Elana Hashman's favorites

Favorite sessions for this user

* A Domain Specific Query Language Engine

This presentation is about the shortest line between a database and data exploration.
Theory
Joe Meyer

* An Introduction to ClojureScript

ClojureScript is a fun, productive language that compiles to JavaScript. Though its syntax is a different its functional immutable nature lets you be productive when developing complex web applications.
Theory
Julio Barros

* API Design Through the Lens of Photography

To be successful in photography and API design, you must first understand the constraints of the medium, both technical and non-technical. Learning how to work within constraints and finding your own style are critical to being a successful photographer and API designer.
Theory
Bryan Hughes

* Behind Closed Doors: Managing Passwords in a Dangerous World

A modern application has a lot of passwords and keys floating around. Encryption keys, database passwords, and API credentials; often typed in to text files and forgotten. Fortunately a new wave of tools are emerging to help manage, update, and audit these secrets. Come learn how to avoid being the next TechCrunch headline.
Practice
Noah Kantrowitz

* Bringing OOP Best Practices to the World of Functional Programming

I transitioned from writing software in imperative, object-oriented (OO) programming languages to doing functional programming (FP) full-time, and you can do it, too! In this talk, I'll make a case for FP in the corporate development environment, cover some cases where common FP language features substitute for design patterns and OOP structure, and provide some examples of translating traditional OO design patterns into functional code.
Practice
Elana Hashman

* Corporate Open Source Fail

What makes companies with good intentions fail so miserably at open source? How can we (as engineers and managers) influence our bosses to "do the right thing"?
Business
Sarah Sharp

* Exit Condition: when to ragequit, raise hell, or duck and cover

If you're caught in a job or a project where you simply can't convince your colleagues or organization to treat you with respect, it often feels like you're in a maze with no clear way out. (Un)fortunately, you're not alone. There's no universal solution to navigating a toxic or abusive workplace, but there's power in finding a theoretical context, sharing our stories, and learning from each other. Come learn about the options of voice, loyalty, and exit, and hear the stories of others who have had to make hard choices.
Culture
Frances Hocutt

* Free Culture in an Expensive World

Money is a common worry, inside the open source community and out, but we often feel uncomfortable discussing it. We’ll talk about why that is and how our social norms around money impact who participates in open source and how they do so. The heart of this talk will be a series of case studies based on interviews with community members covering various economic models for open source, including worker co-ops, grant-funded and academic projects, for-profit business models, crowdfunding campaigns, and all-volunteer projects. We’ll explore the sustainability of each model as well as how they deal with the social pressures outlined in the first part of the talk.
Business
Shauna Gordon-McKeon

* Hard Problems in Terms of Service Enforcement

When you run an online service, you always hope you won't have to deal with abuse. But it's inevitable, and many situations aren't clear-cut as you might wish. Some examples of abuse are obvious, but this talk explores the grey areas and messy questions: what content should you consider a violation of your Terms of Service, and how do you handle it when it's reported to you?
Culture
Denise Paolucci

* Introduction to Clojure

Move fast and break things in this 100-minute, introductory-level Clojure workshop!
Practice
Katherine Fellows

* Kubernetes 101

So you've containerized your application, and now you want to deploy it scalably across a cluster. Kubernetes is your tool for container service management; learn how to use it.
Practice
Josh Berkus

* Little Leaks Sink Your Tests

"The tests pass on my machine." "Wait, it was working a minute ago." "Oh, that test is flaky sometimes." Unpredictable tests are toxic for our productivity. They undermine confidence in our code. They encourage us to wallpaper over the immediate problem, rather than fixing the underlying cause. In this presentation, we'll talk about a chief cause of flaky tests: leaky global state.
Practice
Ian Dees

* Open Source is People

For those who want to do more than just code, this talk will show you 8 ways I have contributed without opening up Vim once.
Culture
Justin Dorfman

* Rethinking Social Media, Privacy, and Information Flow from the Ground Up

Inspired by security and privacy research in operating systems, we'll be discussing possible ways to redesign privacy models so that all users can have fine-grained control over both visibility of their content and how others can interact with it.
Theory
Clarissa Littler

* Sparkle security

"Agent Sparkle, you have been recruited as a security expert to use your skills to protect the kingdom of Project Rainbow. You might not feel qualified yet, but Project Rainbow has great faith in your ability to learn." Web security is perhaps one of most fun types of computer security to master: exploits can be constructed quickly and without many tools. But sadly, while there are many tutorials, they simply don't have enough rainbows and sparkles and the practice exploits tend to focus on the basics without flourishes. Project Sparkle is a set of "training missions" designed to make learning web security more kid-friendly, but we think the audience of Open Source Bridge will also enjoy exploiting the web to add more rainbows and sparkles!
Practice
Terri Oda

* Spelunking with ǝpoɔᴉu∩

What do a fistbump emoji, Mandarin Chinese, and rocket ships have in common? They're all represented with entries in Unicode, the biggest, baddest, and most widely-used open standard. In this talk, we'll explore the messy and conflicting ideas that humans call "text", and how we represent those ideas in software.
Theory
John Feminella

* Standardizing the Social Web - W3C #socialweb specs

The W3C Social Web Working Group has been developing standards to make it easier to build social applications in the open web. In this talk, you'll get an overview of the various specifications in development, (Activity Streams 2, Webmention, Micropub, and ActivityPub), to help you learn how each applies to the social web.
Theory
Aaron Parecki

* Sustainable Career Development: Advancing While Still Having Free Time

In this talk, we'll examine the pressure in the tech industry to participate in work-related extracurriculars like side projects and meetups. We'll analyze where these expectations come from, what they're actually getting at, and talk about ideas for progressing in our careers without losing sight of the things in life that make us happy outside of work.
Culture
Noelle Daley

* Taking no for an answer

Open source (like many fields) rewards people who are confident and even a bit pushy. So we give talks encouraging folk to get over imposter syndrome, lean in, say yes to more things. But self-improvement shouldn't focus only on our most vulnerable members, but also our most powerful. So let's talk not about saying yes, but about hearing no. Learning to take no for an answer can transform efforts such as security, diversity and mentoring where we have few experts or volunteers and great need. Let's talk about accepting "defeat" with grace, and how to take "no" for an answer while still moving forwards.
Culture
Terri Oda

* The Ability to Disable: Who Did You Forget When You Designed Your UI?

While the increased use of technology has in some ways improved the lives of those with disabilities, there is a gap that still needs to be filled. Uncaptioned or poorly captioned videos leave the deaf and hard of hearing community out of the loop, untagged photos leave blind users unaware of integral information, and poorly coded webpages are too much of a hassle for individuals using screen readers. But what if this was this was different? What if we thought about all of the potential users of our technology and developed programs intentionally allowing access for everyone? How could we make a programmer’s work truly inclusive, truly open to everyone? Experiential learning often provides those ‘a ha!’ moments, so together we’ll enjoy some mis-captioned videos, have a ‘listen-along’ to what a screen reader sounds like when a page is not coded correctly, and take a look at the end users’ experience when software is not programmed with a disabled audience in mind. Then, we’ll talk about what we can do to improve the current offerings and answer, “what next?”
Culture
Rebecca Jennings

* The Politics of Cooption in Open Source and Free Software

The Open Source and Free Software community is no longer simply a patchwork of hobbyist communities. Our change and growth brought many advantages, but some disadvantages too. We now operate in a microcosm not unlike the larger USA and international political climates. Hear the story of how it operates from an political insider.
Culture
Bradley Kuhn

* Towards an Ethics of Care: Understanding and Acknowledging Care Work in Technology Companies

This talk explores dimensions of care work and best practices for acknowledging and understanding care work in technology teams, and makes the business case for considering all involved with building and maintaining technologies in strategy and planning. I explore ways in which to track the hidden costs of care work, and build a discourse of sustainability and inclusion around care work in technology companies.
Business
Amelia Abreu

* Type Theory 101

Have you heard about type theory and always wanted to understand the principles behind it, but always thought it was too complicated since it has a lot of Lambda Calculus and algebras? This talk will approach these concepts in a friendly way.
Theory
Hanneli Tavante

* Working Around a Project with Twenty Years of Precedents

How do you deal with a free software project that has been ongoing for many years? What happens when the original designers moved on long ago and even the elders don’t have all the answers? This session will examine how to work with existing precedents to drive evolution of the project.
Culture
Darrick Wong

Favorite proposals for this user

* Diving into distributed microservices architecture with Kubernetes on AWS and GCE

When designing a reliable solution with lots of moving parts, it's important to look not just into code but in-between code - more at the integration parts of the overall system. In this intense talk you will learn about the variety of real-world important aspects to take into account architecting a flexible microservices based solution. Some of the valuable aspects are environment choices, infrastructure planning, preparation and automation, separation of solution parts into independently deployable services, service discovery, replication, resiliency and many more. You will explore into the practical architecture of Kubernetes, see how to create and configure Kubernetes cluster on AWS and GCE, create and prepare containerized services to be deployed into the cluster.
Practice 2016-04-19 18:25:34 +0000
Alena Hall

* From Mobile First to Offline First

It's all too easy assume that your web or mobile app will run on a fast and reliable network with great coverage. The reality for your app's users, though, is often a slow and unreliable network with spotty coverage. What happens when the network doesn't work, or when the device is in airplane mode? You get unhappy, frustrated users. Building on the principles of mobile first, offline first is an approach to application design in which a web, mobile, desktop, or Internet of Things (IoT) application is built for offline usage first and is then progressively enhanced to take advantage of network connectivity when available.
Practice 2016-04-14 19:20:48 +0000
Bradley Holt

* In the Trenches of Open Source Culture: The Node.js Inclusivity Working Group

The goal of this working group strikes deep at the heart of problems in open source software. We hear the stories of contentious and dramatic flare-ups, but not the day to day work people do to make things better. Come learn what it's like and what it takes to make a difference in OSS culture.
Culture 2016-04-16 02:04:52 +0000
Bryan Hughes

* Introduction to rkt: A secure, modular container engine

CoreOS rkt is a secure, modular execution engine for app containers. It was designed to reflect the lessons of running container cluster infrastructure at scale and is released under the Apache license. Written in Go, rkt implements container isolation through a flexible and interchangeable set of “stages,” providing multiple execution regimes for a container image. At rkt’s core is a command line utility that does not invoke a long-running daemon process, making app container lifecycle management simpler and allowing loosely-coupled integrations with service management and orchestration systems like systemd and Kubernetes.
Theory 2016-04-21 00:34:57 +0000
Josh Wood

* Machine Ethics and Emerging Technologies

An autonomous car is driving down a single-lane road carved out of a cliff. Unexpectedly, a child runs in front the car chasing a ball, and trips. The car cannot stop in time to avoid a fatal collision, but it can sacrifice itself and its passenger by driving off the cliff. Should it? And if so, would you buy such a car?
Theory 2016-04-14 07:32:44 +0000
Paul Fenwick

* Made in the Machine: New Cultural Practices, Critical Analyses, and Techniques in Digital Fabrication, Making, and Manufacturing

I first knowingly witnessed the "Maker Movement" in 2010, heeded its siren call by joining the MIT Media Lab in 2011, and became disillusioned later that year. But I've been stubbornly making--and critiquing the notions of Making--ever since.
Culture 2016-04-11 00:20:51 +0000
Arlene Ducao

* Software Patents After Alice: A Long and Sad Tail

The Supreme Court's ruling in the landmark Alice vs. CLS Bank case has finally given the lower courts some tools they could use to overturn obvious and vague patents, particularly frivolous patents on software. But we haven't won, because bogus patent suits are still being filed. This talk is for anyone who is wondering what the recent decisions mean for small and mid-size entities, how international treaties can impact local policy and what can be done to improve the situation.
Business 2016-04-13 17:05:45 +0000
Deb Nicholson

* Technical writing as public service: working on open source in government

What if U.S. federal agencies decided to reuse and contribute to open source software projects built by other agencies, since agencies often have similar technology problems to solve? And what if they hired technical writers with open source community experience to write documentation for these projects? That would be pretty cool. Also, that’s my work. I'm part of 18F, a digital services consulting team within and for the federal government, and all of our work is open source.
Practice 2016-04-06 00:21:15 +0000
Britta Gustafson

* The High Barrier to Entry in Tech for the Underpriviliged

When you are trying to transition into tech, it helps to be part of an open source community that welcomes people from all types of backgrounds and experience-levels. If you are a beginner programmer and underprivileged, the search for the right tech community can be a daunting experience. You may be systematically excluded from participating in some communities by gatekeepers. As a programmer who comes from a marginalised community, allow me to share with you the story of how I found a programming community that welcomed and helped me to overcome the high barrier to entry in tech. This talk aims to encourage everyone to do their bit to create inviting communities for the underprivileged.
Culture 2016-04-08 23:02:52 +0000
Khalid A

* Transpreneur: Tales of a FTM Transgender Entrepreneur

The primary reason I was able to make career pivots at Intel was due to my connections to the Women at Intel network. Through this network I was referred to career counselors, business contacts, and the technical experts I needed to move my career ahead. As an FTM, my inbox is still filled with opportunities from women in tech groups, but now when I see these emails I wonder if I will be welcomed or not. A recent email I received said specifically "if you are female please attend." As a person who now identifies as male, I find that my connection to the community that supported me for the entirety of my career is now becoming tenuous.
Culture 2016-04-14 15:35:59 +0000
Sev Leonard

* What Shipping Containers Can Teach Us About Digital Content Standards

Global trade wouldn’t be as efficient without the invention - and standardization - of shipping containers. Standardized containers have globalized our economy across the shipping industry in a way that wouldn’t have been possible otherwise. What can this earlier standardization effort teach us about the tools and systems we’re building today? What are the struggles of our digital age? How are the struggles of shipping goods in 1950s similar to our content struggles now - and how can we move forward?
Theory 2016-04-11 18:07:00 +0000
Kendra Skeene, Nikhil Deshpande