M Edward Borasky's favorites

Favorite sessions for this user

* A Community-Driven Future for Open Data Kit (ODK)

Open Data Kit (ODK) replaces paper surveys with smartphones. ODK tools are open-source and are primarily used by social good organizations to collect data quickly, accurately, offline, and at scale. ODK has been used to collect billions of data points around the world. In this talk, Yaw Anokwa and Hélène Martin, two of the leaders of the ODK community discuss the problems that inspired ODK’s design, demonstrate the impact the tools are having, and describe how the Open Source Bridge community can contribute to an open-source, community-driven future for mobile data collection tools.
Activism
Yaw Anokwa, Hélène Martin

* Containers: A Guide for the Perplexed

WTF are containers anyway? And what aren't they? And what is all this other ... stuff? Come find out.
Theory
Josh Berkus

* Create your own type system in 45 minutes

Don't let programming language designers have all the fun: you can design your own type system that is better than the current one.
Theory
Michael Ernst

* Decoding the history of codes

The word "code" means different things to different people. In this talk, we explore cryptography and how it's evolved over time. We look at some key historical events and see how the art of encryption affected our lives.
Theory
Niharika Kohli

* Democratizing Data: What You Need to Know as a Developer to Keep Your Data Collection and Usage Ethical

By 2020 each person will create 1.7 MB of new data per second flooding us in 44 trillion GB of data! What’s this mean? From Uber’s “ride of shame” scandal to the role of Facebook’s news recommender in the presidential election we as developers must ask how we use data and what the implications are for open source software.
Activism
Lorena Mesa

* Futel: The Network We Deserve

Futel has provided free public telephone service, telephone-mediated art, and live human interaction for several years, and was recognized as Portland's most prolific payphone installer of 2016. Now that we are finally living in the cyberpunk dystopia promised in the 80s, we are poised to seize this moment.
Activism
Karl Anderson

* Getting to 0.1.0: Build Management for Your Personal Project

There's a lot that goes into a great open-source repository besides the code. How do you make your project easy for a newcomer to understand? What about easy to install, to test, and to contribute to? Big projects have whole teams dedicated to building robust releases, but you're just a solo dev with a dream. Great news! You don't have to put your project on hold to study build engineering. Come learn a few simple tools that will put some professional polish on your personal project.
Practice
Finn Ellis

* Hi! It takes more than engineering skills to make your company successful. Let's talk about it.

Let's be real: tech companies value engineering skills over most other skills, and it shows in both salaries and decisionmaking. This talk is about why this happens, why it's problematic, and how we can refocus importance on all the skills that make companies successful.
Culture
Lyzi Diamond

* How To Mentor Humans

I feel passionately that women and epecially minority women in tech need mentors and that those already in tech have a duty to step up for them, even though it means getting out of their comfort zone. How do you mentor minorities? How do you mentor anyone? With kindness and respect.
Culture
Letta Raven

* How to Pay People for Their Work

Paying people for their work is radical, whether we're talking about open source contributions, second-shift diversity work, or even care at home. But giving people the resources necessary to make these community contributions is the only way to make our communities more sustainable.
Culture
Thursday Bram

* I Have ADD and So Can -- Ooh, Shiny!

Neurodiversity is the hidden diversity on our teams. Unlike obvious external markers, mental and personality quirks or invisible disabilities are not always easy for us to remember or adjust for. But sometimes diversity in this area is as important as any other.
Culture
Heidi Waterhouse

* In 1968 Mom built a computer: women's routes as technologists

On the surface, this story shares vignettes about my Mom. But its purpose is to increase awareness of human resources in technology, and overlooked pathways of young technologiests. "c. 1973 RCA hired her for the chip prototyping lab. Her new co-workers compared each other's crochet at lunch. A marathon week of late-night needlework bought her acceptance and promotion to supervisor. She told me stories about the ladies who wrapped wires for NASA a few years before, about women's centuries of fingers in technical fiber-crafts finally being noticed when it put men on the moon."
Culture
Katheryn Sutter

* It Can't Happen Here: But what if it does? Open-source alternative communication infrastructure

This talk will focus on what happens when the internet infrastructure we know and love goes down - by natural disaster or human-instigated shutdown (think Mubarak in Egypt during the Arab Spring).
Activism
jenka soderberg

* Learn the lambda calculus and be a better programmer

Come learn an ancient model of pen & paper programming in order to change how you think about code
Theory
Clarissa Littler

* Learn to Type at 250 WPM Using Open Source Tools

The Open Steno Project is dedicated to the creation of open source software, hardware, and educational materials to bring machine stenography to the masses! Want to be a speed demon typist like the court reporters you see in movies? Now you can!
Practice
Josh Lifton

* Mapbox GL: A modern, robust, open source map renderer on web and mobile

Come learn about the open source Mapbox GL native and web map renderer, how it is designed, the open specs on which it is built, and how to use it in your projects.
Practice
Justin Miller

* microWorking Open Workshop (microWOW): Launch Your Open Project!

Getting a project off the ground is daunting, and most of us aren’t trained in project management and community building skills. At this session, Mozilla Science Lab will help you take your project from idea to reality and give you technical, project management, and community building skills to kickstart your work.
Practice
Danielle Robinson

* Morning Keynote — Fake Science! Sad! A case study of the perils of Open Data

Open source allows anyone to use their skills to change the world--for better or for worse. In an era where the phrase "Fake News!" echoes from the highest office of the land, we have to cast a critical eye on the works that we promote and participate in. Open Data is no exception, and the use of Open Data to generate Fake Analyses is a real issue that can undermine social progress.
Activism
Emily Gorcenski

* Out of the Game: How Apps Fail Oppressed Users (and what you can do to help)

Apps and websites routinely expose user information in service of social and interactive goals. But what happens when your user has a stalker? Many of these services will compromise the safety of users who are already at risk. Making things worse, some developers resist making changes, with justifications such as "If someone's in that much danger, they shouldn't be doing anything online," and "It's basically impossible to defend against a state actor." This overview will help developers take the risk factors into account, and make development decisions that puts control back into the hands of the users. There's no way to perfectly remove the risk of going online if you're in danger, but people will go online anyway. Many more users at risk are facing technically naive attackers than are facing highly skilled attackers such as state actors.
Activism
Alex Byrne, Azure Lunatic

* Quantum Computers and Where to Hide from Them

After making the smallest possible transistors, scientists are developing new computation methods based on quantum mechanics. This talk is an intro to: what makes quantum computing special, how to build assembly-like instructions for quantum computers in Python and JavaScript, and how we could start encrypting data to avoid quantum codebreaking.
Theory
Nick Doiron

* Quick and Dirty WordPress Sites That Don't Suck

If you're on a budget but you need a website that doesn't suck and actually helps your business / organization / cause, I'll show you how to create one for under $1000 / year and a lot of sweat equity.
Hacks
Kronda Adair

* Seasons of Debian - Summer of Code and Winter of Outreachy

A talk about Google Summer of Code and Outreachy Internship Program with Debian. Discusses Urvika Gola and Pranav Jain’s work with Debian on an open source project for an android ‘Lumicall’ application.
Culture
Urvika Gola, Pranav Jain

* Starting Backwards

"topics include research, not losing your way, and not losing your mind."
Hacks
Caito Scherr

* SVG: So Very Good

Icon fonts! CSS-only illustrations! High-resolution GIF animations! Today's web designers still regularly and enthusiastically employ these techniques... yet they're all a better fit for SVG, a powerful vector image format that's already old enough to drive a car.
Theory
Tyler Sticka

* The Set of Programmers: How Math Restricts Us

People new to programming often have to work through barriers of language and learning in order to become proficient and being contributing. Does one of those barriers need to be one's math skills? Most schools and textbooks seem to think so. Let's discuss how we're introducing new developers to programming and whether we can make it more inclusive by removing the mathematics and replacing it with logic.
Culture
Carol Smith

* TIL There's a Microtonal Synth in My Browser!

Did you know there's a digital sound synthesizer in your browser? There is! It's called the Web Audio API and it's accessible from any JavaScript library or framework. I'll show you how I hacked Web Audio to make microtonal music in the browser.
Hacks
M Edward Borasky

* Unionizing Tech: Everybody needs a union

The Open Source Movement has a few defining traits, such as the the do-it-yourself, stick-it-to-the-man scrappiness; the caring about the people around us and their experience with the software or workplace; and, the way it is forever adaptable to the needs of the situation. Open source and unions have a lot in common - lets get started unionizing open source shops!
Culture
Sam Scott

* Why Is a Raven Like a Pull Request: What Writing Workshops Can Bring to Code Reviews

Many talks aimed at beginners to open source contribution assume that concepts like peer review and justification of intent are brand new. If you have ever experienced the thrills–and/or horrors–of a writing workshop, many ideas central to a successful pull request aren't that new at all. Let's talk about what experienced workshoppers and the field of writing critique can bring to your OS project.
Culture
Christine Bryant-Ryback

* Writing Inclusively about Technology Topics

Based on The Responsible Communication Style Guide, this workshop is an introduction to the concepts in the style guide. It also covers how a style guide can be an effective part of the workflow when creating and promoting technology projects (including open source).
Culture
Thursday Bram

Favorite proposals for this user

* #pdxtech The Shadow World of Portland tech

A panel of #pdxtech irc community members giving their take on the Portland tech scene
Culture 2017-03-07 22:29:05 +0000
Tyler Gillies

* 100 Days of Creativity

People often claim you can't schedule creativity, or blithely claim anyone can learn to be creative, without actually consistently doing it themselves. In this talk, Aaron Parecki will describe how (and why) he decided to take on not one, but two 100-day projects: creating 100 pieces of music, as well as making 100 IndieWeb improvements for 100 days in a row. Aaron will show how he was able to stay focused, prioritize, as well as the challenges he encountered along the way.
Practice 2017-03-31 23:17:53 +0000
Aaron Parecki

* Ansible 101

Wanna use an easy-to-learn automation platform? Of course you do. And I say "automation platform" rather than "configuration management" because Ansible isn't just about configuration.
Practice 2017-03-30 14:53:01 +0000
Josh Berkus

* Applied Abstract Problems in FOSS Infrastructure

This talk will focus on some of the mathematical aspects of DevOps demonstrated through the investigation of problems in FOSS Infrastructure.
Theory 2017-03-22 23:59:43 +0000
Daniel Pono Takamori

* Archetypal Ballers and Ternary Plots - Visualizing NBA Skills for Fun and Profit

Basketball is second only to baseball in its rich variety of detailed data and analysis techniques. This project uses two techniques to reduce this complexity. The first, archetypal analysis, is an unsupervised learning technique that reduces the 18-dimensional box scores to a three-dimensional vector. The second, ternary plots, provides an elegant visualization for comparing players and teams. Using these techniques, I'll review the 2016 - 2017 NBA season.
Theory 2017-03-29 21:44:54 +0000
M Edward Borasky

* Build a real-time data pipeline with Apache Kafka

Get your hands dirty with Apache Kafka building a simplistic streaming application that ingests data, performs transformations on it, and exposes it through APIs
Practice 2017-04-08 20:01:11 +0000
michael schoenfelder

* Containerized Clustered Postgres

Interested in clustered or sharded PostgreSQL, but daunted by challenges of testing and deployment for multiple PostgreSQL nodes? Container infrastructure tools will make things much easier for you, and we'll show you how.
Practice 2017-03-30 15:30:45 +0000
Josh Berkus

* Emacs's org-mode: a writing and organizing multitool

This talk will present org-mode, a package for the emacs editor, as a tool useful for everything from writing talks, to keeping a journal, organizing your todos, and developing literate code
Hacks 2017-03-31 19:09:47 +0000
Clarissa Littler

* Flourishing FLOSS: Making Your Project Successful

You maintain an Open Source project but your project isn’t succeeding in the ways you want? In this talk we’ll explore the different components of an OS project & how they work together. Afterwards you’ll be well-equipped with a ideas & strategies for growing, and nourishing your OS project.
Practice 2017-03-22 11:10:58 +0000
Anna Ossowski

* From the mouth of a child: A young hacker’s perspective on Open Source culture

I've been around Open Source my entire life. As a young FOSS dev, I've grown up looking at the community from the perspective that this is "my people". This talk looks at some of what I can definitively say are victories, a retrospective of two decades of lessons learned, and finally some challenges our community faces.
Culture 2017-03-10 01:42:02 +0000
Morgan Gangwere

* In pursuit of happy coding

This talk is about text editors, IDEs and their evolution through the time. What does the modern day programmer prefer, the IDEs or the text editors? Also we will try to settle the war b/w 2 of the longest-lived applications, vi & emacs. Also you will hear about my favourite text editor.
Practice 2017-04-09 18:03:45 +0000
Rishi Jain

* IndieWeb 101: owning your content and identity

The IndieWeb strives to create an alternative to content silos and the 'corporate web'. This is achieved through creating a single source of truth for your content and identity aka a personal domain. Let's explore the ramifications of this and answer any questions you might have together!
Activism 2017-03-27 21:45:45 +0000
Wm Salt Hale

* Introduction to Julia Programming

Would you like to learn a new programming language and some basketball analytics? Julia is the latest in a long line of programming languages designed for scientific computing. In Part 1 of this introduction, I'll go over the basic concepts of scientific computing and Julia. In Part 2, I'll show you how to apply these concepts and Julia to basketball analytics, using data freely available on the web.
Practice 2017-03-21 01:31:36 +0000
M Edward Borasky

* Keepassing your credentials synced and under control

Do you use the same few passwords over and over? Is there a piece of paper with hard-to-remember ones somewhere? How about a file that lives on five different devices and is never up-to-date? Even the most secure passwords can be broken with a $5 wrench. Long forgotten websites are frequently compromised. Files can be stored in The Cloud, but is that really where such sensitive data should be?
Practice 2017-03-27 21:41:52 +0000
Wm Salt Hale

* Kubernetes 101

So you’ve containerized your application, and now you want to deploy it scalably across a cluster. Maybe you’ve looked at Kubernetes but you can’t figure out how to use it. In one short session, we’ll teach you enough to get started.
Practice 2017-03-30 14:47:20 +0000
Josh Berkus

* Making your app Password-Free

Learn how to make security easy by eliminating passwords for your app entirely with magic link based authentication!
Practice 2017-03-31 16:30:16 +0000
Eric Mann

* Nothing is better than the Optional type

Optional should be prohibited: it is an overreaction to a problem that already has an elegant solution.
Practice 2017-04-01 05:10:32 +0000
Michael Ernst

* The Death of Data: Retention, Rot, and Risk

I want to problematize keeping deprecated codebases around, and emphasize that mindless retention of data and code just increases our threat surfaces for attack and data corruption. Attackers in the future may be motivated by both ideology and money, and we are responsible for that.
Activism 2017-04-01 01:53:25 +0000
Heidi Waterhouse

* The Emerging Interoperable Social Web — Standardizing the Social Web II

In this sequel to last year's talk, Aaron Parecki will cover the current state of interoperable implementations of the well-established W3C standards you heard about last year. Many of these standards have grown this year both in number of implementations and their live usage on the web. In addition, Aaron will cover this year's emerging standards that have a few implementations and could use additional experimentation and feedback.
Theory 2017-03-31 22:44:58 +0000
Aaron Parecki

* The end of array bounds errors

Stay in bounds: never suffer an array indexing error again, with tooling that allows you to express and enforce specifications (contracts).
Practice 2017-04-01 05:13:04 +0000
Michael Ernst

* The Kids Are Going to be 200 OK

Infosec is like sex ed. If you wait until kids need it, you have waited too long. Schools don't, peers can't, we have to.
Culture 2017-04-01 02:03:24 +0000
Heidi Waterhouse

* The Monster on the Project

Abusive behaviour can have profound effects on personal relationships but it can also make open source contributing and office life miserable. For those stuck in a team with co workers who exhibit toxic behavior, going to work every day can feel like going to a battlefield. Knowing how to identify and how to respond to unreasonable behavior is vital. In this talk we will look at the ways we can improve our office and FOSS communities by recognizing, managing and gracefully removing this toxic behavior.
Culture 2017-04-02 22:13:33 +0000
Tiberius Hefflin

* Voting-Method-Reform Activism

Activists around the world are experimenting with using voting to coordinate their decisions, and it's obvious that secure, open-source software must handle this form of communication. Yet typically such software is developed without involving "voting architects" who understand the math behind fair and unfair voting methods. Let's bridge this gap. Together we can build surveys and decentralized collaboration systems that bring democracy to very high levels of fairness, especially compared to the intentionally unfair use of single-mark ballots in governmental elections.
Activism 2017-03-13 06:20:31 +0000
Richard Fobes

* Want to own Twitter? The burgeoning Platform Cooperativism movement and what it means for you.

They have started up democratic copies of major platforms. They are building ways to better collaborate using the internet. They’re even talking about citizens buying out and protecting important internet communities like Twitter. Who are these people? They are Platform Cooperativists.
Activism 2017-04-01 06:18:47 +0000
Taylor McLeod

* What I Learned from My Own Just In Time Compiler

We all know the V8 javascript engine, and modern JVMs, are very fast. But why? Sometimes, its easier to find out by reinventing the wheel than from reading monolithic codebases.
Theory 2017-03-29 17:08:53 +0000
Michael R Fairhurst

* Where Am I? Build Your Own Open-Source Geocoder!

At Hack Oregon, we often need to geocode or reverse-geocode - translate an address to latitude and longitude or vice versa. There are public APIs for this, but most of them have rate limits or intellectual property constraints that impact their usefulness. So we built our own, using the Census Bureau TIGER/Line® shapefiles, PostGIS Tiger geocoder, and Docker. I'll go through the process, from downloading the data and filtering to deploying the final image.
Practice 2017-04-01 00:18:41 +0000
M Edward Borasky

* Working around AWS Lambda's limits with Ansible

This talk would explain how we used Ansible's master-slave provisioning orchestration to work around AWS Lambda's limits.
Hacks 2017-03-13 12:28:28 +0000
Jalem Raj Raj Rohit