover the basics of game programming using Ruby, as well as the hardware you need in order to build and run your own Ruby-powered arcade machine.
Cooking 2015-02-09 22:09:49 +0000
Andrew Havens

* Building A "Steampunk Presentation Manipulation Apparatus" With A Raspberry Pi

The Raspberry Pi makes a fine little conference presentation machine, especially when it's packaged in a Steampunk theme. This talk highlights how to bring physical computing together with practical application to create a useful Linux-based device. I'll discuss idea generation, research, prototyping, challenges and use. We'll actually use the device with Libreoffice for the slides and a hacked Webcam to look at small parts.
Hacks 2015-03-08 19:22:54 +0000
Rob Reilly

* Building a Mobile Location Aware System with Beacons

What if instead of a broad location, you could have pinpoint location awareness of someone in a physical space. How could this change everything about how we interact with the physical world? In this session we will be exploring Beacon technology, which enables this, the underlying Bluetooth Smart standard, and how we can use these systems to change everything from shopping, to accessibility for the disabled, all built on top of a mobile device.
Hacks 2015-01-29 20:43:23 +0000
Jonathan LeBlanc

* Building better users

killer app: built. but how do you make it engaging? one way to get there is a rich, intuitive API. enabling people who use your app to remix the data, to use you as a building block in bigger causes means they are more likely to use you again, next time. Make it intuitive and users can self-serve - preserving your time and enabling inter-user idea exchange: let stack overflow work for you!
Culture 2015-03-08 06:04:33 +0000
chris mccraw

* Building Composable Services

Composable services and tools have been a hot topic lately. Learn why microservices can help bring your ideas to life faster while being more reliable and resilient. We'll show what frameworks and techniques you can use to build composable services and infrastructure, and help you avoid some of the common pitfalls.
Chemistry 2015-03-15 03:24:37 +0000
Noah Kantrowitz

* Business Planning for Improvisors

If you think your business is too small for a plan, or that you’ll come up with one later, this workshop is for you. We’ll use an easy template to help you think and talk about how your business works, and it may even help you see ways to improve it.
Business 2015-03-08 03:39:46 +0000
Maggie Starr

* Community Management on Freenode

Joining a FOSS project's leadership is rewarding, but if you haven't participated in IRC channel administration before, the learning curve can be daunting. Come to this talk to learn from edunham's 3 years of community management on IRC, and hear about how to avoid committing a variety of humorous but embarrassing mistakes.
Culture 2015-03-15 00:11:24 +0000
E. Dunham

* Compressing the white whale: how to learn by re-inventing.

"So this is where I made my biggest mistake, and I really still chuckle about it to this day. I notice that sometimes, when I'm trying to convert a word into a number, it's actually longer than the original word. So I get clever and just said 'hey if the word is shorter, just use the word.' Hey hey awesome, another small efficiency. What was wrong with that? Bingo, that number was already in use. So now Moby Dick compresses beautifully into an even smaller file, and even looks okay at first glance, until you try to read and see about half the sentences are now gibberish"
Cooking 2015-03-13 20:59:52 +0000
Toby Fee

* Cooking with Chef

Chef is in simple terms an infrastructure automation framework based on Ruby with a very cute name. However, its more than that and its uses are immeasurable. It is becoming the standard by which technology companies deploy and configure their system. Join me as we use dive deep into this framework and become true chefs ourselves.
Chemistry 2015-03-14 19:04:10 +0000
Johanni Thunstrom

* Corporate Source vs. Open Source

Has Open Source sold out? Has the corporate world somehow managed to take over the soul of open source without anyone noticing? When did open source "projects" requiring hundreds of thousands of dollars to participate become a thing?! In this talk we'll explore this and what it means for the OSS community at large.
Culture 2015-03-10 20:18:07 +0000
John Coggeshall

* Could Spambots Exist in Victorian England? and other questions about technology, society, and communication

As a tool for human communication, the internet has successes and failures. It allows us to meet people, collaborate, strengthen communities, and learn new things. It also enables oppression, harassment, and noise. These problems aren't new, but choices made in constructing the internet have often served to blindly facilitate their spread. Instead of continuing to assume that the technical, social, and economic constraints that kept such problems from destroying past systems will continue to hold, let's break down what's different from then to now, and find a new set of solutions.
Hacks 2015-02-25 04:35:16 +0000
Audrey Eschright

* Create your Making Money Machine

No, it's not a BitCoin mining machine. See what kind of vending machine you can create using open hardware and FOSS
Hacks 2015-01-20 17:29:20 +0000
Jeff Prestes

* Creating an Open Source Community for Distributed Networking from Scratch

Creating a vibrant open source community is more art than science. One of the challenges for any community is healthy community participation and stickiness. In this session, Adam will share his experience building a user/developer community for an open source distributed networking project from scratch.
Culture 2015-03-04 00:16:14 +0000
Adam Johnson

* Crypto 101

Let's make cryptography less cryptic. This talk would give you a peek into the fun world of ciphers and encryption mechanisms with a basic understanding of the hard problems of mathematics behind the magic.
Chemistry 2015-02-13 16:50:26 +0000
Niharika Kohli

* Cult-Driven Development

Communities around projects can be built in multiple ways, from reputation to evangelism, and many projects follow certain path towards popularity. OlegDB has taken a completely different path towards it's cult-following status, and I'll go over how a project that started as a joke now has a small, but active, community. I'll cover alternative marketing strategies, maintaining relationships on the internet and how to stay in charge of a FOSS project.
Hacks 2015-03-07 23:07:15 +0000
Quinlan P.

* Dipping Your Toe in the Ruby Water: Using Ruby with Non-Ruby Projects

This session will introduce you to the Ruby programming language by comparing it to PHP, and show some creative ways to start integrating Ruby with your non-Ruby projects.
Chemistry 2015-02-09 20:51:26 +0000
Andrew Havens

* Discovery Projects: Strategies for Defining the Opportunity

At a certain point an idea can become so big that you need to invest in a small project to properly define the big one. The objective of a discovery project is to define the goals & requirements, then narrow the "cone of uncertainty" enough so that the development process can begin on the right foot.
Business 2015-02-14 21:25:51 +0000
Tom Martin

* Dodge Disasters and March to Triumph as a Mentor

Good engineers write good code, but the best engineers raise the skills of their junior colleagues, too. If you're a senior Python engineer, you must learn to mentor new hires. Especially if you’re committed to diversity: mentorship is critical to the careers of women and minorities in tech. I have failed at mentoring, then succeeded. Learn from me and march to mentorship triumph.
Culture 2015-03-08 02:48:41 +0000
A. Jesse Jiryu Davis

* Don't hide: The AGPL as a business model

When you want to make a living from your app, open sourcing can be a difficult decision. What if... my future customers just find out they could rather use the software for free instead of paying us? What if... a service company takes on my product and delivers a better service than we do, after all they have more customer experience than us?
Business 2015-03-06 17:07:28 +0000
Henri Binsztok

* Engaging Nepali Kids with Free Software

Last year, I spent six months volunteering with a Nepali educational non-profit called Open Learning Exchange, which develops interactive educational activities for OLPC laptops used by students in elementary schools. During my talk, I will share my experience about what free software can do to provide better educational opportunities in these schools that lack resources and governmental support we take for granted.
Culture 2015-02-19 09:04:58 +0000
Martin Dluhoš

* Experiences Leading a User Group

This talk will walk through the timeline from when I first became involved as the organizer of a local user group, the good, the bad and where we are now. Not only will we look at my experience with the organizational aspect of leading a user group but also how group members can play an active and important role just as with an open source project.
Culture 2015-03-11 17:36:20 +0000
Chris Schaefer

* Failure for Fun and Profit!

Do you actually know how to deliberately acquire, sharpen, and retain a technical skill?
Culture 2015-02-19 18:17:27 +0000
Kerri Miller

* Geeks and the News Cycle

Large news entities - like Gawker and Huffington Post - that cater to casual and regular consumers get some of their most popular news stories from places like Reddit, Twitter, and HackerNews. Their news stories are sourced by the user generated content of these sites - the commons if you will - they digest them, and then profit from the advertising income. This talk will look into how this consumer-newsgiant-consumer dynamic treats the communities that it benefits from, how the 'merit' of news stories' ranking on popularity competition sites like reddit relate to the meritocracy in tech, and how people react to suddenly being at the center of a media storm.
Culture 2015-01-28 04:20:33 +0000
Simon Vansintjan

* Get Your Shoes (Back) On!

Years ago the enigmatic Rubyist _why created Shoes, a tiny GUI toolkit for writing fun, simple applications in Ruby. Shoes served as the foundation for Hackety Hack, a programming environment specially designed to be accessible to kids.
Chemistry 2015-01-17 00:40:15 +0000
Jason Clark

* Growing your open source project

Many open source software projects are interested in growing their user and contributor bases, but it can be hard to know where to start. This workshop will cover a number of steps projects can take to be more welcoming. Participants will work through a variety of structured, hands-on activities.
Culture 2015-03-05 03:12:34 +0000
Shauna Gordon-McKeon

* Homebrewing, Simple as Ruby

With a peculiar vocabulary, strict traditions, and heaps of arcane lore, brewing beer yourself can be overwhelming to the uninitiated… not unlike learning programming.
Hacks 2015-01-17 00:38:40 +0000
Jason Clark

* Hosting a Mini Workshops for Local User Groups

Discussion about how to both learn and host a mini-workshop for your local computer user group. Includes an actual walk-through a mini-workshop of SQL-interaction library.
Culture 2015-03-06 20:30:25 +0000
Howard Abrams

* How I learned to stop worrying and love crowdfunding

Are you an open source programmer looking to get more support for your work? Here's what we learned from our crowdfunding campaigns.
Business 2015-03-11 02:32:12 +0000
Mazarine Treyz, Steve Havelka

* How to be a maker ? - An introduction to Arduino and Raspberry Pi

The session will deal with basics of Arduino and Raspberry Pi and audience need not be a hardware geek.
Hacks 2015-03-13 09:16:47 +0000
Nidhiya V Raj

* How to Get a Software Job without Experience

Getting your first job is a Catch-22: to get a job, you need experience; to get experience, you need a job. Or do you?
Culture 2015-03-05 04:48:38 +0000
Charles Anderson

* How to Get People to Do Things (of their Own Free Will)

What’s the secret to getting people to do things? This presentation will provide interesting, useful, and 100% ethical tools and perspectives.
Culture 2015-03-08 03:36:39 +0000
Maggie Starr

* How to get people to open your newsletter and donate

If you've got a newsletter for your open source project, how can you make it more engaging? Start with that subject line.
Business 2015-03-10 23:04:46 +0000
Mazarine Treyz

* Improving performance with responsive (and responsible!) images

Attendees can expect concrete examples of how the new `picture` element and `srcset` attribute work, and to learn how they can use responsive and responsible images right now to improve performance and deliver the best possible experience to their users.
Chemistry 2015-03-14 22:56:12 +0000
David Newton

* Intermediate Bash

Level up your command line skills. Get tips for moving beyond mere proficiency at the command line.
Hacks 2015-03-06 08:56:55 +0000
Amy Boyle

* Keep calm, it's reverse engineering time

As developers, sometimes we have to investigate a bug, or add a new feature in a codebase that is completely new to us, often with no one available to ask anything about that code. How can we do this?
Cooking 2015-03-07 10:37:03 +0000
Alissa Bonas

* Learn from my fail: A/B Testing your landing page

ARGH! So hard to make your first landing page! I did so many things wrong that my domain was marked as spam! You'll learn what I did wrong, and how you can do it right the first time.
Business 2015-03-10 19:26:43 +0000
Mazarine Treyz

* Learning Open Source Business Backwards

Things get challenging sometimes. This is an experiment that I'm running, learning about business and open source by taking a sabbatical from all of it. I'll report back on what I learned, what I forgot, and what you might be able to take away from it as well.
Business 2015-03-15 04:52:47 +0000
Amye Scavarda

* maintaining sanity

an exploration of how i (failed?) to maintain several dozen foss projects, while maintaining my sanity
Culture 2015-03-06 15:46:49 +0000
Igor Galić

* Making music with Free/Libre/Open tools

The range of options for music-making on GNU/Linux with free/libre/open tools stretches from music-focused programming languages like CSound and PureData to simple tools like Audacity, Ardour, Guitarix, Hydrogen, and Musescore which are accessible to novice members of the general public. We'll explore the options for different sorts of musical creativity, focusing on the basic tools and how to get them set up effectively on GNU/Linux. In the session, we'll produce some brief compositions and recordings as we explore the software.
Hacks 2015-03-08 05:00:14 +0000
Aaron Wolf

* MOOC, LMS, and Other Acronyms in Education

One-hundred sixty thousand students signed up for the Stanford AI course. I use the phrase "the Stanford AI Course" because it is the one my colleagues use. In 2011, when Professors Sebasian Thrun and Peter Norvig taught their course on artificial intelligence online, open to any English speaker with an adaquate internet connection, they taught the first successful Massive Open Online Course (MOOC). Stanford, however, was far from the first to offer online courses, but those are talked about significantly less. In the mid-2000s, as an undergrad, I took a medical ethics course Carnegie Mellon was teaching under their Open Learning Initiative. The OLI, which was first funded by the William and Flora Hewlett Foundation in 2001, created a system for creating, hosting, and taking courses online. This was around the same time the same foundation also funded MIT's OpenCourseWare (disclosure, I used to work there). MITOCW, among other things, helped to set the Creative Commons Atribution Non-Commercial Share Alike (CC-BY-NC-SA) as a standard among open education resources.
Culture 2015-03-07 16:27:50 +0000
Molly de Blanc

* Naked and Afraid: Mobile Offline Access to Emergency Data

There's an emergency. You need critical information that you put in the cloud. But the internet and mobile networks are all down. What now?
Cooking 2015-03-09 00:32:27 +0000
Matt Woodward

* Numfar, do the dance of compatibility: moving languages forward without leaving users behind

Moving a language forward in backward incompatible ways is often necessary, but can be hard on users. In this talk, I'll compare and contrast approaches used to support older code bases in different languages, and look at what works and what doesn't.
Cooking 2015-01-20 00:53:35 +0000
Adam Harvey

* Objectivity is a Myth: Your Data is Not Objective and Neither Are You

Data is often treated as an impartial representation of reality--an unbiased delivery mechanism for "ground truth". Data collection, however, is designed by people, whose knowledge and beliefs influence the design decisions they make. How does that impact what we think we know, and how can we adapt our processes to account for it?
Culture 2015-03-08 01:37:51 +0000
Rachel Shadoan

* Onboarding and Mentoring Apprentices

Our work, industry, and culture can benefit from bringing fresh eyes into engineering. I’ve personally heard from many industry veterans that they want to mentor new engineers, but don’t know how to initiate a program or convince an organization that Apprentice engineers will add value to a team. Mentoring is rewarding for the apprentice and the Mentor, and a good mentor is critical for helping new engineers succeed.
Culture 2015-03-08 04:53:31 +0000
Mercedes Coyle

* Open Hardware and why it matters - MinnowBoard MAX case study

Open hardware is poised to change the world, particularly with the oncoming onslaught of IoT. If we can successfully migrate more of the industry to a model more closely resembling the open source software movement, we genuinely do stand a chance of changing the world.
Hacks 2015-03-08 07:01:48 +0000
John Hawley

* Open Source Hardware for Community Science

Closed-source scientific instrumentation doesn't work for community science. It's too expensive, too precise and delicate, and can't be repaired or rebuilt easily. Open-source hardware allows for a means of creating massive deployments of sensing systems, and pulling their data outputs together. This is the wave of the future.
Chemistry 2015-01-23 20:30:56 +0000
Pete Marchetto

* Patches: Stories of Open Source

Open source software is awesome. It provides the tools for our jobs, our hobbies, and our dreams. And anyone can contribute! Despite that openness, though, I hesitated for years before getting involved.
Culture 2015-01-17 00:36:36 +0000
Jason Clark

* Pop Open a Kernel

Ever wanted to build a simple kernel for a small computer? Curious how an OS starts and how it communicates with your keyboard and screen? Together, we'll build a simple arm kernel from scratch. No experience in assembly language or knowledge about CPU architecture is required, just some basic knowledge of C/C++ and curiosity about how things work under the hood.
Cooking 2015-03-12 02:54:04 +0000
Ian Kronquist

* Raising Money for your Startup

Raising money is straightforward but not easy. In this session, Adam will demystify the process on how to raise money for a startup, especially for first-time entrepreneurs.
Business 2015-03-03 23:28:37 +0000
Adam Johnson

* Ruby for Beginners: A Tour of the Ruby Language and Ecosystem

An introduction to Ruby programming for those who are new to software or new to Ruby specifically.
Chemistry 2015-03-07 17:45:03 +0000
Jonan Scheffler

* Ruby hacks for sanity on big projects

On larger projects with more teammates, basic sanity can be difficult. Here we will cover some sanity-saving measures, from single tests that you should always write, to overrides for ActiveRecord
Cooking 2015-03-12 03:57:31 +0000
Compiled Wrong

* Sass: What It Is, How It's Used, and Why It's So Syntactically Awesome

This talk will start off with the basics of what Syntactically Awesome StyleSheets are, what features and functionality they have to offer, and why they're a great tool to have in your arsenal. We'll then delve into how to use Sass in developing your own sites and what tools you'll want to use alongside it, complete with a live demo and some in-production examples.
Cooking 2015-02-13 20:41:18 +0000
Lucy Wyman

* Science Writing for the Small Screen with Osjourno-Webapplate

Science writers targeting the small screen are faced with a number of challenges. To address them, I've developed a workflow centered on RMarkdown authoring tools and the Mozilla Webapplate web app deployment framework.
Cooking 2015-03-08 03:24:05 +0000
M. Edward (Ed) Borasky

* Sharing Economy: Setting the foundation of the future economy

Sharing Economy has the potential to move the world towards sustainability and circular design. But what if we get it wrong? What if we the people don't participate in setting and maintaining the foundation of this future economy?
Culture 2015-01-27 11:03:11 +0000
aleksandr tsukanov

* So You Want To Write A Tech Article

Have you ever said, “I could write an article about that!”? Imagine what it feels like to walk into Barnes & Noble, pick up a magazine and see your article featured right there on the cover. Who do you contact? What's the process? What the heck is step one? In this talk, you'll get an insider's look at breaking into the mysterious world of tech article writing, from an industry veteran.
Hacks 2015-03-04 17:06:42 +0000
Rob Reilly

* Software Development and Stretched Analogies

Our perspective matters. Using interesting framing (while also laughing at the absurdity of it) can help us become better developers.
Cooking 2015-03-08 04:33:50 +0000
Kyle Jones

* Speaking for Non-Speakers

Many conference attendees come year after year without giving presentations. The sense that there's a high bar for perfection is pervasive, and people are afraid of being "wrong." Everyone has a story to tell about a problem they've solved or issues they've tackled. Learn how to share your experiences without fear, and join the speaker community!
Culture 2015-02-10 00:58:26 +0000
Kirsten Hunter

* Stop Building Monoliths!

All I needed to do was validate a postcode, and validating non-US postcodes can be tricky, so I didn't want to write that code myself. So I went to Google and searched on "postcode validate javascript". The first link was to a library, and it did postcode validation! Then I read the documentation. Postcode validation was a method. Of a form object. Not a HTML form object, but the library's form object. I'd have to import the whole framework, and rewrite my application, just to validate postcodes. Hold on here: postcodes are strings first, and maybe form elements later. But wouldn't validating a postcode be a method on a string?
Chemistry 2015-03-14 23:09:47 +0000
Emma Humphries

* Stuck in the MUD: Writing a Scalable & Asynchronous TCP Server in Ruby

An introduction of CarbonMU, my new open-source Ruby MUD platform, and Celluloid, the underlying Ruby concurrent/actor-based programming framework.
Chemistry 2015-03-07 00:41:49 +0000
Tim Krajcar

* Success is Bigger Than Not Failing: A passionate plea for criteria

We talk a lot about minimum viable products, and building our products up from small features. We talk a lot about failure, and how to learn from it and not replicate failures over and over again. But what I haven’t heard a lot of discussion about is how we know we’ve succeeded. Is it market share? Usable product? Could understanding and setting a measurable, achievable goals help us overcome imposter syndrome, second sock syndrome, and feature creep?
Hacks 2015-02-25 06:25:24 +0000
Heidi Waterhouse

* Talmudic Maxims to Maximize Your Growth as a Developer

You’ve been programming for a while now. You’re beginning to feel that you’ve got a handle on things but at the same time can’t escape the feeling that you’ve somehow plateaued in your growth as a software developer. In this talk Yitzchok, a rabbinic scholar and software developer, shares the “wisdom of the sages” as practical, actionable advice – strategies and tactics – that you can use to reinvigorate your growth as a software developer.
Culture 2015-02-27 16:41:28 +0000
Yitzchok Willroth

* Teaching Middle School to Program

This past year, I started an experiment and took a different approach to teaching middle school students how to program: Nothing. And you can do nothing too!
Culture 2015-02-07 04:24:27 +0000
Howard Abrams

* Technical Career Advice Discussion Panel

Are you starting your career in technology or already a seasoned vet? Come get advice and share what you have in a open discussion!
Business 2015-03-08 03:58:44 +0000
Kasey Alusi, Howard Abrams

* Telling the Open Source Stories that Make Users Love Projects

Stories help new users and developers connect with open source projects. Here's what you need to know to tell those stories.
Business 2015-03-07 21:41:34 +0000
Thursday Bram

* The Dead Language Fallacy

Our precious programming languages are being struck with a plague. Each year another language is declared dead or dying. But is that true or simply the tech equivalent of tabloid reporting?
Culture 2015-03-07 21:17:21 +0000
VM Brasseur

* The Ethics Of Software Development

The software we build has an impact on millions of people, and while it can be empowering for many, it is often disempowering for many others. Many times we as developers don't really think through these issues, and that is really a shame because the work we do has enormous impact on people's lives, and that impact is very often in opposition to a lot of the values that we hold dear. This session will talk through some of these issues, and explain why it is so important that we think about how we affect the world, and try to frame our work in a way that meshes well with our own values.
Culture 2015-02-18 19:42:28 +0000
Greg Dunlap

* The Github Guitar: Your Mobile Browser as a Distributed Musical Instrument

Almost everyone has a smartphone, and the majority can run Chrome or Safari. Wouldn't it be great if we could use our mobile devices as tools to allow non-musicians in on the act of performing... by generating harmonious tones or presenting lyrics in time with musicians playing traditional instruments? What if we could synchronize multimedia events over dozens if not thousands of devices, simultaneously? Well, we can! The technology exists today, in your pocket. The singalong.js suite enables these types of ad-hoc musical collaborations in various combinations, in real time, with no perceptible latency, and without the use of a click track or other such draconian control system. The best thing is, it’s licensed under the GPL and uses lots of open libraries to make it happen.
Hacks 2015-02-20 19:07:29 +0000
Ross Brackett

* The Leap: Building Something Cool as a Beginner

The leap from learning to doing in programming can be terrifying. One hundred step-by-step tutorials will not teach you as much as solving one tough problem in code. This talk will present a process for taking that leap. And I’ll show you how I used that process to build a software plugin that lets you program in plain English.
Hacks 2015-03-07 22:06:13 +0000
Stephanie Losi

* The Open Educator -- Practical Advice for Applying Open Source Practices and Resources to K-12 Hands-on Learning

This talk is geared toward teachers, informal educators, or anyone interested in engaging k-12 youth. It will cover common problems encountered when adapting open source technology and suggest ways to combine open source to other learning movements such as Maker Education and Common Core.
Cooking 2015-03-15 04:04:07 +0000
Alice Rice

* The Psychology of Open Communities

Open source software may be made of ones and zeroes, but open source communities are made of people. This talk is a whirlwind tour of what research psychology has to tell us about how individuals and groups learn, falter, and grow. The talk will emphasize "takeaways" - ways for you to use this research to improve your communities and your experiences in them.
Culture 2015-03-04 22:52:09 +0000
Shauna Gordon-McKeon

* Three Bug Stories

Learn to write better code by hearing interesting ways that code has gone wrong!
Cooking 2015-03-08 03:29:05 +0000
Moss Collum

* Time for Change: How to approach an OS project switchover

So, who here has an open source project they maintain? Ok, of those people, who calls out or references. Who's had the other thing change in a certain way causing bugs and general headaches? It's a pretty common problem in open source, especially when you're dealing with API's and such. Eventually, services change, move, change, or even shut down completely. And it becomes a tricky decision on how to deal with this change, and how to switch over from an old service to the new. I'm going to talk about how you approach sun-setting interfacing with an old version of a service, and switching over to the new version, cleanly, with lots of spec coverage and testing. I'm not going to pretend that. We're not even fully finished with the switchover yet, and there's still plenty more to learn. But hopefully you won't make the same mistakes we did.
Cooking 2015-02-11 17:33:55 +0000
Peter Souter

* User Style Zen: Balancing Standarization, Customization, and Accessibility

More and more, social media sites are allowing users to customize and style their own profiles and pages. On one hand, this lets people show their individuality and make their mark on their content. On the other, it presents problems for developers who want to make these options available, but have to balance that with site security and usability.
Culture 2015-03-08 04:38:46 +0000
Ruth Hatch

* View-first, and you can too.

In a world predominantly powered by MVC webapps, view-first web development provides a more designer and front-end developer friendly alternative to the convention. We'll look at how view-first development manifests itself in the Lift Web Framework, some of the benefits we get from it, and how that might translate into other languages and frameworks.
Cooking 2015-02-21 04:16:53 +0000
Matt Farmer

* Web Applications and a Brighter Future for Open Source Adoption

In this talk, we discuss how web applications changed expectations of both sysadmins and end users, and what open source projects and organizations can do to help open source thrive in the web ecosystem. Attend and you’ll see a brief reminder of how web apps changed the developer-user relationship in open source, how some open source web app communities have reacted, what tools exist to get past the hosting barrier, and how your open source web app project can thrive.
Business 2015-03-07 06:33:38 +0000
Philip James

* Web Performance: Beginner to Expert to Crazy Person

There’s no such thing as fast enough. You can always make your website faster. This talk will show you how.
Cooking 2015-03-13 23:10:51 +0000
Philip Tellis

* What Can Software Teams Learn from Square Dancing?

In this talk, I’ll demonstrate things I've learned from square dancing that I’ve found applicable to software development, sometimes in surprising ways. These lessons can help us all write better software and have a better time doing it!
Culture 2015-03-08 03:53:19 +0000
L Dean

* Who wants to make video games?

"So how do you get that beautiful art style that you really want? Your game is done, maybe feature complete, but it's either got your crummy drawings or just grey rectangles dancing around. The music, the sound, the look of a game like 'Dungeon of the Endless' or 'Journey,' how do you get THAT? I have good news for you: there are more artists than there are coders, and more musicians than there are human beings on earth. Yes you'll have to pay them, yes you'll have to handle some conversations about expectations, and I'll cover that shortly, but really it will amaze you how easy it is to find truly beautiful resources to populate your game"
Business 2015-03-13 21:11:48 +0000
Toby Fee

* Why nobody cares about your GitHub project

Open source is hard. Everybody tells you to create a GitHub account and start throwing your code out there. Once you do, you realize that nobody really cares. In this talk, we'll see what you can do to increase the visibility of your work and how this can dramatically affect the quality of your project.
Chemistry 2015-02-24 15:16:27 +0000
Zeno Rocha

* Writing debuggable code

Let's talk about the Do's and Don'ts that make code easier to debug (because let's face it, we will all write bugs at some point in our coding careers).
Cooking 2015-03-08 04:31:29 +0000
Jonathan Harker

* You Should Speak

Have you ever thought about speaking at a conference, then come up with some excuse like "I don't know enough", "I'm scared of public speaking", or "I don't know where to apply"? Come to this talk to learn how to combine the open source tools and technolgies which solve all of those problems and more!
Cooking 2015-03-15 03:17:15 +0000
E. Dunham