Josh Simmons's favorites

Favorite sessions for this user

* Badging and Beyond: Rubrics and Building a Culture of Recognition as Community Building Strategies

What are the qualities you need more of in your open source community?
Culture
Larissa Shapiro

* On the Shoulders Of Giants - Emacs for the Curious

With the need for flexible editors to handle the variety of programming languages we face regularly, the Emacs community is experiencing another renaissance. Let's get you started with Emacs and I'll show you how to become proficient quickly.
Chemistry
Howard Abrams

* Performance strategies for delivering web fonts at Wikipedia scale

Wikipedia supports almost 300 languages for its multilingual content communities. As mixed script web pages become pervasive and non-Latin language content grows exponentially, a breakthrough technology of delivering webfonts on demand has been deployed across 900 Wikimedia sites. This talk discusses user benefits derived from this technological advance as well some of the performance and scalability improvements made to deliver fonts at Wikipedia scale.
Chemistry
Alolita Sharma

* "Why are these people following me?": Leadership for the introverted, uncertain, and astonished

So you've had an idea, or noticed a gap that needs filling, or wondered why no one's talking about an issue you care about. Like the motivated and competent person you are, you start working, or writing, or talking. People start noticing you, listening to you, even asking for your opinion about their own projects--and one day, you realize they're treating you just like you treat your own role models. You find this unsettling. Surely motivation and competence aren't that special, you think. You, a leader? Can't be. And if you actually are a leader, what do you do now?
Culture
Frances Hocutt

* A short examination on the intersection of security and usability (or How usable security could save us all)

This talk is geared for people with minimal experience with usability and some experience with security
Chemistry
Morgan Miller

* Advanced Javascript Basics for Web Developers

Javascript is a necessity for modern web development. Whether it is to add more interactivity to your user interface, or provide a client to interact with your API, chances are, even if you're trying to avoid working in javascript, you're working in javascript. Projects like Coffeescript and Opal, while useful, still do not help understand the javascript outputted by these compile-able languages. One growing concern in this realm is that an application's javascript can sometimes be a security concern, easily exploited by a malicious user. In order to catch these concerns, you must know what your javascript does, inside and out. This talk will illustrate concepts to make sure your client code is secure, while still giving your team the flexibility it needs to keep building your stellar app!
Chemistry
Lauren Voswinkel

* Airplanes : Sailboats :: Mobile : Desktop

What if the way that airplanes were designed and how it improved sailing had some deep lessons around the future of user experience? Sailboats improved significantly after the discovery of flight, and mobile design is improving a great deal of user experience as well. How can we think about applying these lessons? What's still missing?
Culture
Amye Scavarda

* An Adventure in Data Modeling: The Entity-Attribute-Value Model

A case study on the trials of Emma's performance when implementing the Entity-Attribute-Value data model on their PostgreSQL database systems.
Chemistry
Mark Wong

* Beyond Leaning In: How to Negotiate to Get What You Want

Now that you know how important it is to ask for want you want, come learn how to negotiate in a way that will get you what you need. For everyone of any gender identity who works at a company or freelances, who feels like a newb or an expert, this presentation will teach you effective, practical skills to improve your negotiations and deal confidently with conflicts.
Business
Katie Lane

* Build your own exobrain

Online services like "If This Then That" (IFTTT) are great for automating your life. However they provide limited ways for the end-user to add their own services, and often require credentials that one may normally wish to keep secret. The 'exobrain' project allows for service integration and extension on a machine *you* control.
Cooking
Paul Fenwick

* Civilizing IRC and forums: moderation strategies for mutual respect

As a project's public IRC channel or forum grows, it's hard to keep it friendly. People get frustrated with each other, people have "different" senses of humor, disagreements escalate...oh goodness, it can be a mess. This isn't great for retaining community members or welcoming new ones. I'll share my strategies for dealing with problems, learned at the scale of hundreds of forum threads, tens of thousands of forum visitors, and dozens of IRC chatters every day.
Culture
Britta Gustafson

* Code review for Open Source

Everyone knows that code quality is important, but what can we do to actually ensure that our codebases meet the standards we'd like? This talk dives into how to implement code review in your project. What do patch authors need to do, what do patch reviewers need to do, what strategies can you implement to get the best results, and how can you leverage code review to grow your community?
Culture
Alex Gaynor

* Confessions of a DBA: worst and best things I've done in production

In the past 15 years, I've done some pretty horrendous things around the M in LAMP. I will balance this with good things I've done too.
Cooking
Emily Slocombe

* Crash Course in Tech Management

Managing is a skill which you can master just as you did programming. This session will introduce you to many of the skills and resources you’ll need to become a successful tech manager (and keep your team from wanting to string you up).
Business
VM Brasseur

* Data, Privacy, & Trust in Open Source: 10 Lessons from Wikipedia

Few people today are not concerned with the way data is used to enhance or subvert individual privacy. This is especially true on the Web, where open source technologies are behind much of what we interact with and use on a daily basis. As the most fundamental aspects of our lives become networked -- social relationships, work, finance, and even how we get our food -- how can we make sure that open source technologies foster a sense of trust with users, protect their privacy, and still give data scientists the tools they need to gain insight?
Culture
Steven Walling

* Deconstructing Open Source Contributions

Everyone wants to make contributing to open source projects more accessible and fun. But how do we do that? One way is to analyze past contributions to identify potential obstacles and opportunities for intervention and support. This workshop will use our own experiences as contributors to explore how the process works, using a simple but effective reflective activity.
Culture
Shauna Gordon-McKeon

* DIY User Research for Open Source Projects

Open source is only about open code, right? Wrong. Interviews, questionnaires, quick usability tests, and many other research types all have a place in the open source development process. With a few easy steps and a set of scripts to follow, your community can make user research an easy and essential component of your open source project.
Culture
Erin Richey

* Explicit Invitations: Passion is Not Enough for True Diversity

Open Source suffers from a lack of diversity. Underrepresented populations, for systemic reasons, might never show up unless Open Source communities 'hack' themselves through explicit invitation & removing barriers to participation. Mozilla is funding two pilot studies designed to explicitly reach out to underrepresented groups in open source today. Seeking people who like to solve problems and then engaging them in a 6 week, full time accelerator program we hope to explore the question: Can we seed our communities by hacking the social/cultural/systemic issues in order to gain technical contributions from a more diverse set of minds and give to participants an experience in tech that might have long term benefits to them?
Hacks
Lukas Blakk

* Extreme Software Portability as an Art Form

Writing portable software is hard. Throw in thousands of bad and worse shared hosting configurations, a decade of technical debt, the need to cater to a sprawling ecosystem, and PHP — and you have WordPress. We've found breaking changes harm our community and unfairly punish our users, so we don't make them. But that doesn't mean we don't innovate or evolve — we're just forced to get really clever. And it works, with adoption continuing to soar.
Hacks
Andrew Nacin

* Feminist Point of View: Lessons From Running the Geek Feminism Wiki

The Geek Feminism wiki is one of the central resources for feminist activism in geek communities ranging from open source software to science fiction fandom. Learn how the GF wiki started, how it's run, and what we've learned about doing activism the wiki way.
Culture
Alex Bayley

* Forking Pop Culture and Remixing Code: Where Open Movements Intersect

Creative open culture communities operate in many of the same ways as open source communities and share many of the same principles. How are fan writers like open source contributors? What can hackers learn from remixers (and vice versa)? And what happens when creative communities start building open source projects to support their own work?
Culture
Nancy McLaughlin

* Freedom, security and the cloud

Cloud hosting is cheap. Cloud hosting is easy. What compromises are you making when you deploy to the cloud, both in terms of your security and in terms of your dependency on proprietary software?
Chemistry
Matthew Garrett

* From navel gazing to ass kicking: Building leadership in the journalism code community

Amidst all the hand wringing surrounding the "future of journalism," developers, designers, and data geeks working in newsrooms are building projects and tools that engage readers and ripple across the web. We'll discuss ways this community welcomes, supports, and promotes new members and leaders.
Culture
Erika Owens

* From the Bottom Up: Building Community-Owned and -Operated Mesh Networks

This panel highlights the work of a few folks representing part of a broad, international movement consisting of network engineers, community change makers, researchers, architects, and thinkers who are building decentralized and autonomous communications infrastructure. We know that the Internet is deeply broken, and we are rebuilding, from the inside out. We mitigate the ills of interception and interference on the net by facilitating networks that are owned, operated, and governed by the people that use them.
Culture
Jenny Ryan, Mitar Milutinovic, Marc Juul, Russell Senior

* Futel: the future of the past of telephony

Futel is more than a collection of payphones installed in publicly accessible locations. Find out what we hope to achieve by starting a free telephone network.
Hacks
Karl Anderson

* Geek Choir

A hands-on session in which we show how to increase team identity, cohesion, and collaboration via singing.
Culture
Michael Alan Brewer

* Generational Relay: Passing the Open Source Torch

People leave Open Source projects, and that's ok. Failing to plan for it isn't. How one community is recovering from the loss of its first generation and preparing for the rise of its third.
Culture
Eric Steele

* Get more contributors! Lessons from the Drupal Ladder.

A small contributor pool is a recipe for burnout and can harm or hold back your project. Learn how offering a structured approach for step-by-step skill-building can combat imposter syndrome and build community, thereby increasing the number and diversity of your project's contributors.
Culture
Rhys Fureigh

* Hacking In-Group Bias for Fun and Profit

Our lives and social interactions are governed by sociology and psychology. As geeks, we strive to understand how the technology around us works, and we strive to find ways to make it better. Society is basically one big, complex piece of technology, and, like all technology, it is hackable. This talk will explain how you can do that.
Culture
Kat Toomajian

* History of Concurrency

With new languages like Dart, Go, and Rust coming with powerful concurrency primitives (and languages like C# & Java adding more concurrency features), it's important to know where these ideas come from and where concurrency handling is headed.
Chemistry
Michael Schurter

* How I Learned Haskell by Writing Tiny Games

Earlier this year, I started teaching myself Haskell by using it to write short, text-based games. In this session I'll share what I learned, both about Haskell and about learning new things.
Hacks
Moss Collum

* Internet Archive: More than the Wayback Machine

In this session we will: * Give you a tour of Internet Archive and its collections * Introduce you to the APIs and tools you can use to access and contribute to the Archive * Show examples of how other people and institutions are using the Archive
Chemistry
VM Brasseur, Alexis Rossi

* IPv6 for Programmers

IPv4 is running out of addresses. IPv6 is the Internet Protocol which gives plenty of addresses for the future. It is starting to be deployed widely and open source applications and programming languages need to support it.
Chemistry
Ian Burrell

* It's Dangerous to Go Alone: Battling the Invisible Monsters in Tech

It can be hard to focus on your love of coding when you are regularly battling invisible issues like insecurity, anxiety, and lack of confidence. This talk will identify invisible issues programmers struggle with, talk about their impact, discuss personal experiences dealing with them, and share some tools useful in fighting back.
Culture
Julie Pagano

* Keeping your culture afloat through a tidal wave of interest ~~\o/~~

During the height of interest to the project, there were often several new people arriving in the channel per day. That may not sound like a lot, but everyone had questions and would be interested in different things; it could take a twenty minute conversation or so with someone who knew a lot about the project in order to properly greet, inform, and orient new people. The founders didn't have a few spare hours around the clock to personally devote to making sure that each new arrival was welcomed, felt welcomed, had their questions answered, and had their willingness to contribute channeled into something which needed the help and suited their skills. There was a lot about this that we could have automated or dumped into a higher-latency format like email. The first time someone proposed automating the welcoming dance it was like they'd slapped me in the face. The personal touch bit was crucial, and automating it would have struck all the wrong notes. The project was supposed to be for people, by people, and showing that we're human and we're committed to keeping it small and personal was crucial to keeping the culture intact.
Culture
Azure Lunatic, Kat Toomajian

* Knitting for programmers

Yeah, you've seen us knitting during talks. I promise we're paying more attention than the people with their laptops open. Well, now learn how we do what we do... the programmer way. I'll start with the topology of individual stitches and go through geometry to design patterns, and by the end of it you'll know how to knit a sweater.
Hacks
Alex Bayley

* Learn you some Lisp for Great Good

Lisp is a wise sage atop a snowy mountain, waiting for students to climb and level up their programming prowess. Pray tell, how does one scale such lofty peaks? This session introduces Lisp for twenty-first century programmers.
Chemistry
Howard Abrams

* Learning Open Source as a course in Africa University

PHP, MySql, PhoneGap, PrestaShop, Magento, Wordpress, Drupal.
Culture
Olainiyan Adewale

* Life-Hacking and Personal Time Management for the Rest of Us

Almost all the books and articles out there about taking Agile methods into your personal life seem geared to people who have control over their schedules. What about those of us who have childcare, eldercare, or other incompressible schedule demands?
Hacks
H. Waterhouse

* Make your wireless router route (or anything else) the way you want it to, with OpenWrt.

How to build an OpenWrt image from source to do just what you want it to on your suitably chosen hardware.
Cooking
Russell Senior

* Making your mobile web app accessible

Accessibility - It's important. Learn how to make your mobile web app accessible to everyone.
Cooking
Eitan Isaacson

* Math vs. Mathematics

Most people got through their high school math classes by memorizing nonsensical statements and regurgitating them on command. If you came out of that class hating math, no one would blame you, especially not a mathematician. However, that class didn't teach Intro to Algebra, it taught Intermediate Following Instructions.
Chemistry
Georgia Reh, Jenner Hanni

* Modern Home Automation

There are a few different options available to you to control your home automation system. Many manufacturers make it convenient to use their system by not only making a convenient to install their products and use their interface, but will actually host all the software portions for you. Many provide apps for your IOS or Android device and have web interfaces for your laptop as well, making the control of these devices very streamlined and simple, especially if there are many devices to be managed. Other more DIY-approach solutions also have interfaces to control your automation, although require a bit more setup. For example, with the power strip in the previous example, you first need to connect it to your wireless network, and then you'll be able to use the supplied phone/tablet app to toggle the ports on/off. As with anything DIY: The sky's the limit, although it requires more technical understanding of what's going on.
Cooking
Ben Kero

* Modernizing a Stagnant Toolbox

WordPress turned 10 years old in May of 2013. On that day, the main repo didn't contain a single tool to make it easier for developers to work with and contribute code. Over the last year, this is how and why we changed all that.
Hacks
Aaron Jorbin

* My Journey into Open Source Design

Becoming a contributing designer on an open source project is often tougher than contributing code. The pathways to designing for open source projects are often unclear. Using my own experience joining the WordPress project, I'll share how I think open source projects can make it easier for designers to contribute their skills.
Cooking
Mel Choyce

* NerdCred++; How to Customize your Bash Prompt

The terminal is a powerful tool on any developer’s belt. The command line interface provides extensive functionality via simple entry of commands. In this workshop we will customize the development experience by adding personal ⭐︎flair⭐︎ and making the most of limited screen real estate. Customizing the prompt provides additional information and functionality with the bonus of flair. Participants will be able to take pride in custom craftsmanship with the result.
Hacks
Pamela Ocampo, Rachel Walker

* Nest + Pellet Stove + Yurt

Nest is a twenty-first century take on a nineteenth century thermostat. A pellet stove is a modern version of a campfire that won't burn the house down. A modern yurt is a high tech tent based on an age old Mongolian design. Can they all work together?
Hacks
Lars Lohn

* Net Art Praxis: Making Internet-Based Visual Art using Open Source

A discussion of the movement known as "net art" and its intersection with open source. We will look at the emerging aesthetic of net art, how the open nature of the internet is challenging the art world, and how to use amazing open source libraries to make visual art in the browser.
Hacks
Mark Hintz

* Network Science for Fun and Profit

Understanding the relationships between data elements has become increasingly valuable, as LinkedIn, Facebook and Google illustrate. Network science provides a means to understand, explain, predict and otherwise utilize these relationships. I will provide a brief overview of network science, with examples and illustrations using R, focused on providing an entry point to their use for fun and profit.
Cooking
John Taylor

* OAuth, IndieAuth, and the Future of Authorization APIs

You use OAuth every time you log in to Facebook or Twitter, but what if you could use it from your own website? What if your own domain became a source of data, and you had your own personal API? By decentralizing authorization to your own domain instead of a silo, you control when, how, and to whom your data is shared.
Chemistry
Aaron Parecki

* Open Hardware from Breadboard to PCB

So you've built a breadboard circuit with wires everywhere. What's next? A printed circuit board! I'll talk about your open hardware development options through the lens of my recent project turning a breadboard prototype into a finished Arduino shield for a curing oven at Portland State.
Cooking
Jenner Hanni

* Open Source is Not Enough: The Importance of Algorithm Transparency

Opaque algorithms increasingly control our access to information, on the web and beyond. Why is that a problem, and what can we do about it?
Culture
Rachel Shadoan

* Open source software could save libraries! Maybe!

There are opportunities for open source to help save the day for libraries, ending many of librarians' and library users' woes.
Business
Coral Sheldon-Hess

* Open Sourcing Mental Illness: Ending The Stigma

An open, honest discussion of mental illness from the perspective of a web developer. We can learn to survive, cope, and thrive.
Culture
Ed Finkler

* OpenStreetWhat? Mapping The World With Open Data

Come learn about OpenStreetMap, a Wikipedia-like project with over one million contributors aiming to map the entire world. We'll talk about the project, the data, and how to do some cool things with it.
Cooking
Justin Miller, Rafa Gutierrez

* Random

If you want to understand randomness better (and you should), this is the talk for you.
Chemistry
Bart Massey

* REI's Expedition into Open Source

The software engineers at REI build, maintain, and operate the cooperative’s digital retail infrastructure, from our mobile apps to REI.com, and it runs on open source. We see many benefits to open sourcing our code, but it’s uncharted territory for REI. This is our journey preparing the cooperative to contribute our code back to the open source community. Will we be successful? What have we learned? You’ll find out!
Business
Rob McGuire-Dale

* Rocket Science On Github

Git isn't just for code. What about CAD files? Experimental test data? How do you manage a multidisciplinary project with git? Last year Portland State Aerospace Society, a relatively large open source rocketry project, moved all their work onto github. I'll share my experience with the switch from a few self hosted git repos to a full fledged github presence. What worked, what hasn't, github's features for non coders, and a little on the future of open science.
Culture
Nathan Bergey

* Slytherin 101: How To Win Friends and Influence People

Do you wish that you were better at getting people to do what you need them to do? Do you keep getting put in charge of things and then get stuck wondering how the heck you're supposed to get things done? Do you keep getting into conflicts with other people because of stuff you've said, and you aren't entirely sure why? Fortunately, Slytherin House has you covered. Come to this talk and learn the basics of how to hack human relationships, using the tools of cunning and ambition to achieve inter-House harmony. As long as you promise not to use these techniques to support the next Dark Lord, of course.
Culture
Denise Paolucci

* Speaker Support of Awesomeness: How I went from stage fright to stage presence and want to help others do the same.

Once upon a time, I was terrified of public speaking. I went from having stage fright to being a stage presence who speaks at conferences. I run a support group for old and new speakers called the "Tech Conf Speaker Support of Awesomeness." I want to talk about what we do, why we do it, and how well it's worked out so far. This talk is about speaking for the first time, improving your talks, and how conference organizers and attendees can help too.
Culture
Julie Pagano

* SQL Utility Belt

SQL is an incredibly powerful language, but it can be difficult sometimes to advance beyond the basics. In this session, we will go over several tricks and tips to expand your SQL tool kit.
Cooking
Michael Alan Brewer

* Supporting communities with Gittip

There are lots of people doing good work in the world, and while there seems to be a myriad of ways to provide financial "donations", few of them provide a way to do so in a sustainable manner. We're going to look at Gittip, a freedom loving platform to provide a sustainable, predictable income to those making the world a better place.
Culture
Paul Fenwick

* Surviving Support: 10 Tips for Saving Your Users and Yourself

When I open sourced my plugin to the WordPress community, user support was one of the last things on my mind - I was more excited to have written awesome code and a helpful site extension. Shortly thereafter though, customer support was the only thing I had time for. When your user base ranges in skill level from experienced developer to your grandmother, well… you've gotta be prepared for just about anything. This session will highlight the challenges and benefits of stellar support and offer a few tricks to make the process as painless as possible for both your user and yourself.
Culture
Julie Cameron

* The 20,000km view: How GPS works

GPS is more than just letting your phone tell you where you are. I believe GPS is a contender for "most amazing piece of engineering in the history of humanity", and I'll show you why.
Chemistry
Jamey Sharp

* The Case for Junior Developers

Are you passionate about building tech, but think there is no place in your organization for junior developers? Come explore the true costs and benefits of hiring junior developers and see how you can improve your company while helping juniors become the best developers they can be.
Culture
Shawna Scott

* The joy of volunteering with open technology and culture

Volunteering is a fun way to explore your interests and passions. In this talk, I will detail my experiences in volunteering with open projects like Wikipedia and Mozilla. I will also talk about fun ways to introduce newbies into volunteering based on my experience with conducting outreach sessions for open projects.
Culture
Netha Hussain

* The Keys to Working Remotely

When I tell people I work from home, they tend to assume I spend the day playing with my dog outside. It's beyond comprehension to most that I actually spend as much time working as they do, sometimes more. I hope to enlighten those close-minded people about the possibilities working from home offers and how to do it well. Session slides: http://www.carsonshold.com/talks/keys-to-working-remotely/
Culture
Carson Shold

* The Outreach Program for Women: what works & what's next

We've mentored and interned in the Outreach Program for Women, and we know it works -- it improves the gender balance inside open source communities. We'll discuss why it works, how it builds off of Google Summer of Code, and discuss replicating it, expanding it, and looking at the next step in the recruiting and inclusion pipeline.
Cooking
Sumana Harihareswara, Liz Henry

* The Promise of Collaborative Magic

Open source thrives on the idea of people helping one another in reaching their project's goals. But is it working the way that it's supposed to be? This session hopes to discuss the importance of constructive collaboration in our communities, how we encourage them, and what we can do if they're not working out the way they're supposed to.
Culture
Josh Lim

* Towards more diversity-friendly social networks

How can we make social networks more "diversity-friendly"? It starts with an anti-oppression attitude, embedded in the community guidelines and norms; and includes the right tools, technologies, and policies. This session will look at what does and doesn't work in a variety of online environments, and will include an annotated collection of resources on the wiki.
Culture
Jon Pincus, Deborah Pierce

* Trust, Community, and Automatic Updates

WordPress shipped in October what is perhaps its most polarizing feature ever — automatic updates in the background of self-hosted web software, on by default and no easy way to turn it off. In most open source communities, this would be cause for open revolt. Learn how through trust, communication, and a steadfast commitment to its philosophies, the WordPress core team convinced a skeptical community to go along, even if it meant users giving up some control.
Culture
Andrew Nacin

* Unicorns Are People, Too: Re-Thinking Soft and Hard Skills

As developers, we tend to value hard skills that can be quantified or measured objectively. Job postings search for unicorns, but we are people first and foremost and being human isn't as easy as programming. While the code comes easily, the soft skills that make us human are complicated and difficult to get right. This talk will explore the danger of neglecting so-called "soft" skills, what we stand to lose by overvaluing technical skills, and alternatives to the hard and soft dichotomy.
Culture
Liz Abinante

* Utilizing open source medical systems to reach the next 33 million

There is an increase in double burden of diseases in developing countries accruing from the rise of non communicable and infectious diseases. This situation is worsened by lack of adequate financing, inadequate infrastructure for delivering health care, low health literacy and inadequate personnel. Health information systems drive the global health agenda , and huge investments are continuously being made to bridge the digital divide to improve health care delivery. 1. What are the opportunities to effectively deploy open source technologies in developing countries? 2. How do we create ownership, partnerships and collaborations that support scaling open source medical records system 3. What are the effective design thinking techniques that drive development of open source record systems
Business
judy wawira

* UX Design in Action: Redesigning the Mailman UI

One of the upcoming features in the Mailman 3 project is a front-end redesign of the mail archiver web interface. Learn more about the new interface, its progress so far, and the designing challenges of building a mobile-first responsive web site. The talk will also illustrate our design process and provide you with design methods and evaluation techniques that you can take back to your own project.
Chemistry
Karen Tang

* Vim Your Way

You’ve learned to do things Vim’s way; now it’s time for Vim to learn to do things your way. We'll learn more about customizing Vim to fit your needs and workflow.
Cooking
Emily St.

* When Firefox Faceplants - what the fox says and who is listening

Ever seen Firefox crash and hesitated to press that 'Send the Report' button because you don't know what would happen next? This is what happens next.
Chemistry
Lars Lohn

* When Many Eyes Fail You: Tales from Security Standards and Open Source

It's often said that "given many eyes, all bugs are shallow" and open source proponents love to list this as a reason that open source is more secure than its closed-source relatives. While that makes a nice sound bite, the reality of security with many eyeballs doesn't fit so nicely into a tweet. This talk will explore some of the things that surprised me in going from academic security research to industry security research in open source and open standards.
Culture
Terri Oda

* Working Effectively with People in Government on Open Source Projects

Ever thought about ways to use your open source skills to improve your city? In this session we'll talk about successful models for working with people in government, from pitching your project, communicating effectively, finding experts, tracking down data, to launching in the community.
Culture
Jason Denizac

* Write an Excellent Programming Blog

As a member of the open source community, do you contribute only code, or also words? Writing about programming benefits yourself and others. This talk outlines solid article structures, suggests topics to write about, explains how blogging about programming is special, and inspires you to write articles of enduring value.
Culture
A. Jesse Jiryu Davis